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4.5 out of 5 stars
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4.5 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£31.95+ £1.26 shipping
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on 14 November 2006
This was the first Uriah Heep album that i bought .It was recommended to me some 14 years ago now, having never heard of them or one of their songs , i bought it and was glad i did.

If you like rock music of the early 70's e.g. purple, sabbath, zeppelin, etc, then you'll like this too.

It is a great debut album, the music is very raw and there is a great variety of tunes.

The late David Byron had an amazing voice and vocal range, Mick Box and Ken Hensley both provide top quality guitar and keyboard playing, that along with the rest of the band makes for some great music.

Uriah Heep were slated by the critics and yet have put up with it to this day , still around and still touring !

I give this album 4 stars because its not my favorite U H album,

but that said it is well worth a buy .

So if you've been sitting there for ages wondering what UH are like ? try it , you'll like it .
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VINE VOICEon 20 March 2007
Slaughtered by the music press from the beginning, Uriah Heep were always a prime target for the cool brigade. Indeed, they were one of the most obvious bands to go up against the wall when punk rock hit town. That's a shame, as this debut album reveals that they were a proficient outfit with some craft and imagination. 'Gypsy', which opens the album, is the oustanding track by some distance. The striking opening bars make up for a protracted introduction, David Byron draws you straight into the story the song tells, and the main theme drives the whole thing forward. In the six minutes allotted, the band vary the combinations between guitar, organ and rhythm section. Across the album, they also vary their style.

If there is a problem with UH, it is that, whatever they tried, there was always someone else who did it better. Deep Purple rather stole their thunder using the same band format, having the edge on musical talent, finesse and, sometimes, material. That doesn't make UH a pointless exercise, however, as they were no Purple clones and much of their music rocks harder. Some of the material is a tad ordinary: 'Lucy Blues' is competent, but blues was a dead end for a band like this. 'I'll Keep On Trying' isn't all bad, but hasn't aged too well and it's one of those tracks on which th band seem to forget to rock. Even so, this is the first of a series of five fine rock albums by UH in the early 1970s.
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on 23 January 2007
GREAT FIRST ALBUM, SAW THEM LIVE LOTS IN EARLY 70'S GREAT LIVE AND STILL GOING MUST BE DOING SOMETHING RIGHT. WELL WORTH A PURCHASE IF YOU LIKE ORGAN GUITAR ROCK
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 6 December 2008
from a band always destined to play 2nd fiddle to zep/sabbath and purple,like wishbone ash and hawkwind this band never got the credit they deserved,certainly better music would be made in future albums but the class was there to be heard in gypsy/dreamare/lucy blues etc a variety of styles all on the one record,first heep album i bought,thanks to the sleeve,those were the days.
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on 5 April 2013
I still have this album on vinyl, thought it was about time to get a CD for the car. I have really enjoyed hearing it again, often, and loud. The extra tracks provide good value for money overall, the only trouble now, is I want to upgrade all of my collection. Based on this purchase I am sure it will be done, now, what have I done with my skinny jeans?
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on 18 February 2009
Two or three stand-out tracks on this album make "Very 'Eavy..." a must-have, namely Gypsy and Dreammare (both stunning), and - if you can swallow a vague distrust of sentimental-anti-war-ballads - Come Away Melinda.

A lot of the rest is vaguely bluesy filler.
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on 30 April 2012
This was purchased out of curiosity mainly because Uriah Heep were rehearsing at Hanwell at the same time as Deep Purple were preparing to record "in Rock".
Unfortunately for the Heap it is not as good.
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on 10 December 2007
First saw Uriah Heep in the early seventies on the Students' Union circuit when they were promoting this album. Great night, it was. Obviously, I still have the vinyl in pristine condition, but will be getting the cd version to protect the original classic.
To my mind, Mick Box is an outstanding guitarist, who can hold his own in any company, past or present.
So do yourself a favour, and buy it. You won't regret it.
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on 12 November 2004
Uriah Heep was never a cool outfit. Second-stringers in the heavy metal stakes, like a poor person's Deep Purple. Now after many years of disinterest, consigned to the bargain bins of eternity.
Except that, on this evidence, David Byron and Mick Box had created a red-hot rocking band of which they should be proud. This reissue of the 1970 debut album, with additional tracks, is a real eye-opener. There is archetypal 70's heavy prog on display, with screaming guitar, wailing male falsetto and throbbing organ (Gypsy)! There is unexpected light and shade, with acoustic guitars and relatively sensitive lyrics (Come Away Melinda). There are rare bonus tracks (including well-recorded BBC sessions and B-sides) to make this a worthwhile purchase even for owners of the original 33rpm vinyl. Also included is Bird of Prey, which was included on the US release of Very 'eavy Very 'umble but which, in the UK, was held back until the follow-up album Salisbury was released in 1971.
All in all, an unexpectedly enjoyable romp through nostalgic heaviness. Time for a thorough re-evaluation of these early 70's progsters.
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on 6 April 2013
Not my favourite Heep album by far, but it sounds much better on this version and more enjoyable. If you want Heep's first album for your collection, it is well worth buying.
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