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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 14 January 2015
“no doubt pleasant are the teares which Musicke weepes, neither are teares shed always in sorrowe, but sometime in joy and gladnesse” (John Dowland).

Anthony Holborne was probably born around 1545, and died in 1602. Not a lot is known about his life, but he was closely involved at the highest level in the flowering of Elizabethan music. His life coincided largely with the life and reign of Elizabeth I, and as such was part of the renaissance movement which included Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Nicholas Hillaried, William Byrd, and John Dowland. Dowland even referenced Holborne in his ‘Second Booke of Songs or Aires’, dedicating ‘I saw my ladye weepe’ to “the most famous, Anthony Holborne”. Holborne’s music was greatly respected in his day, and deserves to be better remembered today. Thankfully, this cd goes a way towards reviving his music for a modern audience.

The music in this recording is from the collection ‘Pavans, Galliards and Almaines’ which Holborne wrote and published in London in 1599. This was the first printed collection of dance music to appear in England, and the music was published in part books for the separate instruments, recommended as suitable for viols, violins or other musical wind insruments. Performance notes are also given in the publication. This is quite remarkable for the times, and much appreciation must go to Holborne for going to this trouble, and being able to get this published.

The music, being written for dance styles, moves between fast and slow dances; from pavan to galliard to almaine. Hesperion XXI under Jordi Savall has approached the music in the true spirit in which it was written, and performs it admirably, as always. The balance of the instruments is perfect, with nothing being overshadowed or blurred in the important harmonies of the instruments and tones. This is a great cd, a timeless collection of wonderful sixteenth century music of an important but often (now) overlooked composer. Definitely recommended for any lover of English Tudor, or sixteenth century music.
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 14 January 2015
“no doubt pleasant are the teares which Musicke weepes, neither are teares shed always in sorrowe, but sometime in joy and gladnesse” (John Dowland).

Anthony Holborne was probably born around 1545, and died in 1602. Not a lot is known about his life, but he was closely involved at the highest level in the flowering of Elizabethan music. His life coincided largely with the life and reign of Elizabeth I, and as such was part of the renaissance movement which included Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Nicholas Hillaried, William Byrd, and John Dowland. Dowland even referenced Holborne in his ‘Second Booke of Songs or Aires’, dedicating ‘I saw my ladye weepe’ to “the most famous, Anthony Holborne”. Holborne’s music was greatly respected in his day, and deserves to be better remembered today. Thankfully, this cd goes a way towards reviving his music for a modern audience.

The music in this recording is from the collection ‘Pavans, Galliards and Almaines’ which Holborne wrote and published in London in 1599. This was the first printed collection of dance music to appear in England, and the music was published in part books for the separate instruments, recommended as suitable for viols, violins or other musical wind insruments. Performance notes are also given in the publication. This is quite remarkable for the times, and much appreciation must go to Holborne for going to this trouble, and being able to get this published.

The music, being written for dance styles, moves between fast and slow dances; from pavan to galliard to almaine. Hesperion XXI under Jordi Savall has approached the music in the true spirit in which it was written, and performs it admirably, as always. The balance of the instruments is perfect, with nothing being overshadowed or blurred in the important harmonies of the instruments and tones. This is a great cd, a timeless collection of wonderful sixteenth century music of an important but often (now) overlooked composer. Definitely recommended for any lover of English Tudor, or sixteenth century music.
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on 10 July 2013
Hesperion XXI reveal the exceptional beauty of Holborne's consort music in this comprehensive collection.
This is a "must have" for anyone who values the creative genius of Anthony Holborne. The playing captures the ebb and flow of both metre and mood and Saval's selection has been carefully chosen to give the listener a full and varied programme of Holborne's output.
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on 25 February 2013
This is beautiful music and it is beautifully played and recorded. Jordi Savall never seems to disappoint. The Holborne repertoire is a must for those who love the late16th century english music. Most of the standard repertoire is recorded here.
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on 14 October 2014
a very stylish pair of levers
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