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4.5 out of 5 stars
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4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 20 May 2009
I have to say I was suspicious of this album originally, as usually I think that no good can come of rehashing former glories but I was surprised. The re-recording has given new life to great songs. The original was great but the recording slightly creaky when played loud but this is great fun, same songs but with the added urgency of a band reliving their youth! Play loud!
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on 9 May 2003
Walking through woolies in the mid-eighties, i heard 'a wish away' by the wonderstuff playing on the shop gramophone. Crikey, i thought, that's a fine tune. 84 years later i'm still playing this and all the other wonderstuff albums.
Those who know and love them will know that they're an infectious, addictive band caught very easily by word of mouth. I passed the infection on to many of my friends and they all maintain the same affection for this band that i do.
This first album is marginally my favourite over the others but they're all cracking.
If you've stumbled upon this page by accident then first, get help using your computer next time and secondly shell out for this CD and prepare to be educated.
Better still, buy a ticket to see them play their fiddles and bows this winter in a town near you. They're best eaten live.
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on 29 December 2015
I bought this album for Radio Ass Kiss - but me being me, bought the wrong album. Anyway, it's a very good record. There are a few rock and roll cliches but there are also some great bits of musicality which make The Eight Legged Groove Machine worth paying for.
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on 10 June 2009
Amazing re-working of a classic album. Saw them live recently and this album really demonstrates what they are live now. Raw and loud. A real must for any fan!
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on 21 December 2008
Went to their 20 year anniversary of TELGM recently and despite the fact they have lost two of their original members (RIP Bass Thing and Gilksy)they remain as fresh,snarling, vibrant and yet sarcastic as they ever were. Miles you are a genius and whilst this was an album of its times, what times they were. As catchy an album as you will ever find full of true lyrical genius. If they were starting out today they would still make it !!
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on 29 September 2013
I think some of the below reviews may have confused this with the anniversary re-recording. This is the original. Both are well worth a listen and I would heartily recommend them both.

The old favourites are all here, A Wish Away, Unbearable, Ruby Horse. As are some over-looked tunes from the repertoire, Rue the Day and Some Sad Someone. Of the bonus tracks here, I love Song Without An End.

Enjoy!
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on 8 February 2001
I'm a bit loathe to say it, but, yes, this does sound a little dated now. Still, the album which kicked off my dalliance with the Stuffies is more than loveable. That may be me being a tad sentimental, yet, even for someone who's never heard of these talented eight legs, this album must truly be addictive. And now it's original three-minute pop-rock catchiness has been supplemented with the addition of four bonus B-side tracks - as all Stuffie fans know, the B-sides often proved some of the band's finest moments, but, admittedly, these aren't them (why is 10 Trenches Deep not here?). How The Wonderstuff managed to pale into the dreaded obscurity of the bargain bucket I'll never know, because as tracks as wonderful and audacious as Unbearable, It's Yer Money I'm After and Red Berry Joy Town (and of course the many further and more cultured classics the band were to release ) prove, this Brummie band were, simply, top notch.
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The current incarnation of The Wonder Stuff, who have been ripping up stages across the UK for the past few years, tackle the classic debut album. It's the same old story, but a new telling, with subtle additions and new interpretations, new arrangements, different inflections, new fiddle parts. A new version, and a worthy addition. Not only that, but you get the whole of the original album in order with several additional b-sides reworked. It's a hefty hour of great music.

With no song under 20 years old, it's a time capsule but there's no sense of tiredness, no ennui of being in-it-for-the-money : just a bunch of great songs - songs that would sound as good if they were released now as they did then - held together with spark, wit, and passion. Songs like this saved my life ; they still mean as much to me now as they did then. It's a Wonderful Life
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on 11 November 2014
really quck service , great deal
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on 20 May 2009
In 1988 the music world was just about to start embracing the compact disc. With it's extended dynamic range it offered unsurpassed sound clarity giving music a whole new breath of life. The original ELGM sounded great on CD - the format brought out the full quirkiness of the band's sound.
Fast forward 21 years and the music industry is blighted by this sickening trend known as 'The Loudness War' where music is equalised in such a manner as to make it sound as loud as is possible. In doing this, the music is stripped of its peaks and lows - in other words, it's dynamics are removed. So what you hear is a mass onslaught of noise that hits maximum level and stays there. Loud parts are loud, quiet parts are equally as loud. This makes extended listening not only unrewarding but downright tiring because your brain cannot process the barrage of noise.
Why all this descriptive blah blah in a review, you may ask. Well, upon playing this new version of the ELGM my ears have been ripped off my head within 2 songs. There is no quirkiness here. The sound is just pure hell. In modernising this recording the band or the engineers who recorded, mixed and mastered this recording have decided to pander to the current trend of smashing the life out of the sound and the end result is a grating, piercing mush of noise. The music is ruined - it's impossible to hear any intricacies of the sound - they're squashed together and boosted to ludicrous extremes.
So I cannot review this music because to me it sounds flat and lifeless. How sad that the original version, which was made when technology was much less advanced, should sound far superior to the new version.
The music industry and artists need to wake up to the fact that they, along with the people who are unable to listen to music on anything but tiny little earbuds, are destroying sound (and therefore, the music recorded). But they won't.

A totally missed opportunity for such a good idea.
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