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4.5 out of 5 stars
126
4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 3 November 2016
This is a must for every Stargate movie fan. I like the tv-show cast much more than the movie one. Season 1 tells an interesting story and is quite funny as well : ))
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on 29 April 2017
Well pleased & Thank you
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on 14 June 2017
First time watching stargate I absolutely love it! Everything is in good condition, arrived very quickly and is a great show
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on 28 May 2017
Very good value.
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on 11 May 2017
amazing
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on 12 October 2014
I like this Season and at a great price
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on 18 February 2002
Season One of Stargate SG-1 was undoubtedly a mixed bag. I think many if not most fans would agree that S2 and S3 were better. However, mixed bag or not, to call this tiny selection the 'best of' S1 seriously undersells S1. There are only four episodes on this DVD: Children of the Gods (the excellent sequel to the 1994 movie and pilot for the series); There But For The Grace of God (another excellent episode); Politics (a pretty weak clip-show that nevertheless has to be included as it is part of a 4-episode arc) and the outstanding Within The Serpent's Grasp. However, there were many excellent episodes in S1 that are *not* included on this DVD and anyone trying to get a flavour of the first season from this DVD is going to end up feeling a little baffled and short-changed.
For a start, important themes from Children of the Gods are concluded in The Enemy Within which is not included on this disc. Also many episodes which begin far-reaching story arcs continued in later seasons (which are available on DVD) are not included here, leading to more bafflement for the viewer. Quite apart from their value as conveyers of important information about the team, there can be no excuse for not including such excellent episodes as The Nox, The Torment of Tantalus, Bloodlines, Fire & Water, Cor-Ai, Enigma, and Solitudes.
It's true that not every S1 episode was a winner. Some, like Emancipation are downright embarrassing, and Broca Divide, Brief Candle, and The First Commandment also have their less than stellar moments. However, with the exception of Emancipation, there isn't a single S1 episode that doesn't have *some* merit; something that can't be necessarily be said about some S4 and S5 episodes which are being granted a DVD release.
What is even more galling is that the far more 'patchy' fourth season of Stargate has been released in its entirety by MGM simply because it was filmed on 35mm and S1 wasn't. The film quality of S1 may not be quite as high as later seasons but there are scripts and stories in this season which are equal to anything produced since (Solitudes for one) and in some cases superior to almost every Stargate episode produced later (The Torment of Tantalus) in fidelity to the original themes of the Stargate feature film and originality of storyline.
So, great to have some S1 episodes on DVD, but how much more satisfying if MGM had released them all in a boxset for Region 2 viewers as well as for Region 1 viewers.
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Most TV shows spun off from movies are uninvolving and uninteresting ("Blade," anyone?), and hopefully die and are forgotten.

That wasn't the case with the spinoff of the 1995 movie "Stargate," an okay science fiction movie that spawned an excellent television series, "Stargate SG-1." The first season is not nearly as brilliant as the ones that followed it, but it's a welcome change from distant space operas -- excellent writing, acting, and a sense of humor about itself and its characters.

The Stargate has been inactive for a year -- until it is activated, and a bunch of Egyptian-styled warriors come through and kidnap a young officer. General Hammond (Don S. Davis) pulls Jack O'Neill (Richard Dean Anderson) out of retirement to learn what really happened on the planet of Abydos, and where these mysterious aliens have come from.

O'Neill and a small team go to Abydos and find Daniel Jackson (Michael Shanks) who has been learning about a vast network of Stargates over the past year. But when Daniel's wife Sha're and brother-in-law Skaara are abducted by the same warriors, O'Neill, Jackson and Air Force scientist Sam Carter (Amanda Tapping) use the Stargate to venture to where they're being kept.

What they find is an alien race who inhabits human hosts, the Goa'uld, and their ruthless slave warriors, the Jaffa. Carter, O'Neill and Jackson are captured by the powerful Apophis -- but to escape, they must have the help of an unlikely ally: Teal'c (Christopher Judge), Apophis' First Prime. Since Earth has now annoyed the Goa'uld, several exploration teams are formed to go through the Stargate and find weapons and allies.

And SG-1 -- Carter, O'Neill, Jackson and Teal'c -- encounters some very strange problems: a plague that turns people into savages, a people who live only a hundred days, a Viking planet, a Stargate explorer stranded since 1945, a little girl turned into a bomb, the seductive Goa'uld queen Hathor, and coming back as robots. And when the military shuts down the SG program, Daniel reveals that the Earth is about to be destroyed by Apophis' armies...

The first season of "Stargate SG-1" isn't the most impressive, though the last three episodes hint at the series' future greatness. And thankfully, it drops the usual space opera stuff -- instead we get Stargates, real military, and a very plausible reason why everybody in the galaxy (more or less) looks just like us.

It's graced with kitschy Egyptian-styled sets, lots of shoot-em-up action from Marines and Air Force, and plenty of planets influenced by Earth cultures, like the Minoans and the Vikings. Best of all is the snappy dialogue, mostly from the tart-tongued O'Neill ("Temperature--ground 1700 degrees Fahrenheit. Air--seems to be in pockets, ranging from 1500 degrees down to 200." "Sounds like LA").

And the makers add some poignant and/or warm scenes, such as the eager Abydonian teenagers celebrating with O'Neill and his pals, Teal'c reunion with his outcast family, or Sam bonding with a doomed little girl. All the characters get these moments, which really makes them seem human.

