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4.5 out of 5 stars
42
4.5 out of 5 stars


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on 18 April 2017
How do you do a best of ? Impossible ,I bought this for the unreleased stuff and then alone is excellent .
For Ride to be left off Secrets of the beehive speaks volumes of the albums quality .Great compilation to out on a chill ,if you're dabbling in Sylvian buy the above mentioned album and Gone to earth and go from there
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on 17 November 2001
Japan, David Sylvian's band from the 80's, had something individual which attracted my interest many moons ago. In July 2001 I read a very favourable review of Everything and Nothing and it mentioned that David Sylvian, a blast from the past, planned to play in Dublin in October. I bought the CD and it has been a revealation, giving me many hours of pleasure over the last few months. I saw David Sylvian and his band in Dublin and since then I have appreciated the music even more. Magnolia which opens the first disc is a superb track moving along against the back drop of a great drum beat. David Sylvian's voice does it for me - it has soul, passion and sets the mood of the piece. Some of the other tracks are very complex but as I got to know the songs they became my favourites - like all great music. The second song on CD2 has a dark grinding distorted guitar riff which weaves the piece into a complex, moody and torturous web reflective of the mind. I was once told that complex music needs an educated ear and that's the pity. The world prefer's the sing along chorus of Kylie and Robbie and the genius of David Sylvian is not heard. Maybe classical music like Wagner is at the top of the music tree but to me David Sylvian and his ilk - I would include Jeff Buckley in this small group, are the classical musicians of the 21st century. Give it a shot - I hope you like it. The CD includes 3 CD's and I have yet to listen to number 3. I am saving it for a rainy night in.
Mark H
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on 28 July 2002
Barely a year after Dead Bees on a Cake Sylvian returns with, not so much a greatest hits album, but more of a 3-course nicely presented meal encompassing previous favourites, rarities, unreleased material and the odd Japan composition, most of which has been re-recorded (vocally) remixed, and all remastered on this double CD package. Collaborative works are also featured, duets with Sakamoto, Jon Hassell, Robert Fripp to name several. The end result is something that holds together rather well, and certainly rewards repeated listening. Early, right through to recent, with nice liner notes explaining the source and alterations of each piece. There are wonderful songs on here such as Let The Happiness In, Ghosts, Orpheus and Laughter and Forgetting, even hard to get hold of stuff such as the one-off single 'Pop Song', an excellent track, and never one to trouble the compilers of the Top 40, such is Sylvian's non-commercial approach to tune making, but songs that, never-the-less, will wind their way into your conciousness. Though curiously, there is only one track from his Brilliant Trees album. That small gripe aside, there are no fillers here and it'll hold your interest from start to finish, a worthy addition to your collection.
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on 15 October 2000
Here's the short version, because I usually get too wordy when I try to describe a record by an artist I like...
Everything and Nothing draws more or less evenly from Sylvian's solo albums (not counting 1985's instrumental album, Alchemy), collaborations, and non-album singles, then adds a handful of previously unreleased songs on top.
As usual the packaging is very well done (though it is a bit fragile), with distinctive artwork; and the sound quality is mostly excellent - all three CDs in the limited edition are gold discs.
Highlights among the previously unreleased material are: "The Scent of Magnolia", which is better than most of the songs on Dead Bees on a Cake; "Ride", the lost centerpiece from Secrets of the Beehive; "Cover Me With Flowers", another Dead Bees outtake; and the almost legendary lost Japan track "Some Kind Of Fool". Also refreshing are the remixes of "The Golden Way" and "Come Morning"; both are far superior to the original Marco Polo versions.
The collection stumbles badly in two places, however. "Ghosts" suffers from the loss of its intro, which sets the mood of the piece, and the new vocal lacks the mood-enhancing tension of the original. Rather than just re-doing the vocal, perhaps Sylvian should have re-recorded it from top to bottom. The other mis-step is "Bamboo Houses", which contains a few embellishments that come off sounding totally gratuitous.
Overall, a wonderful piece of work. I suspect that Everything and Nothing isn't likely to attract many new listeners, but it will definitely keep the rest of us listening...
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 14 October 2016
I have an immense soft spot for this album - from the dog on the cover (complete with eyebrows) to the beautifully balanced collection held within the gatefold.

This album represents the pinnacle of 20 years work for Sylvian. The collection is actually rather soothing and cathartic. It has been so thoughtfully compiled and includes some real gems, including 'Ghosts', the delightful 'Scent of Magnolias', the sweet 'I Surrender' and the beautiful 'Buoy'.

Whether you're a fan of David Sylvian or Japan, or are looking for a way into his music - this is a great place to start.
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This double CD comprises 140 minutes of innovative music both blissful and aggrieved, both emotionally cold and daringly romantic. It is supposed to comprise a kind of `best of' of Sylvian's vocal works up to 2000, but one can argue into the night about whether this is such a playlist. (There is an equivalent disc of his instrumental works called `Camphor').

Indeed, many of the tracks have previously been unreleased, some of them amazingly so, such as the marvellous opening `Scent of Magnolia' and the fantastically beautiful `Ride'. This latter track is worthy of five stars (as is `Orpheus' on the second disc). Five of the twenty-nine tracks derive from the `Dead Bees on a Cake' sessions, and one track is a seven-minute previously unreleased Japan track.

Many of the tracks also come from albums credited to other acts, such as Ryuichi Sakamoto, Alesini/Andreoni, Mick Karn, and - of course - Japan/Rain Tree Crow. And there are a number of tracks featuring Sylvian's work with Robert Fripp.

There's lots of remixing done for this album, virtually every track according to the sleevenotes. Many of the songs are jazz-inflected and a surprising number are based on the blues. Overall, it's a mixed bag. Some songs don't work for me, but they are very few and far between. Ultimately I am left with a highly positive view of Sylvian as a man who has ploughed his own furrow, albeit with a lot of collaboration along the way. But he knows what he wants and - luckily for us - we want what he knows.
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on 19 September 2001
I have listened to David Sylvian's music since the 80's. I haven't been to a concert (thwarted by my french GCSE in May 1988), but I just love listening. This album encompasses everything I love about his style. Yes, it covers many years, and the omission of some of my favourites, (Forbidden Colours being THE best record ever), can be forgiven because who wants to hear the same old stuff all the time? It is beautiful. I listen in the bath, I listen at bed time, when I'm reading, when I'm writing, drawing. It is relaxing if you want, invigorating if you want. The listener makes it into what they want.
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on 26 March 2013
Would have put more of his most melancoly songs on it, but this collection is almost perfect. Sadness and it's emotions are his forte. No one does it better.
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on 13 October 2000
Beautifully packaged with a generous list of retrospective classics. Some reworked tracks, but also offering a new light of undiscovered previous material which gives us back a lost regenerated gap in Sylvian's work. Which I think we all feel starved by. So even for the non Sylvian fan there is something in this monumental compilation for all.
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on 13 October 2000
Beautifully packaged with a generous list of retrospective classics. Some reworked tracks, but also offering a new light of undiscovered previous material which gives us back a lost regenerated gap in Sylvian's work. Which I think we all feel starved by. So even for the non Sylvian fan there is something in this monumental compilation for all.
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