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on 29 October 2003
Why moan about plot, poor scripts, etc. Silver Nemesis is pure comic book adventure. The Doctor and Ace are a great double act, neither of them worried about getting dirty or wet when diving for cover during the battle scenes. OK, the battle scenes in Silver Nemesis may not be on the scale of a Hollywood blockbuster, but remember, it was only a three episode BBC TV programme with a limited budget. Besides, who wants to see blood and guts all over the screen, AND it was also pre-watershed family viewing.
The Cybermen may not have been as menacing as in Earthshock, but if you recall, one of the Cybermen was killed by using Adric's gold star, so why shouldn't Ace be able to kill them with gold coins and a catapult!
I grew up watching Dr Who, I still remember watching the very first episode as a boy, and Silver Nemesis is good old-fashioned Dr Who fair at its best.
Did one reviewer get mixed up? The episode where the Doctor and Ace pay £5 for drinks was Battlefield.
When you watch Silver Nemesis listen out during the scene in the crypt where the German soldier knocks a Cyberman to the ground. I'm sure I heard the Cyberman say 'OW' as he hit the floor!
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on 5 May 2009
It's a shame that Amazon's image for this is so poor - the box cover is green and silver and looks really cool.
I totally agree with BlindBadger on this one; it's an anniversary story and therefore should have as much packed in as possible - plot's not overly important in Doctor Who folks so it's no good us fans getting our knickers in a twist about it! What's important is colourful scintillating entertainment - and this VHS provides that in bucketfuls. With guest stars of the calibre of the (apparently very difficult to work with) Anton Diffring, as a Nazi war criminal, and Gerard Murphy as a man literally out of time, this is a top-notch adventure. Ok, I know the series was supposed to be fun AND educational, but surely we can forgive the production team here; at least it's fun!

Great making-of too; but Gary Downie really ought to have been censored for that terrible shirt!
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on 5 May 2009
I dunno, I just don't get all this criticism. It's Doctor Who people, it's fun and exciting and has the best Doctor and companion pairing since, in my opinion, William Hartnell and Ian/Barbara.

All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed this tale and since purchasing this video I know that it'll be a serial I'll watch more than just a couple of times. This video also made me realise why I'm not so much of a fan of these later Doctors because I think the charm that was Doctor Who seems to be seriously lacking. Oh they might have a joke here and there and all that, but it seems to me as if the PTBs (Russell T Davies at least) have decided to make it all rather serious and turn the Doctor into, primarily, an obvious, blatant, melancholic, hypocritical, wet blanket.

Bring back these fun filled, exciting adventures where you can just sit back and let your imagination run away with you, and not be steeped knee-deep in special effects that simply kills your imagination in an instant. Bring back this kind of Doctor where the melancholy and loneliness is subtle and not shoved in your face.

Anyway, sorry about the semi-rant, I do though highly recommend this video to anyone, especially for the "Making of" - It was very interesting to see the inner workings and what not, and you also get to see the fun everyone has while making it - and I think the frustrations as well.