Instead of Kurt Russell's suicidal O'Neill from the movie, Anderson does a quirky, disrespectful, pop culture-lovin' guy with a hidden tragic past -- his "Cold Lazarus"double role is one of the best of the show. Tapping and Shanks are also great, as an enthusiastic geek and a smart, capable military woman. Sadly Judge gets shortchanged as the stern, honorable Teal'c, but he's brilliant when he's spotlighted.

The first season of "Stargate SG-1" is not the best of the series, but it's still a solid, imaginative sci-fi story with some great writing and even better acting. A must-have for sci-fi buffs.
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Most TV shows spun off from movies are uninvolving and uninteresting ("Blade," anyone?), and hopefully die and are forgotten.

That wasn't the case with the spinoff of the 1995 movie "Stargate," an okay science fiction movie that spawned an excellent television series, "Stargate SG-1." The first season is not nearly as brilliant as the ones that followed it, but it's a welcome change from distant space operas -- excellent writing, acting, and a sense of humor about itself and its characters.

The Stargate has been inactive for a year -- until it is activated, and a bunch of Egyptian-styled warriors come through and kidnap a young officer. General Hammond (Don S. Davis) pulls Jack O'Neill (Richard Dean Anderson) out of retirement to learn what really happened on the planet of Abydos, and where these mysterious aliens have come from.

O'Neill and a small team go to Abydos and find Daniel Jackson (Michael Shanks) who has been learning about a vast network of Stargates over the past year. But when Daniel's wife Sha're and brother-in-law Skaara are abducted by the same warriors, O'Neill, Jackson and Air Force scientist Sam Carter (Amanda Tapping) use the Stargate to venture to where they're being kept.

What they find is an alien race who inhabits human hosts, the Goa'uld, and their ruthless slave warriors, the Jaffa. Carter, O'Neill and Jackson are captured by the powerful Apophis -- but to escape, they must have the help of an unlikely ally: Teal'c (Christopher Judge), Apophis' First Prime. Since Earth has now annoyed the Goa'uld, several exploration teams are formed to go through the Stargate and find weapons and allies.

And SG-1 -- Carter, O'Neill, Jackson and Teal'c -- encounters some very strange problems: a plague that turns people into savages, a people who live only a hundred days, a Viking planet, a Stargate explorer stranded since 1945, a little girl turned into a bomb, the seductive Goa'uld queen Hathor, and coming back as robots. And when the military shuts down the SG program, Daniel reveals that the Earth is about to be destroyed by Apophis' armies...

The first season of "Stargate SG-1" isn't the most impressive, though the last three episodes hint at the series' future greatness. And thankfully, it drops the usual space opera stuff -- instead we get Stargates, real military, and a very plausible reason why everybody in the galaxy (more or less) looks just like us.

It's graced with kitschy Egyptian-styled sets, lots of shoot-em-up action from Marines and Air Force, and plenty of planets influenced by Earth cultures, like the Minoans and the Vikings. Best of all is the snappy dialogue, mostly from the tart-tongued O'Neill ("Temperature--ground 1700 degrees Fahrenheit. Air--seems to be in pockets, ranging from 1500 degrees down to 200." "Sounds like LA").

And the makers add some poignant and/or warm scenes, such as the eager Abydonian teenagers celebrating with O'Neill and his pals, Teal'c reunion with his outcast family, or Sam bonding with a doomed little girl. All the characters get these moments, which really makes them seem human.

Instead of Kurt Russell's suicidal O'Neill from the movie, Anderson does a quirky, disrespectful, pop culture-lovin' guy with a hidden tragic past -- his "Cold Lazarus"double role is one of the best of the show. Tapping and Shanks are also great, as an enthusiastic geek and a smart, capable military woman. Sadly Judge gets shortchanged as the stern, honorable Teal'c, but he's brilliant when he's spotlighted.

The first season of "Stargate SG-1" is not the best of the series, but it's still a solid, imaginative sci-fi story with some great writing and even better acting. A must-have for sci-fi buffs.
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on 17 July 2004
This DVD contains the start (double episode) and end (three episodes) of series 1. The first episode is an expanded version of what I remember, and other reviews have commented about that. I like this version. This is a good series, which manages to end the episode with enough of a cliff hanger to make you want to see the next episode, which isn't on the DVD. The same problem exists with the last three episodes, whose story arc ends on the next season, and therefore isn't on the DVD. As a result the DVD isn't all that satisfying as is. Technically, this isn't a "best of" DVD, as it claims to be, but just the start and end of the season. Politics is a boring episode, mainly showing parts of previous episodes, and while it serves to give a glimpse of what's missing from the DVD, I skipped most of it.
The DVD itself is a pretty sorry example of its kind. First of all, the video quality is one of the worst I've seen. It's very grainy and quite distracting at times. The box says "widescreen version" but apart from the menu, it was fullscreen (this may be Amazon's fault -- the DVD wasn't shrink wrapped, unlike others, so it's possible that it's the wrong box). There are no extras, and it's even impossible to move from one episode to the next by skipping to the next chapter, which is what I usually do when I don't want to see the end credits. At least there are subtitles for the hearing impaired (which, as sometimes happens with DVDs, take an occasional license to deviate a bit from the actual words being said).
I bought this DVD on a sale at Amazon, and for that price I think it's decent value. The normal price seems too high to me for the value that this DVD provides. It allowed me to refresh my memory about the first season, and was enjoyable for that. It's also a good way to tie in to the second season for those who want to buy just the second. However, I doubt there are many such people. Most people would prefer buying the complete first season, which provides over four times the number of episodes for a little over twice the price.
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