Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Fitbit

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
25
4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
18
4 star
7
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£9.50+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

It's 1975 and a young Graham Parker is bored to distraction feeding go-go juice to gas guzzlers on the forecourt of a London Petrol Station. He puts the smelly grubby nozzle back in its equally scuzzy slot for the last time, toddles off home, pens a few caustic tunes in his bedsit about love, drugs and emotional insanity - then sets off to gain instant fame and fortune (well fame anyway).

Like so many Rock Kids of a certain age who remember the advent of Punk and New Wave (and welcomed much of it) – it's always struck me as odd that genuine musical talent like say Nick Lowe and Graham Parker weren't and aren't utterly huge? I mean where’s the statue citizens of Chobham in Surrey for your musical son – eh? I can remember when Parker's albums were simply three and four-pound fodder in every secondhand shop. Well maybe these 2001 Remasters of his blistering 70t's catalogue can put pay to that short sightedness for good - because his 1976 debut is a total winner you need in your life. Here are the in-your-face 'Soul Shoes'...

UK released July 2001 – "Howlin Wind" by GRAHAM PARKER on Mercury 548 667-2 (Barcode 731454866729) is an 'Expanded Edition' CD Remaster with one Bonus Track and plays out as follows (45:11 minutes):

1. White Honey
2. Nothing's Gonna Pull Us Apart
3. Silly Thing
4. Gypsy Blood
5. Between You And Me
6. Back To Schooldays
7. Soul Shoes [Side 2]
8. Lady Doctor
9. You've Got To Be Kidding
10. Howlin' Wind
11. Not if It Pleases Me
12. Don't Ask Me No Questions
Tracks 1 to 12 are his debut LP "Howlin Wind" – released April 1976 in the UK on Vertigo 6360 129 and in the USA on Mercury SRM-1 1095

BONUS TRACK:
13. I’m Gonna Use It Now – non-album B-side of "Silly Thing" issued as his debut UK 7” single in March 1976 on Mercury 6059 135

GRAHAM PARKER – Lead Vocals, Acoustic Guitar and Rhythm Guitar on "Howlin' Wind"

THE RUMOUR was:
BRINSLEY SCHWARZ – Guitar, Hammond Organ, Tenor Saxes and Backing Vocals
BOB ANDREWS – Lowrey And Hammond Organ, Piano and backing Vocals
MARTIN BELMONT – Guitar and backing Vocals
ANDREW BODNAR - Bass
STEVE GOULDING – Drums and backing Vocals

GUESTS:
ED DEAN – Slide Guitar on "Soul Shoes"
DAVE EDMUNDS – Rockabilly Guitar on "Back To Schooldays"
NOEL BROWN – Dobro Guitar on "Not If It Pleases Me" and Slide Guitar on "Back To Schooldays"
STEWART LYNAS – Alto Sax on "Lady Doctor" and Arranged All Brass
HERSHALL HOLDER – Trumpet
DAVE CONNERS – First Tenor Sax
BRINSLEY SCHWARZ – Second Tenor Sax
DANNY ELLIS – Trombone
JOHN (VISCOUNT) EARLE – Baritone Sax

The '25th Anniversary Reissues' sticker on the CD jewel case promises 'Bonus Tracks, New Sleeve Notes & Expanded Artwork'. Once you open the decidedly skimpy three-way foldout inlay – you know that Universal has gone all ASDA budget range on our Graham. There are new paragraphs from the great man alongside some history of the album by NIGEL WILLIAMSON and one lone bonus track as you can see above. It's good but hardly great – and surely there were outtakes to be had after all these years? But all that budget-priced gripe goes out the boozer window when you hear the muscle and clarity of the Remaster by GARY MOORE...

