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4.4 out of 5 stars
55
4.4 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
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on 13 April 2017
It is totally depraved filth and entirely complementary to my lifestyle. Sets me up nicely in advance of my Sunday prayer meetings.
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on 13 April 2017
Arrived as promised promptly
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on 23 April 2017
very funny
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on 5 May 2017
Hilarious but very very crude, not for the easily offended.
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on 15 August 2017
Laugh e minute - if you are not a PC prude!
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on 14 August 2017
the holy grail of comedy
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on 30 January 2014
This intellectual masterpiece by Cook and Moore cuts a swathe through the vast plethora of comedic offerings which can only aspire to be a fraction as humorous as this cleverley conceived foray through the magical world of Joan Crawfords' frontal derriere and the juxtaposition of public toilet characters Derek and Clive in a cubicle situation.
An equally masterful performance as two quintessentially ''Laaahndun'' mini cab drivers sees the interplay of anecdotal snippets of liasons with Bertrand Russell and Lord Bradwell cast an almost unprecedented insight into how the lives of the aristocratic and learned collide with the terminally fetid lives of those who are but one rung of the social ladder above those who weild a toilet brush.
'Hav in gawank' explores the joys and sorrows of life as we hear Derek firstly expressing the pleasure of having his membership in a lubricated toilet roll inner which was electrically connected to a train set causing sexual pleasure to ensue,which shows clearly the transition between childhood and youth. This later takes a downward plunge into disease and death. ''I've got cancer of the mortgage, cancer of the season ticket..........'', laments Clive. Priceless.
There are moments of musical joy too, as Derek sings an ode to his mother that brings a tear of bittersweet Oediposal climax to the eye in much the same way as Puccinis' operas. A truly uplifting and spiritually ascending selection of lifes finer moments pours into ones soul with all the force of high - level cistern. Magnifique!
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on 6 February 2007
Pete and Dud, sometime in the early seventies, mutated into Derek and Clive, a pair of Tory-voting, heavy-drinking, football-loving toilet attendants who have an opinion on everything, think the world's gone mad and are deeply embarrassed by women. For Derek and Clive, everything went downhill after the death of Buddy Holly and the Big Bopper. And it's this peculiarly British mindset - a combination of drunken menace and a willingness to talk utter nonsense for several minutes at the drop of a hat - that the two erstwhile satirists tap into over the course of the three Derek and Clive albums. There are more 'real life' Dereks and Clives around than you might think. 'Come Again' is by far the most outrageous and offensive of the albums ('Ad Nauseum' tries hard, but feels disjointed and some of the ideas are non-starters) as the duo ruminate on cancer, masturbation, gay members of parliament, the genitalia of Hollywood stars, incest and the unfairness of the traffic laws. Although it's hard to choose, the most uproarious sketch is still 'My Mum Song' (a misleadingly twee title) in which Dudley Moore alternates between improvising an obscene ditty and collapsing into gibbering hysterics, and Peter Cook alternates between trying to restrain him and trying to make him laugh even harder (he succeeds). This was punk comedy a full five years before the Young Ones, and time has been kinder to it as well.
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on 29 November 2001
Peter Cook is, and has always been unique in his delivery of humour, genius particularly with the obscure. When he joined Dudley Moore so many years ago, their performances became noteworthy.
When two fundamentally intellectual people reduce themselves to the lowest form of humour, what are you left with? In this case, Derek and Clive.
So is it good? Oh yes. However, explaining why is somewhat more difficult to answer. Not for the faint of heart, or the easily offended, Derek and Clive illustrate comic genius at its very frontier, constantly tempting the 'line that must not be crossed'.
For those that read this and feel none the wiser, you are one step closer to understanding Derek and Clive.
Buy it, Listen to it, enjoy it or hate it. But do listen to it.
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on 4 October 2003
If you like your humour subtle and politically correct then this is certainly not for you. If you want to hear two late and great comedians swearing and shouting and generally being as offensive and outrageous as possible then this is for you. Peter Cook is at his surreal and sublime best here and Dudley Moore tries and fails to not laugh out loud, in fact that is the beauty of it. You find yourself rolling about as Dudley screams with laughter at what Peter has to say. I listen to a bit of this CD at least once a day and all the better I am for it. Anyone and everyone is the target of their acid wit and even the unshockable will find themselves wincing a good few times before the CD plays itself out. Great stuff!!!!!!
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