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Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5

on 20 April 2018
Great stuff, thanks very much
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on 27 December 2011
You have to get this album. And listen to it loud over and over until you understand. As fresh today as when they were playing it back in the day. If the revolution had taken off then this would be the World Anthem.
3 people found this helpful
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on 18 April 2016
MC5 x 5 Stars

by

Rob Jones

The arrival of the MC5 in the mid 60's left an indelible mark on the future of rock 'n' roll. The mix of their revolutionary politics & maelstrom music
helped form a template for punk potency, that was to follow several years later. The fire of the Motor City 5 was built upon the hedonism of a decadent decade while challenging the ruling regime via their White Panther allegiances. Their 'avant rock' was set against a background of social upheaval in the USA-highlighted by the opposition to the brutal war in Vietnam, racial tension, narcotic regulations and uprisings e.g. The 1967 Detroit Rebellion (that led to fatalities, destruction and arrests on a large scale). Meanwhile, the MC5 created an awesome, aural arsenal-and, their 1968debut LP, Kick out the Jams remains as an incendiary offering!
To sample the manic magnitude of the band (covered by The Damned and Primal Scream et al) try the CD-The Big Bang! Best of The MC5 (Rhino Records) and if you can get hold of the DVD-Creem presents: MC5 Kick out the Jams.
The CD peaks with the robust of Ramblin' Rose, Kick out the Jams, Come Together, Rocket Reducer No.62 (Rama Lama Fa Fa Fa) culled from their 1st album. As regards the DVD, Leni Sinclair and Cary Loren have done a fine job to gel archive footage of MC5 at maximum momentum and juxtapose this fire against a kaleidoscope of an era torn between hippie love-peace and totalitarian hate-war!
Norman Mailer calls MC5 the 'electro-mechanical climax of the age'-as the band cry 'Are you the problem or the solution?' to their fans. 'The interest in MC5 is still immense with their logo shirts rivalling The Ramones couture as a fashion must. Three of the original MC5 have now sadly died (leaving only Wayne Kramer and Dennis Thompson) , but their legacy is alive-via a mass of premier product. Feast upon the MC5 electric experience! Go and ride the Thunder Express!
One person found this helpful
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on 12 March 2000
A compilation of some of the sharpest work - and also some of the most irritating - by Detroit's second noisiest, second most incendiary rocking teen combo. The MC5 were loud, sloppy, pretentious and full of half-baked revolutionary nonsense, but they could kick ass, as witnessed by the finest tracks on this album: the legendary uncensored version of "Kick Out the Jams", an extremely murky but fun version of "I Can Only Give You Everything" (Phil Coulter's finest hour), their late masterpiece "Over and Over", a sort of "Won't Get Fooled Again" without the druggy grandiosity. There's also some dull bar band rock which doesn't do them any favours (Wayne Kramer engagingly explains in the sleevenotes that they listened to playbacks of their second album at full volume and hence failed to realise how thin it sounded.) They were wild, they were full of it, and they were more than a bit ridiculous, but they rocked a good deal harder than Quicksilver Messenger Service. Kick out the jams, melonfarmers, indeed.
15 people found this helpful
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on 12 March 2000
A compilation of some of the sharpest work - and also some of the most irritating - by Detroit's second noisiest, second most incendiary rocking teen combo. The MC5 were loud, sloppy, pretentious and full of half-baked revolutionary nonsense, but they could kick ass, as witnessed by the finest tracks on this album: the legendary uncensored version of "Kick Out the Jams", an extremely murky but fun version of "I Can Only Give You Everything" (Phil Coulter's finest hour), their late masterpiece "Over and Over", a sort of "Won't Get Fooled Again" without the druggy grandiosity. There's also some dull bar band rock which doesn't do them any favours (Wayne Kramer engagingly explains in the sleevenotes that they listened to playbacks of their second album at full volume and hence failed to realise how thin it sounded.) They were wild, they were full of it, and they were more than a bit ridiculous, but they rocked a good deal harder than Quicksilver Messenger Service. Kick out the jams, melonfarmers, indeed.
5 people found this helpful
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