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on 3 September 2016
Weird but brilliant head trip to the united fruitcake outlet
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on 31 July 2016
Excellent cult movie of the USA 70's. Authentic and fun!
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on 28 November 2016
This is my favourite movie of all time. So of course I had to buy it eventually!
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on 2 September 2017
say no more
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on 25 September 2017
Thank you.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 19 April 2015
Repo Man has become one of those films where even though it was savaged by many critics of the time (not Ebert, he loved it), was met with very poor box office as well, but now everyone seems to shout that they loved it back then, always have! It is the very definition of a "cult movie", a pic that went underground and found its audience, so much so it burst back above ground and today is still being discovered by an ever intrigued movie loving audience.

Repo Man was one of a kind, a film that refused to be pigeon holed, a true original. Story for what it's worth has Emilio Estevez as L.A. punk Otto Maddox who gets bluffed into a repo man job. Taken under the wing of Bud (Harry Dean Stanton), Otto gets to become a fully fledged repo man, taking on all the perks and dangers that come with the territory. But when a mysterious 1964 Chevy Malibu arrives on the patch, all bets seem to be off because everyone is either after it or being disintegrated by it!

The life of a repo man is always intense.

OK! Where to start? Offbeat, eccentric, punk, funky, funny, smart? Repo Man is all those things, it dares to be bold and challenging, its satirical edges slicing away at film genres and American societies. Director Alex Cox (how wonderful that such an American film is directed by a British guy) fills out this scuzzy part of L.A. with hippies, freaks, punks, aliens, scientist nutters, UFO nutters, effeminate coppers and the repo men themselves, a bunch of grizzled souls hardened by life's travails, but always with a quip, a smile and a gunshot at the ready.

The dialogue fizzes with cheeky derring-do, some lines even today still quotable and used in pubs and clubs across the continents. Robby Muller's cinematography has snap crackle and pop, as does the rocking soundtrack as Cox invites the likes of Iggy Pop, The Circle Jerks, Black Flag and The Plugz into his weird and wonderful world. Performances are bang on the dollar, Stanton the class act, Estevez superb, Tracey Walter proving what his fans already knew, that he's a legendary character actor.

From an opening involving a pair of smoking boots, to the glowing sci-fi nirvana finale, Repo Man kicks ass. One viewing is never enough, and for sure there are those who have seen it once and hate it to the point of refusing to ever watch it again. That's a shame, because repeat viewings are essential, because the more you watch the more Cox's deliriously cheeky movie makes sense. 9/10
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on 7 August 2016
Superb
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on 6 December 2016
Great cult film in perfect condition
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on 27 April 2017
All is well. Great blu-ray.
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on 3 December 2013
Otto is working at the grocery when he loses his temper and quits. Befriended by a Repo Man, Otto sees vehicle repossession as a kind of modern buccaneering.

He is attracted by the adventure and the 'who gives a damn' attitude of the other Repo men.

At the same time a package is taken from a government lab that has strange effects on anyone who sees it.

It is hidden in a car which the government lists for repossession with a hefty reward.

The first thing you realise, is how wonderfully bonkers the whole film is. And if you don't like the opening scene with the iconic smoking boots, turn it off, because you'll hate the rest of the film.

Cox has never bettered this movie, and the movie is all about anarchy, heavily influenced by the punk scene in the UK during the late seventies and early eighties.

The first two acts are brilliant. Estevez exudes cool as Otto, and again, he's never been better in anything else. The support are just as bonkers, and it goes along nicely Leftfield, with subliminal images harking back to earlier narrative, and the whole generic food thing going on is all very sanitised.

And then the final act comes, and it loses its momentum ever so slightly, because it just gets too bizarre, and because of this it falters.

But all in all, its a wonderful study of suburbanites, waiting for something special to happen
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