Learn more Download now Shop now Pre-order now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 9 May 2017
Such a long time since I saw last. Retains much of it's appeal, but a few elements have aged not so well and now come across as a bit cheesey. strong cast (irrespective of age) and direction with mainly a good script keeps your attention and builds interest in the characters. The Shepard character however is a little too cliched. Not so much a story rather a compendium of events mainly around themes of desire, sex and regret. the style much seen through the 70s and later.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 22 July 2017
A classic
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 July 2017
good
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 17 November 2017
great
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 3 December 2017
Wonderful film. Stay with this one, it’s a gem
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 5 May 2017
Great movie!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 5 June 2017
Brilliant film of a nostalgic time.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 January 2018
Epic
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 9 August 2008
Set in a dusty ,desolate, fictional town called Anarene, Peter Bogdanovich's 'The Last Picture Show' is a nostalgic and bittersweet tale of growing up in 1950's small town Texas. Filmed entirely in black and white to major effect it follows the lives, trials and tribulations of the habitants of Anarene. The movie begins and ends with slow moving camera shots of the cafe, pool hall and picture house - three buildings which are at the heart of the film.The main characters which drive the movie along are High School graduates Sonny (Timothy Bottoms), Duane (Jeff Bridges) and the flirting, teasing Jacy (Cybil Shepard) whose virginity every boy in the town wants to take. Other notable characters are the school basketball coach Popper, (who's wife Ruth has an affair with Sonny) ,Sam The Lion - brilliantly played by Ben Johnson who receives an oscar for his role, and Billy, a developmentally disabled kid who is cruelly taken towards the end of the film in one of a number of moving scenes.
Music also plays a huge part in the film as there aren't many scenes throughout the film when a radio isn't heard in the background playing the music of Hank Williams, Hank Snow and other country singers of the time.
A brilliant and touching movie.
0Comment| 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
TOP 50 REVIEWERon 24 July 2013
The Last Picture Show is one of those films you can go back to always with the same pleasure without quite knowing what it is that is so pleasing; furthermore it remains in the mind for days afterwards and makes you feel a surge of happiness whenever you think of it. Is it Timothy Bottoms' sad eyes, his groping, always very human interactions with others? Or Ellen Burstyn's bored but resigned Lois, who likewise burns with a fire life can't match? Or Ben Johnson's understated warmth beneath a patrician exterior? Or perhaps it's the sense of place - Anarene, Texas in 1952 is certainly a backwater which people can only dream of getting away from, yet its broad windswept square, with the picture house at the end of one side, pool hall and bar, has a certain magic as shot here in black and white, with fifties songs continually playing on radios in the background. For many it would be Cybill Shepherd's Jacy who will be the focal point, as she certainly is for the young men in the film, yet she too is not able to find any happiness and her toying with boys is very ambiguous - in many ways she's not very likeable, but there's also a sense that she may have some kind of block against actually following through with anything. Sad though it is to see Sonny (Bottoms) unable to resist her charms and somewhat mistreat an older woman as a result (the memorable Cloris Leachman), it also rings completely true in a way that goes beyond blaming, while Duane's feeling for her really does seem to persist and almost redeems him, inadequate though he is in most ways except his good looks (again very well played, by Jeff Bridges - Bogdanovich says he cast him because he was such an amiable guy it would present an interesting take on a flawed character). There's also a heartrending silent role for Sam Bottoms, real-life brother of Timothy, who got into the film quite by accident ... And the brilliant Eileen Brennan, memorably flipping burgers and world-weary, but the kind of person who enhances life all the same. The film keeps hitting the note of truth in a way that can't be put into words, but is clearly felt. The pacing is absolutely superb, and its tone, somewhere between a humanist benevolence and elegiac sense of life's disappointment, is something to wonder at over and over.
0Comment| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse


Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)