Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Fitbit



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 20 June 2017
I like this CD, but then I like country rock which is what this Grateful Dead album is. If you like country rock of the 60's you should like this.
Tracks: 1 Box of Rain, 2 Friend of the Devil, 3 Sugar Magnolia, 4 Operator, 5 Candyman, 6 Ripple, 7 Brokedown Palace 8 Till the Morning Comes
9 Attics of My Life 10 Truckin' all tracks written by members of the band.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 October 2011
As a relatively recent convert to the music of the Grateful Dead, I've grown to love the rich diversity of this great band's music, from the psychedelic output of the 1960's, with those wonderfully eclectic elongated jams, through to the dawn of the 1970's with the delights of "Workingman's Dead", then on to this album.

There's no fillers here, as the band's collaboration with songwriter Robert Hunter yields another great collection, a selection of blues-tinged country compositions. Its easy to see why the versatile Jerry Garcia is held in such high esteem, his contribution here (as usual) is superb, an example being his acoustic guitar picking on "Friend Of The Devil" which is a delight, but I'm certainly not overlooking the great contribution from the rest of the band.
Its sometimes said that the band's vocals lack power, and that may be so, but personally I don't want to be blown out of my chair with powerhouse vocals when listening to these songs, I find the vocals here to be sensitive and emotional, and blend perfectly with the often beautiful and tender music/lyrics.

My favourite tracks are "Box Of Rain" - the personal pain behind Phil Lesh's aching vocals add extra emotion and poignancy to this classic opening track. Then "Friend Of The Devil". Also the truly beautiful "Ripple" with it's moving lyrics and vocals. The catchy "Truckin" is an uplifting foot-tapper. A great album from a uniquely special band, an album that still sounds fresh over forty years after it's release.
0Comment| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 July 2017
classic album, great retro repress on thick vinyl, feels like an original release.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 April 2017
Grateful Dead weren't to my taste as a teenager, but I've grown into them! Brought to my attention by the excellent Day of the Dead box set curated by The National
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 June 2017
So love this lp
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 May 2017
wow
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 February 2017
Quite possibly the greatest rock album of all time. This album can change your life. Life is simply better when you are listening to this.
11 Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 12 January 2008
Three months after Workingman's Dead reached the shops, the Dead were in the studios for the second time that year, at Wally Heider's in San Francisco, to record its sequel, American Beauty, making 1970 probably the high water mark as far as their studio work is concerned. It was a time when a number of American-based musicians such as Dylan and the Band, the Byrds, the Flying Burritos, Ry Cooder, Van Morrison and others had been rediscovering their country's musical roots, unplugging their guitars and adding fiddles and button accordions to forge a new Americana. It was natural that the Dead should be associated with this movement since they had been long term students of folk, blues, jug band and bluegrass music even before they had begun their psychedelic explorations in the mid-sixties.

In Workingman's Dead they had shown themselves to be highly adept at mastering the demands of these structured and mostly acoustic musical forms with a collection of brilliant new songs, and the self-produced American Beauty, which came out in November 1970, proved that this was no fluke. If anything, the songs on American Beauty are even stronger and equally timeless.

Furthermore, the music is beautifully recorded by engineer Steve Barncard, with deep clarity and resonance, in a way that would expose any flaws or weaknesses in the singing and playing, should there have been any. The performances were live in the studio, with restrained overdubs added to the basic tracks by Jerry Garcia and guest musicians, and is a testament to their proficiency. The songs, with Robert Hunter's exquisite lyrics, are allowed to speak for themselves, with very little soloing, and Jerry Garcia mostly using his pedal steel guitar in place of his normal electric 6-string.

Songs such as Friend Of The Devil and Bob Weir's Sugar Magnolia became staples of the band's live repertoire, and edited versions of Truckin' and the very beautiful Ripple were released on a single in January 1971 to become their biggest selling single to date. This is one of the most essential of all Grateful Dead albums.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 January 2001
With the magificent Ripple and a series of other acoustic tracks this album is one of the all-time greats of the American 60's. It evokes another time, of long hair, harmonies and warm Californian nights. If you ever wondered why and when the Grateful Dead attained the status of near-legend, listen to this.
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 April 2009
This is my first album review. I didn't choose to do this album first because it has some kind of special significance to me or anything, I've chosen it because I just spent the evening learning Ripple on the guitar; a fantastic song that anyone taking the time to read Grateful Dead reviews should probably own.

It is my first Dead album, I've only had it for a few weeks, and I don't yet feel know enough about them to write an in-depth review, but I know enough about music to recognise it's a good album.

Ripple's not the only good song, I'm currently enjoying Box of Rain, Friend of the Devil, Sugar Magnolia, Candyman & Till the Morning Comes as well. The only thing that lets it down is sometimes the lyrics lack a bit of subtlety. The melodies, harmonies and compositions though are top notch.

Overall the album has left me intrigued, and I'm loving Jerry Garcia's voice and guitaring. I will definitely be getting some more Grateful Dead, and with time this album will probably be 5*.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items

£7.24
£8.56

Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)