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Customer reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
13
High and Mighty
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£24.99+ £1.26 shipping


on 26 March 2012
This was the turning point for Uriah Heep, being the last album featuring the great David Byron, but not the best album they produced. Still, it has some good tracks and a pop at the music critics who never took to them (sad gits!).
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on 14 April 2013
not every ones favorite byron era heep lp but i think its a classic the first side is just terrific the second side of the old vinyl is the ones that lets the album slip a little but these unusual cuts lend to lots of listening showing heep not just as out rockers but as sensitive composers aswell,
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on 17 October 2017
All is O.K.
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on 3 February 2018
good.
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on 5 June 2015
This has a fresh sound and some very strong tracks - the first side (tracks 1-4) are great and Confession ends the original album very nicely - "I'm so sorry for the things I've done..." sings Byron. No doubt the band were sorry too and found a new singer soon after.

Who could not be moved by Byrons vocals and the melodies of Midnight, Weep In Silence etc? One Way Or Another is a great ballsy rock track (which I did not realise was sung by the bass player) and by far the heaviest offering here.

One negative re: remaster version - Weep In Silence extended does NOT sound like an original alternate take - more like the exact original track that has just been made longer by copying bits (the sought of trick we did as kids with cassette recorders).
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on 22 June 2010
This album, has several standout tracks such as the opener "One Way Or Another" (a duet between John Wetton and Ken Hensley ), the extraordinary "Weep In Silence" and "Footprints In The Snow, both songs co-penned by Wetton and Hensley and the beautiful ballad "Confession" similar to "The Easy Road" from the "WONDERWORLD" album. The rest of the album is full of rockers like "Can't Keep A Good Band Down" or "Make A Little Love" and "Misty Eyes" . The problem with this album, seems to be the mix and the sound. Something is wrong with the mix and the sound, with some sounding as good as ever such as the opener "One Way or Another", "Confession", "Weep in Silence" and "Footprints in the Snow"., The new expanded version contains some leftovers and demos from main songwriter Ken Hensley. This was also David Byron last album with the band.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 6 December 2008
The title says it all a band completely out of touch with themselves and what the fans wanted, incredible that this could follow 'Return To Fantasy' which was their biggest selling album in the UK at that point,its mostly dross as the band have said many times ,lightweight,tired ideas poor rehashes of what went before.,recorded by a band that had clearly lost the plot,clearly unable to have any quality control this is arguably the worst heep album ever,to open an album without Byron singing was incredibly stupid,no doubt ken thought he was top dog,only 'cant keep a good band down' and maybe one or two other worthy of a mention,sad end to a great singer,thankfully john lawton and trevor bolder would save the day 2.5 stars
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on 23 November 2013
Uriah Heep is one of those bands that would have been in the eternal rock pantheon if they had quit while the going was good (first 5 albums). This album isn't one of the first five. It's still Uriah Heep, but the song material is much worse than their iconic hits. Good album for the fans and the collectors, but if you're new to the band you're better off with a greatest hits collection
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on 6 January 2009
In 1976 Uriah Heep was a total mess. David Byron was just about to be sacked (again) and the year before Ken Hensley (cause of Byrons behaviour and drug abuse) had even left the band before Gerry Bron persuaded him to come back again. Upon release High And Mighty wasn't what Heep fans expected. It wasn't heavy and it didn't really conatin any big rockers.

On the album the band (or rather Hensley who more or less considered this as a kind of solo record) tries different styles and sound more MOR than they ever did before (or after). Back in '76 I thought this was a bit disapointening, but listening to it now in it's remastered and expanded format it's really not as bad as I once thought.

Some of the reason for this is that it has perhaps aged better than say 'Return To Fantasy' as it doesn't sound that dated. And there is some really good tracks here even if the album itself is an uneven affair. The first track, One Way or Another, even has John Weetton and Ken Hensley on main vocal, but it's still pretty good and listening to it now I seem to appreciate the variations on the record a lot more than in 76. I guess age is a good thing in some ways...

As for the bonustracks, and there's quite a lot of em here, it's not that interesting as I first had hoped. Name of the Game is quite enjoyable and sounds like Heep around 73/74. But there's also 4 Ken Hensley demos mostly of the albumtracks but with other titles making you believe this is new tracks when you see the tracklisting. A bit confusing in other words. Still at a real bargain price High and Mighty is well worth checking out if you are a Heep fan. And it's still way better than some of the non Byron albums that would follow (Innocent Victim, Fallen Angel etc).

David Byron went on to form Rough Diamond who released their self titled (and only) album in 1977. If you're a fan of Heep, and Byron, around this era it's really worth picking up if you're able to find it. And it's even better than High And Mighty.
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on 18 November 2015
From "Very 'eavy, veru 'umble" on towards the excellent live album and finally "Return to Fantasy" Uriah Heep was top notch. They could easyly compete with the likes of contemporaries Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, Ten Years After, to name just a few (of my personal favorites). After that, with the loss of brilliant bass player Gary Thain, the band lost control. Consisting of only Hensley penned tracks and self produced, this is not a standout album. No "hard rock", no progressive rock, in which the band excelled, but rather lightweight songs, easyly forgettable. Ironically only the second bonus track "Sundown" comes close to the sound developed on "Return to Fantasy", but lacks its quality. You may or maybe not like every track on the predecessor but that is a far better outing. Even its outtakes "Shout it Out Loud" and "The Time Will Come" (single B-sides only) could have done more justice by including on High and Mighty, Instantly it would have restored the balance somewhat. My opinion is that this is a rather lackluster affair and not a fitting testament of one of the greatest rockbands from the (early) seventies. Alas!
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