High recommendation from me

:-)
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on 23 November 2015
To all the people that are jumping to lampoon this story lets look at the facts. Silver nemesis was the last in the series to be produced, even greatest show was actually filmed before hand! They could not film in studio as the bbc had an aspestos scare (ogo poor quality footage even in the dvd remaster). The writer for this story was chosen because nobody else wanted to write the 25th story and time was running short. The writer knew nothing of doctor who's past but managed to make it 'entirely accurate'. On top of all this time for filming the story and writing the script was painfully short! The team went into overtime trying to get it perfect which gave even less time for the story once the script had been written. The final scene between pienforte, doctor and cyberleader had NO REHERSAL atall. If anything this story did the impossible in the time avalible, more extended and deleted scenes than many other storys around this time by far! Yeah it was condensed alot to three parts, yeah the cybermen plasma gun effect was never added as origionally planned but what stands is more than enough to say it was a success, yeah it wasnt a success like the caves of androzani but then the caves of androzani didnt have half the problems silver nemesis had. Mccoy said himself they could do it so much better if they had the time. On a possitive note if you want this story in your collection to complete it you need both this vhs release and the dvd because on this rare occasion the vhs has stuff the dvd doesnt and vice versa. Well worth the money, just such a shame the vhs extended version never made for a special edition featuring all the deleted and extended scenes (some of which are not even on the vhs and dvd release)
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on 31 July 2002
worth the purchase price to any doctor who fan purely for the 'making of...' documentary, which takes the viewer through the entire production process for the serial. also contains quotations from actors and production staff from earlier 'who' serials. this segment should have an 18 certificate for the 1980s fashion crimes of some of the bbc personnel.
as for the serial itself? w-e-e-e-ll. there are some interesting concepts mixed in. far too many actually, what with nazis, elizabethan/stuart sorceresses, cybernetic aliens and their zombie henchmen, time travel, royal household high-jinx, lethal statues of living metal and contemporary jazz heroes: the plot's a mess. a total, hopeless, tattered mess. but mccoy and aldred (and their characters) are likeable and (as another reviewer remarks) the performances of walker and murphy are good (if a bit camp/over the top). there are a number of quite good humourous moments - usually played between the doctor and ace, or lady peinfort and richard. there's also a moment of great effect as the statue comes to life in lady p's mausoleum.
but don't hold it up to the light and don't expect coherence: i doubt if pre-newtonian astronomers would know what a comet was, let alone be able to predict when one might expect its return; all manner of incongruous weirdos wander around in spaceships or with guns with impunity; police are murdered with no consequences at all. yep, it's drivel. but it's fun.
and, amazon, it has nothing to do with william hartnell.
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on 23 November 2006
Aww, bless.

The Cybermen were trotted out one final time in the "original" series, to mark the 25th (that's Silver, folks) anniversary of the show.

Sadly, the story showed a distinct decline in quality since they had previously been shown in Colin Baker's Attack of the Cybermen. Now appearing to sport some sort of weird baseball-mitt hands, they made an impressive entrance, and then fell over and died rather a lot. How disheartening to find the Cybermen, supposedly the "stuff of nightmares" felled by a catapult and a coin to the chest!

