Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Fire Kids Edition Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
13
4.8 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

TOP 100 REVIEWERon 26 September 2005
I recently purchased this film from Amazon as well as "The Alec Guinness Collection" which includes Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) plus four others: The Man in the White Suit (1951), The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), The Captain's Paradise (1953), and The Ladykillers (1955). Frankly, I was amazed how well each of the six films has held up since I first saw it.
This film is based on a novel by Joyce Carey, The Horse's Mouth. Guinness wrote the screenplay which was nominated for an Academy Award. The director was Ronald Neame who also produced it. Special credit should also be given to the cinematographer, Arthur Ibbetson, who brilliantly captures the beauty of London while sustaining the viewer's focus on both the splendor and squalor of Gulley Jimson's passions. For me, Guinness' portrayal of that aging and impoverished but obsessed painter gives a whole new meaning to the word "eccentric." As in the novel, the spirit of William Blake is very evident. Art is Jimson's religion for which he is not only willing but eager to make whatever sacrifice may be necessary, his or another's. There are both lambs and tigers in Blake's world. As portrayed by Guinness, Jimson seems to combine their dominant characteristics in his own personality and behavior.
Members of the supporting cast are outstanding, notably Mike Morgan (Nosey) and Kay Walsh (Coker) who remain devoted to Jimson throughout his constant use and abuse of them. I hasten to add that, after recently watching this bittersweet film again, I found its several comic moments hilarious. The best of Guinness' comic films always include special "touches" which enrich their appeal. Whether it was his idea or Neame's (or theirs together), clever use is made of Sergei Prokofiev's "Lieutenant Kije" suite throughout the film. I am unable to explain why so few people who claim to be "film buffs" know about this classic...nor why even fewer people have seen it.
0Comment| 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 May 2014
If you know this film then you'll need no review. This is a nice DVD version - the Criterion Collection are normally a cut above the standard releases but many are only available in Region 1. This plays well on my Region 2 player - colours and crispness of image are superb. Alec Guinness and Ernest Thesiger on great form and great to see London in the 1950s.
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
I have been trying for so long to purchase,purloin or copy this film for 3 &a half decades & I'm glad that search is over. This film is a snapshot of bohemian London before the sixties took over & as far as I am concerned one of Alec Guinness's best films ever.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 January 2015
Have been after this DVD for some time
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 October 2015
Fabulous rendition of Joyce Cary's last novel in a trilogy. Unusual character of somewhat crazy iconoclastic painter played by Alec Guiness. Some hilarious scenes.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 November 2015
I find it a rather overwrought piece which, whilst having its moments (mostly when Kay Walsh is on the screen bringing some sort of believability and pathos to the film) is in thrall to the modish idea of the artist's pre-eminence. It might have its satiric prods at the artistic sensibility but doesn't seem to, ultimately, have any doubts about the importance of trying to convey your vision, and living like you want to, however selfish and destructive. I suppose that's a tenable view and we all have our heroes who we'd somehow vicariously cheer on, but I'm not sure it'd be Gully Jimson. Perhaps that's the point, but I think it's made unconvincingly. Maybe it's also a matter of taste: the Bratby paintings are a bit hideous. I prefer The Rebel or Andrei Rublev: this sits in a halfway house; half-realist and half-surreal and possibly half-baked.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 June 2014
This lived up to all the hype and should be in everybody's Guinness collection....a real gem and a splendid script
which also shows what a brilliant talent Alec was. In my top 50 movies of all time.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 March 2016
I enjoyed this film when I first saw it in 1960.
Good to watch it again.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 February 2017
I loved it... I love Alec Guinness . You cant beat the classic actors
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
A masterpiece !!!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse