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Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
18
Songs In Red And Gray
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£25.00+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 8 September 2016
Great album, excellent service
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on 23 August 2015
A brilliant album.
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on 13 July 2015
perfect as described
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on 28 February 2014
The CD I ordered arrived OK, but it was an "On Demand CD' and the printing of the artwork was very poor.
This was never advertised as an on demand CD (the manufacturer prints the inlay card themselves).
Poor for £13.00.
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on 19 October 2014
Excellent album.
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on 25 June 2015
great
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on 4 May 2004
I have loved Suzanne Vega ever since I was a kid and saw a video for "Luka" on TV. There was something about this porcelain-skinned girl with her pensive eyes and understated voice that caught my attention, even though I was just twelve years old and couldn't speak a word of English. So "Solitude Standing" became the first LP I ever owned, and since then her music has followed me throughout the years.
Her new album, "Songs in Red and Gray" somehow marks a return to the music that first got me listening to her - not that she ever really departed from the folk-tinged but still distinctly urban singer-songwriter material. And hey, this is Suzanne Vega we're talking about, so of course the lyrics play a big part. They deal mostly with the break-up of her marriage - apparently, she stayed at home for a year and just wrote, finally surfacing in the small Green Village clubs where she started out once upon a time, and tried the songs out on her old mates. "If I Were A Weapon" is a great example of stringent song-writing, where she demonstrates how to use a metaphor without coming over all Dido-esque (sorry, Dido is my pet peeve) and who else could devote a whole song to playing solitaire on the computer?
The thing I like so much about Suzanne is that she can get results with small means - she never sounds overblown or melodramatic, and still her songs possess great emotion. It's her warm voice coupled with a cool detached eye that does it: just listen to the quietly perceptive "Last Years' Troubles" or the evocative "Widow's Walk" and you'll see what I mean.
One tip to her fans: do catch her live if you have the chance. I am always a bit wary of concerts, since I'm afraid of being disappointed. (Rickie Lee Jones, for instance, is wonderful on vinyl but the sourest pill EVER on stage.) But Suzanne has a great warmth and generosity about her that translates even into an audience of 200+.
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on 15 September 2016
I think this has to be my favourite Suzanne Vega album...full of glorious tunes. Track 6 "Songs in Red and Gray" never fails to enchant me...haunting music and poetic lyrics...I just love "Soap and Water" with its heart-breaking lyrics and "I'll Never Be Your Maggie May" is Suzanne Vega at her best
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on 30 December 2002
Since her eponymous debut album in 1985 Suzanne Vega has developed her unique talent with a succession of excellent albums.
'Songs in Red and Gray' is Suzanne's first album since 'Nine Objects of Desire' in 1996 and represents something of a return to her roots and her strengths. Gone is the playful experimentation of Nine Objects, replaced with a more restrained and subtle production from Rupert Hine and a new sense of emotion from Suzanne's vocal performance.
The theme and tone of this album was effectively set by the unfortunate break up of Suzanne's marriage. It is a tribute to her talent and resilience that she has been able to create such superb music from such personal heartache.
Typically, Suzanne eschews playing the blame game over her personal problems and instead deconstructs her feelings and lays them bare in her songs. The quality of the lyrics is outstanding throughout and the songs 'Penitent' and '(I'll Never Be) Your Maggie May' are the equal of anything she has ever created before.
If you are already a fan then there is no doubt that you will enjoy this album. If you particularly enjoy Suzanne's acoustic guitar-driven songs with astute lyrical observations then it is pure heaven!
Thank you Suzanne for over 15 years of listening pleasure!
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VINE VOICEon 21 October 2005
Never has a failed relationship been dissected and analysed at such a level and in such a brilliant fashion as on this masterpiece by Vega. Quietly, yet cuttingly, she strips away the easy answers and trite arguments that hide the pain and anxiety of loss and in their place formulates a fiercely petulant, but sympathetic response to the damage done to the ego and those around her. It is Vega stripped bare. It can be wincingly painful to listen to at times, but also sharply funny as in "I'll Never be Your Maggie May." Unfortunately overlooked since its release, this work is a triumph of songwriting and performance.
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