There are tracks on "Howlin Wind" that have needed a bit of 'oomph' for years – "Soul Shoes", "Back To Schooldays" and the sadly lovely "Between Me And You" jump to mind. But the improvement is all over. The brilliant build of instruments in the acidic "Not If It Pleases Me" comes at you with incredible power (a forgotten nugget methinks). The perky opener "White Honey" sounds really fantastic (for a song about cocaine that is) and should have been the album's lead-off single instead of Vertigo's choice of the weaker but safer "Silly Thing". The acoustic beginning to "Gypsy Blood" is warm to these tired lugs and when the Rumour do kick in – the whole soundstage has real power without being overly bombastic (gorgeous acoustic playing in this song by Parker). I'm jumping around the room like a snotty brat with a day pass to Rowntrees as the brilliant and rebellious bopper "Back To Schooldays" fills my room – Dave Edmunds giving it some wicked Rockabilly Guitar just when the song needs it. Parker's vocals naturally suit the choppy-angry New Wave rhythms of "Don't Ask Me Questions" – but then like all great songwriters – he floors you with real emotion and pathos. Disguised behind the almost sing-along Eagles rhythm of "Between You And Me" is a razor blade – a song about love and bitter loss. I’ve loved this poison-berry of a melody for four decades now and like much of this brilliant album – still feels fresh and vital in 2016.

In his typically self-deprecating liner notes - Graham Parker reckons that his "Howlin Wind" LP 'was the best album released in the UK in 1976' outside of all that commercial singles chart fodder. On the evidence presented here – the angry Pump Attendant may indeed have a point. Brilliant...
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 28 October 2013
I felt nigh-on compelled to write this review of Graham Parker & The Rumour's magnificent 1976 debut album for two main reasons. First, it completes my reviews of the man's outstanding first four albums (this plus Heat Treatment, Stick To Me and Squeezing Out Sparks) with his ace backing band. Second, the review is also in celebration at just having witnessed the band on their 'UK comeback tour' at the Shepherd's Bush Empire on Saturday (the first time they've played the UK in over 30 years!). Now, the gig was not perfect, the odd bum note, some distorted sound, and heat unlike anything I've experienced since 1977 Generation X Marquee days - but overall a very emotional experience (a long emotional ride, if you like) for both audience and band alike.

In fact, two highlights of the gig were the inclusion in the encores of two songs from this debut - the foot-stomping (or, at least, tapping) Soul Shoes and the magnificent, one might say (literally) heavenly, Don't Ask Me Questions (as we the crowd, with hands raised and fingers pointing, sought solace from the powers above), in what, for me, is one of Parker's greatest ever songs and (along with the Clash's version of Police And Thieves) one of finest of all reggae-inspired songs (and, to boot, featuring the flying Fender of Martin Belmont). It was also pleasing to see that the man still retains this album's title song in his current live set, as it contains one of Parker's most passionately soulful vocals (and he's done a few of those) and some typically dextrous ivory tinkling from Bob Andrews.

Elsewhere, Howlin' Wind provides ample evidence of the quality, and diversity, of Parker's songwriting, from the rock n' roll of Back To Schooldays, vibrant soul of White Honey, sublime melody of Nothin's Gonna Pull Us Apart, You've Got To Be Kidding and Between You And Me (the latter song being one of the man's most understated and, for me greatest, compositions), corny romanticism (I always remember Belmont's live introduction, '.....we're gonna slow it down a bit now...this one's for the ladies...') of Gypsy Blood, through to the swinging blues of Silly Thing, Not If It Pleases Me and Lady Doctor.

Although I must admit I have a slight preference for the three albums that followed, this debut remains a great record and established, in my book, one of the greatest of all (not just British) songwriters. It's just such a shame that it's taken him so long to reunite this great band!
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
It's 1975 and a young Graham Parker is bored to distraction feeding go-go juice to gas guzzlers on the forecourt of a London Petrol Station. He puts the smelly grubby nozzle back in its equally scuzzy slot for the last time, toddles off home, pens a few caustic tunes in his bedsit about love, drugs and emotional insanity - then sets off to gain instant fame and fortune (well fame anyway).

Like so many Rock Kids of a certain age who remember the advent of Punk and New Wave (and welcomed much of it) – it's always struck me as odd that genuine musical talent like say Nick Lowe and Graham Parker weren't and aren't utterly huge? I mean where’s the statue citizens of Chobham in Surrey for your musical son – eh?. I can remember when Parker's albums were simply three and four-pound fodder in every secondhand shop. Well maybe the 2001 Remasters of his blistering 70ts catalogue can put pay to that short sightedness for good because his 1976 debut is a total winner you need in your life. Here are the Soul Shoes in your face (please don't let the Fuzz in)...

