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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
39
4.7 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£7.15+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


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on 13 March 2017
A+
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on 24 October 2001
On buying this album i was truly amazed by Winston Rodneys voice his heart felt vocals on songs such as Give me what is mine and the widely known (through advertisment) Days of Slavery really get in side of you the dub version is superb i can't wait to hear another Burning Spear album.
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on 4 August 2012
When it worked the great thing about seventies reggae was an album or even track followed by the dub version. This is a killer. 1975-the release of "Marcus Garvey". Followed a year later by "Garvey's Ghost". I didn't come across them until 1980. On vinyl in our house both albums were cranked up and thrashed. Winston Rodney at his imperious best, although I admit the dub version had more air time. So, have they stood the test of time? More than I would judge. The tracks on "Marcus Garvey" have a freshness, they engage. Like a lot of Jamaican reggae of this period they have a social/political focus. Slavery, emancipation and standing tall against colonisation. A celebration of the liberationist Marcus Garvey in a mix of Rastafarian and reclaiming music and roots. "Garvey's Ghost" is one of the classic dub albums. The sound is pulverising, sonic, bass deep and layered. "Black Wa-Da Da-Da" stands out with the opening vocals spinning out into an interplay of instruments in free fall shifting in and out of dub. A collage of sound bitten into by snatches of vocals. But kicking off with "The Ghost" the guitar, piano and organ chutter along in increasing layers of echo. A master class. and produced without a computer in sight with whatever studio equipment could be tinkered with to get some truly unique sounds.
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on 21 July 2007
In my humble opinion, this is a better album than any by Bob Marley. Although Marley had some excellent tunes, I never thought he stretched it over a whole album.
Marcus Garvey/Garvey's Ghost is superb throughout. There is no filler on here.
Rodney's voice is plaintive, rousing, many other things that I can't put into words. If you don't feel anything listening to 'Slavery Days' then you're either deaf, or dead.
This is essential roots, especially at the price.
It's interesting to note that the dub version, Garvey's Ghost, was significantly 'lightened' as it was thought, by the record company gimps, not to appeal to European or American listeners.
I'd love to hear the album as it was originally intended.
If you're only going to have a handful of reggae albums in your collection, make sure this is one of them.
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on 11 February 2012
I have been a massive reggae fan since my teens (52 now) and although ive always loved burning spear
i have only just had the pleasure of hearing this album.
The only problem with most reggae artists is the shear volume of material they put out
and you dont always get time to listen to everything.
But let me assure anyone thinking of buying this album you must do it!!
The dubwise versions are just out of this world and i recently emmbarrased myself on the train to work listening
through headphones and skanking in my seat!! (took me back to my youth!!)
Please buy and listen to it LOUD...
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on 27 November 2000
Garveys Ghost, the dub version of Marcus Garvey is simply the best hour of sound you could ever buy. If you like your reggae heavy, slow and roots then you can not buy anything better. The simple, perfectly performed bass lines will send you into a trance whilst the occasional vocal by the the master, Winston Rodney, will spin your head and leave floating on the rhythm. The last album I would ever get rid of from my collection.
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on 11 July 2003
At this price this album is a steal. Buy it now!
Why?...
I like ska/roots/dub and have a little knowledge of those genres. I have always heard the name 'Burning Spear' and seen his albums on the shelf however until I read the reviews here I had always been wary of getting this title as I thought the low low price must be a concession for a poor quality recording or a lot of filler tracks. I'm glad to say I couldn't have been more wrong.
For those who like Bob Marley and more mainstream reggae the first album will definitely satisfy. Each track is a classic with brilliant musicians bringing the best from some fantastic tunes (fantastic horns). Rodney's amazing wistful voice is warm and melancholy and he sings these songs with heart. Incidentally it was Marley who apparently first discovered Rodney and directed him to Coxsone Dodd at Studio One.
The dub album also drips with quality, this time Jack Ruby dropping in and out the instruments with great effect and a minimum of unnecessary sound effects. As another reviewer says it's more of an instrumental version than esoteric dub but again that should only widen the appeal of this album.
It's a classic, what more can I say?
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on 9 April 2011
I don't really know much about reggae, but i do like good Jamaican sounds from the mid-late 70s and have been filling in some of the blanks in my knowledge. I knew the name of Burning Spear for years, but don't really think I'd listened to any. So i bought this on the recommendations of various reviews here, expecting something quite worthy but maybe a bit dull. All I can say is that putting the record on was like having gone into a restaurant that looked like every other food joint on the street but getting served the most sumptious and wholesome meal I've ever had. The right mix of heavy rhythms, top notch vocals and powerful lyrics.
Just buy it!
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VINE VOICEon 5 June 2007
I'm a rock fan really, but this is a genre that throws up some classic albums that deserve more recognition. 'Marcus Garvey' still sounds fresh. It hits a wonderful groove from beginning to end. I think of it as more cultural and spiritual in feel, despite the political subject matter. Winston Rodney's delivery is compelling and instrumental accompaniment is flawless. From the resounding echoes of 'Days Of Slavery' to the jaunty melody of 'Tradition' this is a deeply satisfying album. Great basslines too.
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on 5 September 2010
Unfortunately due to some inexplicaple long-standing, deep-rooted prejudice against reggae music in the mass media, reggae for most people begins and ends with Bob Marley. The situation is so weird that reggae/ska tunes often do very well when covered by white English or American artists - e.g. The Tide Is High, Love of the Common People. As any reggae enthusiast is aware this is a must-have classic, featuring original and dub versions of the tracks. At under a fiver why wouldn't you buy it?
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