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on 18 September 2017
Great album glad to have it in my collection.
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on 22 April 2017
Great cd. Good to relax with.
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on 13 April 2017
Doesn't get much better than this!
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This is definitely an album that should be on the list of top ten jazz albums to hear before you die. I think this for two reasons. Firstly, it is an interesting meeting between the old and the new. There are a couple of old standards here (Autumn Leaves and Love For Sale), which are given a `modern jazz' treatment, then a series of originals including the dreamily bluesy `Somethin Else' from Miles Davis. It shows how the old trad styles were giving way to the new bop sound. The second reason is that, musical history interest aside, it is an absolutely exquisite album. As well as alto sax man Adderley, there is Miles Davis on trumpet and Art Blakey on drums. With that much talent in the studio this could have been a bit of a mess as everyone competed for the limelight, but no, something truly exceptional resulted. A languorous, blue album of extended solos which just sweep you along. It's as beautiful a work of art as you could wish to hear. Adderley and Davis recorded `Kind Of Blue' a year later, regarded as one of the best jazz albums aver, but somewhat heretically I consider this to be better and more accessible.

This Rudy Van Gelder edition is pretty good. To my untutored ears the remastering is excellent, with a crisp clear tone that sounds good on my stereo. There is a good separation, and each musician can be heard clearly where it matters. There is an interesting extra in the form of the more hard bop Rangoon, which adds to the album considerably. A 5 star release of a 6 star album.
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 4 June 2013
This excellent quintet album led by the great alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley(1928-1975) was recorded for BLUE NOTE in New Jersey on March 9, 1958.
Adderley is in lyrical and exuberant form with equally fine playing from Miles Davis(trumpet) and a superb rhythm section of Hank Jones(piano); Sam Jones(bass) & Art Blakey(drums).
The six memorable tracks feature three standards plus originals from Miles, Nat Adderley and Hank Jones. Highlights include 'Autumn Leaves', Miles' title-track and Hank Jones boppish bonus track 'Bangoon' previously issued as 'Alison's Uncle'.
'Somethin' Else' is one of Cannonball Adderley's finest albums and an essential item in any serious modern jazz collection.
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on 15 May 2009
Some reviewers suggest that in reality this is a Miles Davis session - but in fact this record actually shows why Cannonball was such an excellent bandleader - his warmth and generosity is demonstrated by the fact that he only takes one brief solo in the stand-out Autumn Leaves, letting Miles take three - how tempting to dominate the first wonderful track. Listen to other great records such as Mercy Mercy Mercy to hear the way he talks about his band - lovely man. What really makes this album one of the true jazz essentials is the contrast between Miles' spare, bone-dry playing and Cannonball's warm, lyrical, ever-playful alto. They complement each other perfectly. Cannonball fan though I am, the stand-out moment of the record is the end of Autumn Leaves - the pace slows even further and Miles' trumpet almost breathes rather than plays - truly sublime.
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If you know and love Miles Davis from the late 1950s `Kind of Blue' period but haven't heard anything recorded under Julian `Cannonball' Adderley's own name, you're likely to love and appreciate `Somethin Else.' It's the perfect Blue Note companion to KoB and in the same groove, with superlative playing throughout from Adderley on alto sax and Miles on trumpet together with Hank Jones on piano, and a rhythm section made up of Art Blakey on drums and Sam Jones on bass.

It's difficult to pick out highlights on a collection so uniformly excellent, but the 11-minute opener `Autumn Leaves' is a true jazz classic which you'll think you've always known, so recognisably familiar is the melody. The title track, showcasing the horn interplay between Miles and Cannonball chasing each other all over the scales in an exuberant and up-tempo duet sounds like a cut which escaped from the KoB sessions, and `One for Daddy-O' with its slower tempo and stand-out uncomplicated melody also shines. In the sparse, clean and bluesy `Dancing in the Dark' we hear Cannonball at his soulful best, his horn soaring with a long, slow-tempo solo over a perfectly understated rhythm.

The music here is instantly accessible, with nothing unnecessarily complex or jarring. You can listen to the album again and again, no matter what you're doing, though one or two of the numbers are perhaps a little up-tempo for dinner-party background ambience. Overall `Somethin Else' is an indispensable jazz classic which stands shoulder-to-shoulder with the very best of Miles, Trane or Charlie Parker.
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This is definitely an album that should be on the list of top ten jazz albums to hear before you die. I think this for two reasons. Firstly, it is an interesting meeting between the old and the new. There are a couple of old standards here (Autumn Leaves and Love For Sale), which are given a `modern jazz' treatment, then a series of originals including the dreamily bluesy `Somethin Else' from Miles Davis. It shows how the old trad styles were giving way to the new bop sound. The second reason is that, musical history interest aside, it is an absolutely exquisite album. As well as alto sax man Adderley, there is Miles Davis on trumpet and Art Blakey on drums. With that much talent in the studio this could have been a bit of a mess as everyone competed for the limelight, but no, something truly exceptional resulted. A languorous, blue album of extended solos which just sweep you along. It's as beautiful a work of art as you could wish to hear. Adderley and Davis recorded `Kind Of Blue' a year later, regarded as one of the best jazz albums aver, but somewhat heretically I consider this to be better and more accessible.
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VINE VOICEon 29 February 2004
This was very much a collaborative effort between Cannonball Adderley and the master himself, Miles Davis, in a rare guest appearance. Adderley was part of Miles' sextet that recorded 'Milestones' around the same time as this recording, and Miles was returning the favour. Miles is, if anything, more dominant on this album than his own.
The beautiful opener 'Autumn Leaves',one of the truly great jazz recordings, is an example of this, as Miles takes three solos to Adderley's one, playing the theme at the beginning and end. The arrangement of this standard is inspired, the piano intro and outro by Hank Jones work superbly well, and Miles is at his lyrical, moody best.
'Love For Sale' is also excellent, particularly Miles' contribution, and it is interesting to compare with the version by Miles' sextet, including Adderley, recorded a few months later, and found on '58 Sessions.'
After those two slow/medium tracks, Miles' own 'Somethin Else' raises the tempo and contains blistering interplay between the two men, both playing brilliantly in a joyful and exuberant performance.
Adderley redresses the balance with 'Dancing in the Dark,' where he takes the only lead role and slowly builds momentum and emotion in his playing.
'One for Daddy O' is another fine track featuring both soloists in great form, and although the additional 'Rangoon' is a pefectly decent performance, the album would be as good without it, as it was in its original form, with Dancing in the Dark' as the closing track.
A classic album, and in my opinion the best of all Blue Note recordings; a must for fans of either star (and the supporting cast isn't bad either including Art Blakey on drums!) It offers yet another element to Miles' remarkable late 50s music, arguably the greatest period of his career.
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on 24 August 2008
Somethin' Else: Remastered

Quite by chance I caught just three or four bars of the theme of "Autumn Leaves" on the radio. It was so obviously Miles, and at his very best. I immediately decided, on the basis of that brief snatch of melody, to try to get the CD. But it was not easy to run it down as, of course, the band was under the (nominal) leadership of Cannonball Adderley.

This is a wonderful CD with all players on top form and I heartily endorse what other reviewers have said. It is worth its modest price just for that exposition of the beautiful "Autumn Leaves" theme!
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