UK released July 2001 – "Howlin Wind" by GRAHAM PARKER on Mercury 548 667-2 (Barcode 731454866729) is an 'Expanded Edition' CD Remaster with one Bonus Track and plays out as follows (45:11 minutes):

1. White Honey
2. Nothing's Gonna Pull Us Apart
3. Silly Thing
4. Gypsy Blood
5. Between You And Me
6. Back To Schooldays
7. Soul Shoes [Side 2]
8. Lady Doctor
9. You've Got To Be Kidding
10. Howlin' Wind
11. Not if It Pleases Me
12. Don't Ask Me No Questions
Tracks 1 to 12 are his debut LP "Howlin Wind" – released April 1976 in the UK on Vertigo 6360 129 and in the USA on Mercury SRM-1 1095

BONUS TRACK:
13. I’m Gonna Use It Now – non-album B-side of "Silly Thing" issued as his debut UK 7” single in March 1976 on Mercury 6059 135

GRAHAM PARKER – Lead Vocals, Acoustic Guitar and Rhythm Guitar on "Howlin' Wind"

THE RUMOUR was:
BRINSLEY SCHWARZ – Guitar, Hammond Organ, Tenor Saxes and Backing Vocals
BOB ANDREWS – Lowrey And Hammond Organ, Piano and backing Vocals
MARTIN BELMONT – Guitar and backing Vocals
ANDREW BODNAR - Bass
STEVE GOULDING – Drums and backing Vocals

GUESTS:
ED DEAN – Slide Guitar on "Soul Shoes"
DAVE EDMUNDS – Rockabilly Guitar on "Back To Schooldays"
NOEL BROWN – Dobro Guitar on "Not If It Pleases Me" and Slide Guitar on "Back To Schooldays"
STEWART LYNAS – Alto Sax on "Lady Doctor" and Arranged All Brass
HERSHALL HOLDER – Trumpet
DAVE CONNERS – First Tenor Sax
BRINSLEY SCHWARZ – Second Tenor Sax
DANNY ELLIS – Trombone
JOHN (VISCOUNT) EARLE – Baritone Sax

The '25th Anniversary Reissues' sticker on the CD jewel case promises 'Bonus Tracks, New Sleeve Notes & Expanded Artwork'. Once you open the decidedly skimpy three-way foldout inlay – you know that Universal has gone all ASDA budget range on our Graham. There are new paragraphs from the great man alongside some history of the album by NIGEL WILLIAMSON and one lone bonus track as you can see above. It's good but hardly great – and surely there were outtakes to be had after all these years? But all that budget-priced gripe goes out the boozer window when you hear the muscle and clarity of the Remaster by GARY MOORE...

There are tracks on "Howlin Wind" that have needed a bit of 'oomph' for years – "Soul Shoes", "Back To Schooldays" and the sadly lovely "Between Me And You" jump to mind. But the improvement is all over. The brilliant build of instruments in the acidic "Not If It Pleases Me" comes at you with incredible power (a forgotten nugget methinks). The perky opener "White Honey" sounds really fantastic (for a song about cocaine that is) and should have been the album's lead-off single instead of Vertigo's choice of the weaker but safer "Silly Thing". The acoustic beginning to "Gypsy Blood" is warm to these tired lugs and when the Rumour do kick in – the whole soundstage has real power without being overly bombastic (gorgeous acoustic playing in this song by Parker). I'm jumping around the room like a snotty brat with a day pass to Rowntrees as the brilliant and rebellious bopper "Back To Schooldays" fills my room – Dave Edmunds giving it some wicked Rockabilly Guitar just when the song needs it. Parker's vocals naturally suit the choppy-angry New Wave rhythms of "Don't Ask Me Questions" – but then like all great songwriters – he floors you with real emotion and pathos. Disguised behind the almost sing-along Eagles rhythm of "Between You And Me" is a razor blade – a song about love and bitter loss. I’ve loved this poison-berry of a melody for four decades now and like much of this brilliant album – still feels fresh and vital in 2016.

