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4.1 out of 5 stars
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4.1 out of 5 stars
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on 6 May 2015
This is the limited edition digi pack version of "Digimortal" and it has 4 bonus tracks on it. 2001 was a difficult time for Heavy Metal as Nu metal was rearing it's ugly head, ironically Fear Factory's earlier albums helped to set the template for Nu Metal in a lot of ways. When I first heard this album I hated it because it seemed as though Fear Factory were selling out and being counter influenced by Nu Metal which in truth made me feel sickened. It wasn't until many years after its release that I finally bought the album as I was completing my Fear Factory collection. It took me a few listens to get into it, maybe I had mellowed out a little bit over the years between "Digimortals's" original release date and the date I bought it. It is not by any means my favourite Fear Factory album but I do enjoy it now and I consider it a stepping stone in the bands evolution. Some of the ambient undertones of the album remind me of the Hip-Hop side of Nu-Metal which is not my favourite thing in the world. Burton's vocals are more rap like and less abrasive than the earlier releases which doesn't really float my Metal boat. In my mind this album would be the equivalent of Metallica's "Load" and "Re-Load" albums but with a Nu Metal feel to it. I prefer Fear Factory's more Death Metal flavoured albums to this one and would only suggest it as a collection completer and not essential listening. "Digimortal" is for the hard core fans only, so listen to it before you buy it.
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I'm forsaking continuous prose in favour of some points about this album.

- When considering a method of describing the guitar playing of Dino Cazares, I kept coming back to the tired 'machine-gun riffing', and then realised that Dino's right hand is capable of producing a sonic attack far quicker than the average firing rate of a standard machine gun (something like 5 thousand rounds a minute).

- While this album is, as a result of it's production, less what we term 'heavy' than previous Fear Factory records, it boasts perhaps the band's most relentlessly challenging kick pedal patterns from tom-avoiding titan Ray Herrera. It is perhaps the best of example of why he should be missed from the band's current lineup.

- The saccharine clean strings of "Invisible Wounds (Dark Bodies)" and "(Memory Imprints) Never End" more than make up for their unnecessary parentheses abuse. In fact, the played-in-reverse outro on the former is prominent among the band's greatest achievements.

- The often maligned "Back The F*** Up" truly was head and shoulders above the rest of the myriad rap/ metal combos that began to litter the music scene of the early noughties - I was there. It's less an example of nu-metal (a term frequently used to describe Fear Factory by cripplingly inept journalists and misinformed music fans) and more of a pairing of chilling urban expression with the requisite hard-hitting aural assault of genuine musical pioneers.

- Burton C. Bell's new approach to vocal harmonies is so exciting that I often find myself singing the backing 'aaaa's in "Linchpin" instead of the main lyrics. Which are, as ever, excellent.

- While the aforementioned production is a little light - cymbals are often lost in the mix - Digimortal does highlight the auxiliary input of Rhys Fulber, whose semi-conscious robotic rambling on the joyfully upbeat "Damaged" really makes the song.

