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on 7 June 2017
Great interpretation, and the cast is just so good, who can resist? Helena Bonham Carter is amazing, but Nigel Hawthorne is the real star. He should be knighted! Oh hang on, he was! Well done Sir Nigel!

Trevor Nunn obviously worked really hard to make sure this worked as a film in it's own right, not just the play welded to the cinema. I can imagine many people enjoying this who have never seen a Shakespeare play, and wouldn't even want to. Highly recommended!
5 people found this helpful
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on 11 September 2017
This was very enjoyable with a quality cast aided by fine rural and coastal views. It seems totally appropriate to set the action on the Cornish peninsula to represent the fictional Illyrian coast, and choose the stately home of Lanhydrock for much of the action. The casting of the twins Viola and Sebastian is extremely well done as they are made to look so alike. Special mention must be made of the acting excellence of Nigel Hawthorne, Ben Kingsley and Helena Bonham Carter. The remaining cast are similarly very good and the comic interludes are expertly supplied by Richard E Grant and Mel Smith. It's hard to imagine the play done any better.
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on 27 June 2017
Good adaptation with a great cast. Obviously deviates from the original at times, as do all adaptations, but can definitely enjoyed in its own right.
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on 23 February 2012
Superbly cast and brilliantly directed by Trevor Nunn (NOT "Helena Bonham Carter"!), this works brilliantly for both Shakespeare addicts and those new to his plays. While there's perhaps a little TOO much riding backwards and forwards between the households, the characterisation is faultless. Helena B-C is delightful as the young woman slowly emerging from her self-indulgent grieving, and it's a pleasure to see Olivia played as someone the same age (-ish) as Cesario, instead of the usual stately aristocrat, while Imogen Stubbs is moving as the unselfish Viola, forced to woo on behalf of the man she herself loves. Ben Kingsley is superb as Feste, not just because of his beautiful singing, but also for his ability to gaze silently into the camera while we try to guess at his thoughts; and Nigel Hawthorn's ever-so-slightly skewed vowels brilliantly suggest the social climber who isn't quite as secure in his aspirations as he'd like to be. The whole cast is flawless; and best of all is the final recognition scene, when Viola and Sebastian are at last reunited: Trevor Nunn's expert pacing of this makes for a heart-stopping climax. I can watch this again and again.
Marianne W
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on 17 October 2017
Excellent. No matter how many times I watch it
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on 24 May 2017
Wonderful film - such a great way to let all the family enjoy Shakespeare. Very funny play well interpreted.
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on 13 March 2018
Boring. The usual toffs acting cultured! Fell asleep. DVD from seller in good condition and was delivered quickly.
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on 25 August 2014
A great film, good screenplay (a pragmatic remix of the play but faithful in the details), good folksy soundtrack, splendidly acted, but rather let down by a poor transfer to DVD. This is 4:3 letterboxed, not anamorphic, so the definition is poor and on a widescreen TV you are prone to get a large black border all around the image. Worse still the video looks like it has had a rather bruising fight with a videotape recorder at some point. And no subtitles available, which surely would have been very helpful for anyone who is studying the work or hearing the text for the first time.

If you can bear these niggles, then a good watch in the round. A new digital transfer one day, direct from a film print, would be lovely!
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on 17 January 2014
this is set in Cornish scenery and somehow it expands the play. It is conducted like victorian melodrama in period costumes of that era which makes Malvolio's cross gartering even more hilarious. What surprises me is that it never made it to the TV screens for twelfth night to round off Xmas on 6 january.
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on 15 October 2017
A superb version of 12th Night, but why oh why do so many British DVDs not have subtitles? I have poor hearing and need them
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