Apart from this, the story appears to sacrifice any coherence of plot to the frantic pace of combining three enemies - Cybermen, Nazis and a mad 16th century aristocrat - with overgenerous heaps of self-referential business about the Doctor's identity and mysterious nature. In the end, you really don't care who wins, you just want it to be over with. A grim send-off for the original series' Cybermen.
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on 29 November 2000
For starters WHY do people insist on writing reviews when they don't even understand the history of what goes on?? One of your other reviewers moans about how pathetic it is that the Cybermen are killed 'by coins'....what he fails to note is that they're GOLD COINS....anyone who knows anything about Cybermen knows that gold is the one thing that kills them almost instantly...So OF COURSE the coins kill them...Having said that the story and the sets do show how much the budget limitations have affected the stories...It's a shame really that this is so...... But that aside I still feel that this is one of the best, of the last stories...There have been better ones (some a lot better) but I am still very pleased to have this in my collection of Dr Who stories..
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on 16 September 2005
The Silver Nemesis combines the struggle for total power between a 16th century Lady, a group of post-war Naxis and a large fleet of cybermen. The effect is a runaround story with the Nemesis constantly swapping hands until the Doctor finally manges to take take it back. The cybermen getting destroyed in batches shows their weakness but is there for "showing off" special effects. Adding elements of history, ambition, and the possible destruction of earth, this story, for the "25th Anniversary", marks the (possible?) end of the Cybermen. The moral is that total power brings death to all that seek it. One to deffinitly watch if your Doctor Who fans
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on 5 November 2010
I first saw Silver Nemesis at the age of seven. The story didn't make much sense then, but at that age, all my playground cronies and I wanted from Doctor Who was action, stunts and explosions, which luckily Silver Nemesis did provide.
I bought the VHS tape about Eleven years ago for nostalgia, and after casting a critical media student eye over it, I have to agree with the umpteen reviews I have read about this episode. It certainly is the weakest of the 25th anniversary season, and one of the overall weakest of Sylvester McCoy's run as the Doctor. The story is garbled and incoherent, there are plotholes and inconsistencies aplenty, and the endscene is a virtual rip off of that of Remembrance of the Daleks, the far superior season 25 opener.
The overall production of Silver Nemesis was lacklusture. By this time Doctor Who's popularity was at virtual rock bottom and, other than us die hard fans, was simply not engaging the younger audience. It suffered from a low production budget and very poor writing. By his own admission, producer John Nathan Turner had at this point had enough of DW (you can see his blatantly defeated outlook on the Special Edition interviews).
JNT did stick it out for the final season the following year, but despite the sudden upturn through the brilliant writing and conceptual design involved in the episodes Ghost Light and The Curse of Fenric, Doctor Who had had its day (for a while anyway!).
On the positive side, we do get a glimpse into Gallifreyan lore, coupled with more thematic references to the mysterious side of this very dark Doctor. Is the Doctor far older than we know? What is his relationship with Omega, Rassilon and the 'dark times'? What are his secrets? These themes were referenced beautifully in the novelisations of the final two series, as well as the Virgin 'New Adventures' book series.
In several scenes we follow the Doctor duelling with an unseen chess opponent in his visits to Lady Peinforte's 17th century home. This opponent is revealed in the following season to be Fenric,the malevolent intelligence whom the Doctor trapped in the shadow dimensions after stumping him with a chess puzzle, which is eventually resolved in the climax of the Curse of Fenric. Although this could be described as the progenitor of the modern series' use of episodic continuity buildup and climax, it is very crudely executed; after a gap of twelve months, could any young fan remember the Doctor playing a game of chess in a study? Sylvester McCoy and Sophie Aldred do their best given the poor direction and script, something which even the inclusion of veteran actor Anton Diffring as the Nazi leader De Flores could not help to alleviate.
Enjoy this one as part of the 25 year celebration series (the cybermen and the Validium statue fronting this silver anniversary as something of a gimmick), but be prepared for a bit of a cringe-worthy performance overall.
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on 5 November 2010
I first saw Silver Nemesis at the age of seven. The story didn't make much sense then, but at that age, all my playground cronies and I wanted from Doctor Who was action, stunts and explosions, which luckily Silver Nemesis did provide.
I bought the VHS tape about Eleven years ago for nostalgia, and after casting a critical media student eye over it, I have to agree with the umpteen reviews I have read about this episode. It certainly is the weakest of the 25th anniversary season, and one of the overall weakest of Sylvester McCoy's run as the Doctor. The story is garbled and incoherent, there are plotholes and inconsistencies aplenty, and the endscene is a virtual rip off of that of Remembrance of the Daleks, the far superior season 25 opener.
The overall production of Silver Nemesis was lacklusture. By this time Doctor Who's popularity was at virtual rock bottom and, other than us die hard fans, was simply not engaging the younger audience. It suffered from a low production budget and very poor writing. By his own admission, producer John Nathan Turner had at this point had enough of DW (you can see his blatantly defeated outlook on the Special Edition interviews).
JNT did stick it out for the final season the following year, but despite the sudden upturn through the brilliant writing and conceptual design involved in the episodes Ghost Light and The Curse of Fenric, Doctor Who had had its day (for a while anyway!).
On the positive side, we do get a glimpse into Gallifreyan lore, coupled with more thematic references to the mysterious side of this very dark Doctor. Is the Doctor far older than we know? What is his relationship with Omega, Rassilon and the 'dark times'? What are his secrets? These themes were referenced beautifully in the novelisations of the final two series, as well as the Virgin 'New Adventures' book series.
In several scenes we follow the Doctor duelling with an unseen chess opponent in his visits to Lady Peinforte's 17th century home. This opponent is revealed in the following season to be Fenric,the malevolent intelligence whom the Doctor trapped in the shadow dimensions after stumping him with a chess puzzle, which is eventually resolved in the climax of the Curse of Fenric. Although this could be described as the progenitor of the modern series' use of episodic continuity buildup and climax, it is very crudely executed; after a gap of twelve months, could any young fan remember the Doctor playing a game of chess in a study? Sylvester McCoy and Sophie Aldred do their best given the poor direction and script, something which even the inclusion of veteran actor Anton Diffring as the Nazi leader De Flores could not help to alleviate.
Enjoy this one as part of the 25 year celebration series (the cybermen and the Validium statue fronting this silver anniversary as something of a gimmick), but be prepared for a bit of a cringe-worthy performance overall.
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