In his typically self-deprecating liner notes - Graham Parker reckons that his "Howlin Wind" LP 'was the best album released in the UK in 1976' outside of all that commercial singles chart fodder. On the evidence presented here – the angry Pump Attendant may indeed have a point. Brilliant...
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 March 2010
Talk of the Mid 1970's music wise and everyone thinks Punk
But in this post - progressive age, there was an equally large musical boom ...Rhythm and Blues influenced ..of real songs and people who could really play : Think as starters Dr Feelgood , Thin Lizzy, Ian Drury , Elvis Costello , Southside Johnny , Tom Petty ...
And then think Graham Parker and the Rumour ...
Howlin' Wind was the first album. Great songs distil and crystallise numerous influences ...of the Stones , Dylan , Van Morrison , and Soul
It kicks off with `White Honey' a soul number which sparkles with the clarity of Booker T. & the M.Gs' Green onions , and ends with an excellent reggae based `Don't ask me questions' . In between are a few geat rockers , melodies and songs that really make you sing and dance .
The Rumour are as good a band as you can get, as tight as Little Feat at the finest , and Nick Lowe's production is really excellent
On the basis that 5 stars are for really groundbreaking or exceptional albums, I would give this 4.5. But have rounded this up, as for those for whom the influences ring true, this is music that must be listened to .
0Comment| 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 April 2013
I bought 'Parkerilla' on vinyl back when it first came out on the strength of 'Hey Lord, don't ask me questions, but I'm afraid the rest of the album didn't jell with my then Punk sensibility. 30 odd years later and I still have 'Hey Lord' running round in my head and after reading the other reviews of this album here I decided to take a punt, the version of 'Hey Lord' is a very different one to 'Parkerilla's' but still a standout track. As for the rest of the album, there's not a bum track on it; a mix of white soul, 'White honey' is another stand out track, rock and ersatz country. It's no real mystery why this album or Parker himself didn't make it bigger, they came along at the wrong time; which is a crying shame. This is a stand out album that deserves a wider audience. Buy it, you won't regret it.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 November 2013
I have Heat Treatment and The Up Escalator on vinyl plus the budget introductory cd. I bought this however,recently from Amazon and am catching up with mr P after his later... performance (thanks Jools) . the "rumour" that this was a great album is thankfully very true. It set me to wondering how come I didn't buy it years ago ?! Graham and the boys look a lot different nowadays... but don't we all? The sound is very familiar (in the best way) long may they continue.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 July 2013
The album that brought us Don't Ask me Questions brings us so much more. This is such a great album that gets more plays from me now than when it came out. A timeless classic
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 June 2012
So there was no way that I would get excited about this guy. It was the seventies and here was a little English dude who looked like a denim lounge lizard but needs must. To get inside the mind space of a girl I was in lust with, I bought a vinyl copy of this and prepared to be dissapointed. Ahem! I was very, very wrong-on all counts. It cooked, it hummed and sure on vinyl I only ever played side two from Lady Doctor on. The little man had a big voice and Brinsley Schwarz licked that guitar like a man on a mission. Now I'm an old codger, it remains a favourite. Even the white boy soul of the first seven tracks makes for good listening. But I concur that the show stopper remains 'Dont ask me no questions'- Parker snarls, the guitar whines the band thumps along. Probably wouldn't be asking myself. Can't say there was anything better he did following this but a gem is a gem and worth every star of the five.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 May 2013
See review for Heat Treatment,same thing.Have had on vinyl since its release,the man is a genius........replacing vinyl for cd's has (like many other people)cost me a fortune..................
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 January 2013
Worth buying to finally appreciate Parker's writing and signing abilities. Did not receive the recognition it desrved at the time but better late than never. Hopefully will introduce a new audience to his music as well as allow some of us the replace our scatched vinyl copies !
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Customers also viewed these items

£5.43
£8.12

Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)