- As the album's closer, in typical Fear Factory fashion, fades off into the distance over the course of a few minutes, the serene enjoyment of what has just been experienced is only matched by the struggle not to skip straight back to the start of the album for another spin. My personal record for Digimortal is four successive plays.
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on 7 September 2002
Fear Factory were at the forefront of 90s metal alongside bands like Machine Head and Sepultura. Sadly all of these bands have taken poor routes forward.
Machine Head began to experiment with rap on Burning Red and seriously slumped on Supercharger.
Sepultura discovered nu-metal and went downhill from there.
Fear Factory did the worst of all: experimented with rap(Back The F**k Up on this album), extremely limited themselves with a concept on each album (man vs. machine) and this is the equivalent of Supercharger. Its weak and seemingly rushed, the signs of a band on their last legs.
Fear Factory were an awesome band 5 years ago and the live show was simply bludgeoning.
Its just a shame they wanted commercial success than staying a proper metal band. ie. the release of Digimortal. Simply a poor album with extremely average, bland songs. There are a couple of good ones; Linchpin is a pretty good track (however, it would have sounded poor on Demanufacture), and Dark Bodies is different and a break from the unrelenting noise of the previous tracks.
If you are new to Fera Factory, i would advise Demanufactre or Obsolete, 2 brilliant albums. If you just want to complete your Fear Factory album collection get this.
Purely a filler in the FF catalogue. How disappointing.
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on 27 June 2004
well let me see, since this album was released fear factory have split up reformed with a new bass player (christian shifting to guitar) and released the master piece archetype!!! why does all this matter?? digimortal is the end of an era, that's why. this is dino's masterpiece probably more to him than demanufacture was. i say this only after hearing several interviews with burton c bell about the comprimises he made with dino just to get this record finished. this is all irrelevant though. what is , is the fact that every song (bar back the f**k up) is an excellent song and for those that think fear factory have gone soft on this album think again. hurt conveyor is possibly the heaviest song fear factory have ever done(maybe slave labor, they're both at the ludicrous stage of metal chugginess) while expanding the direction in which they write songs (dark bodies, never end)yet at the same time keeping the classic ff vibe (damaged, acres of skin and byte block could have quite easily been part of demanufacture or obsolete).
this is not a bad album, if u don't have this album and u r afraid to buy it don't be, u won't regret it.
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on 6 December 2003
Being a life long Fear Factory fan and owning pretty much everything they’ve churned out, Digimortal is exactly as I expected it to be. Superb. People moaned when it was released, saying that they have gone soft etc. Well what do you expect? Demanufacture again and again? They have simply evolved, and it shows on so many levels on this album. Burton’s vocals have calmed, his bellowing growl turned down a notch, but his actual singing improved tenfold on this album, with songs such as Invisible Wounds (Dark Bodies) and Memory Imprints (Never End) showcasing this. And who would of thought that Fear Factory would be rapping with Cypress Hill on song Back the F*** Up? It’s better than most of the stuff actual rap-metal bands are churning out.
Having read all the reviews for this album, from supposed ‘True’ Fear Factory fans; I can see why they will never be truly popular sales-wise. Just because they haven’t made Demanufacture 2, they get slated by there own fans, just like Machine Head did with The Burning Red, and people go and buy Nu-Metal pap! Admittedly this is probably there weakest album they have done so far, but its still one of the top Metal Albums of the 21st Century. Take my advice and buy this album but if you can, get hold of the Digi-Pak edition with 4 extra tracks that really should have been included as normal tracks on the album. Roll on Archetype 2004!
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on 6 December 2003
Being a life long Fear Factory fan and owning pretty much everything they’ve churned out, Digimortal is exactly as I expected it to be. Superb. People moaned when it was released, saying that they have gone soft etc. Well what do you expect? Demanufacture again and again? They have simply evolved, and it shows on so many levels on this album. Burton’s vocals have calmed, his bellowing growl turned down a notch, but his actual singing improved tenfold on this album, with songs such as Invisible Wounds (Dark Bodies) and Memory Imprints (Never End) showcasing this. And who would of thought that Fear Factory would be rapping with Cypress Hill on song Back the F*** Up? It’s better than most of the stuff actual rap-metal bands are churning out.
Having read all the reviews for this album, from supposed ‘True’ Fear Factory fans; I can see why they will never be truly popular sales-wise. Just because they haven’t made Demanufacture 2, they get slated by there own fans, just like Machine Head did with The Burning Red, and people go and buy Nu-Metal pap! Admittedly this is probably there weakest album they have done so far, but its still one of the top Metal Albums of the 21st Century. Take my advice and buy this album but if you can, get hold of the Digi-Pak edition with 4 extra tracks that really should have been included as normal tracks on the album. Roll on Archetype 2004!
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on 24 April 2001
I don't think anyone expected this album to match Obselete, but I was pleasantly suprised and amused by back the **** up, as it has a distinctly limp bizkit sound to it. Button's vocals are as strong as ever and the guitar riffery is second to none. My favourite track being their new single, Linchpin. Fear factory get stronger as they go on, with slight but noticeable changes in style. Well worth a purchase, but people new to fear factory may not see it in the same light as those who know the band.
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on 3 May 2006
when i first heard digimortal i wasnt blown away and that was a new sensation for me as far as fear factory releases go,there appeared at first to be something lacking and it wasnt just the ferocity that was so obvious on their previous releases,it wasnt just that,i have always hated the rap song back the fxxk up and that hasnt changed but my opinion of the album has changed tenfold and now i rate it as a fine release that would have been a masterpiece if the song back the fxxk up wasnt included,at the time i wondered if the band were going to turn into a nu metal/rap band,then they split up and returned with two more solid albums but digimortal is an album that will keep fear factory fans purring.

it starts with what will become which is a strong opener,granted the album is more melodic than fierce but that aint a problem,it still rocks when it wants too such as in the angry acres of skin,linchpin is a class song that is extremely strong and catchy,and that was always a fear factory trait anyway.

its an album that over the years that i have returned too and loved all the more,time has been very kind to this album and it can seldom be faulted bar the rap song which is hopeless.
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on 5 July 2001
This album is a real,real good metal record, however i can't help but feel that they may be coming to the ed of what is an awsome career for the L.A cyber-metalers.To be honest i'm not too surprised that this isn't theur best offering-they have already given us two of the best metal albums money can buy in Demanufacture and Obselete.Demaufacture is quite simply the best metal album monet can buy,whilst Obselete is the best sounding Nu-metally release by Roadrunner. Digimortal has plenty of heaviness, just not the tunes that would define this as a brilliant album.Lynchpin is very,very good and stands out among a host of average Fear Factory tracks.I personally blame Roadruner records as they've also butchered the sound of Soulfly and Machine Head in the recent years of sh***y Nu-metal.A good album but spend your money on the Fear Factory back catalogue for the complete metal experience.
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on 25 April 2001
Fear Factory's fourth studio LP sees them deliver an album several notches above their previous release, Obsolete. They still live in that world of man vs machine but the key difference is that where most of Obsolete lived in walls of sound and hate, Digimortal sees Bell, Cazares and co inject such much needed groove and melody throughout the album. Tracks like 'No One' and 'Acres of Skin' still rage on, but soon-to-be-live-favorites 'Linchpin', What Will Become' and 'Invisible Wounds (Dark Bodies)' see FF on top form. The extra tracks on this digipack version aren't the usual miscellaneous demos and live versions either. Check out 'Strain vs Resistance' for a track that should really be on the regular version of the album.
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