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4.6 out of 5 stars
34
4.6 out of 5 stars
Goodbye
Format: Audio CD|Change
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on 1 September 2017
Cream made some great albums. Although this is great it could have had more tracks.
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on 9 June 2017
Sad to remember break up but didn't they do well.
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on 20 November 2013
originally a very short album expanded on vinyl , best track is sitting on top of the world slower piece with up lifting guitar solo also a good version of sunshine of your love on side a. side two is good but the extra tracks are available on cd else where on expanded versions of cream albums.the vinyl sounds good no clicks or pops that you sometimes get even with new albums
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on 8 December 2013
takes me back to my vynil days. happy memories, saw them do this live back then, still the best band
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VINE VOICEon 14 November 2002
This album was released after the band had already split.
Three great live tracks and three great studio tracks.
I'm So Glad, Politician and Sitting On Top of the World are the live cuts and splendid they are too. Great trio interplay with guitar and bass slightly better recorded than Gingers drums. Jack's tonsils get some work out.
Badge is Eric Clapton's studio track and is a really fine song with some fine pumping bass from Jack behind Eric's singing.
Doing That Scrapyard Thing is an off the wall belter from Jack Bruce with completely silly lyrics and a cheeky vocal performance.
What A Bringdown penned by Ginger Baker is a winner too. The album sleeve credits Ginger with vocals but it sounds like Eric to me? Jack wails the loud bits. Its a very percussive track as one would expect. Fine work from Jack on piano and organ.
The fourth of four fantastic Cream recordings.
At their best one of the most exciting groups ever. Cream used improvisation more than any other group outside of jazz. I guess thats why most so called rock journalists dont like them now. They were far too adventurous and unpredictable. Not for them the never ending cliches of the so called superstar groups who went on for years playing the same stuff year in and year out.
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on 24 January 2004
Cream's studio music falls, at first sight, into three periods. The first ('Fresh Cream') was when the band were trying, with varying degress of success, to establish their sound. The second was the psychedelic 'Disraeli' one, when they gained their commercial success (the earlier 'Fresh Cream' material didn't sell very well). The third was the progressive material, represented by 'White Room' and so on. Then the band split, and this 'posthumous' recording was rather ignored by record buyers at the time, though a fair number of keen Cream fans bought it.
In my opinion, 'Goodbye' suggests that the band made a really big mistake in splitting when they did. There are some truly great tracks on here, easily as good as anything on their other albums, and in several cases considerably better. In some ways it represents a fourth type of Cream music, totally proficient technically, with great songwriting that had left the Blues way behind and was taking them far beyond what they'd already achieved on their earlier albums. 'Badge' is just one such example.
Personally, I think that Jack, Ginger and Eric all went downhill after this album. Blind Faith led nowhere; the Baker Gurvitz Army were interesting, but perhaps the earlier Gun were better; Jack sacrificed sheer excitement for jazz and complexity; Ginger headed into jazz, but it's a very challenging style in which few can be true masters; and Eric became very popular, but with his amplifier turned down and many fans longing for blistering 'Bluesbreaker' type material that never truly re-materialised.
Creativity often relies on tension, and there was tension a plenty in Cream, thanks to Bruce and Baker's arguments and fistfights when they were in the Graham Bond Organisation. Maybe this album is great because those tensions helped drive the creative process, and when Bruce and Baker went their separate ways, the energy was somehow lost. In some ways this album reminds me of Abbey Road; both the Beatles and Cream were supposedly finished, but both their final albums were stunningly good. How many other artists have gone out like that? None that I can think of. One can't imagine Cream going all through the Seventies banging out 'Sunshine of your love' and so on, so maybe it was time to say goodbye. But the entire heavy metal/hard rock scene derives, in large part, from Cream, even if people don't want to admit it. So in that sense, Cream might have found continued success. We'll never know. At least they never made a bad album, and this one is as good as any. If they had to call it a day, this was the best way to bow out.
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on 3 January 2008
Simply one of the greatest rock albums ever released. Or, if you like, three of the greatest live tracks ever released with 3 studio tracks added on but not an 'album'. What does it matter? Because the only thing wrong with this CD is that it doesn't contain a fourth live track instead of, or in addition to, the three short studio tracks.
With CD allowing much more space than the original LP it's a disgrace that Polydor haven't rectified this. With one or two extra live tracks it would have the makings of what discophiles like to think of as an 'album' and people compiling recommended discographies might stop moaning about it being a(n)(arbitrary) hodge podge and completely forgetting to rate it primarily on the musical quality of the individual tracks rather than as some sort of meaningful, tidy or satisfying arrangement of numbers.
This 'record' has been sadly undervalued ever since its release simply because it is neither a studio album nor a live album although there was an obvious reason for this since there were 3 studio tracks left over after Cream broke up. The three very well chosen live numbers which were added used up all the remaining space on the vinyl format. What more could people want?

But a friendly warning, this is not for the fainthearted, or the musically fainthearted. These live tracks need to be given total concentrated attention, the sort of attention you would give to a Beethoven development section. Nevertheless, music of this split-brain intensity in the playing, and Nietzschean heroism in the vocals, is not for everyone, and I fear there's nothing to be done about that. But I suppose there is always the much tamer 'Wheels of Fire' studio album which has two of these numbers, 'Politician' and 'Sitting On Top of The World' for those who want something less demanding - primarily less demanding in terms of passion; the concentrated contrapuntal tension is what is necessary to produce it. But when Bruce is on good vocal form, as he is here, his singing is immeasurably more passionate than anything he or anyone else, except perhaps Plant, could achieve in the studio.

For those who do appreciate this album there is unfortunately only one other disc to match it. That is the live 'Wheels Of Fire' disc with the very famous 'Crossroads' and the 16min live version of 'Spoonful'. I think this live 'Spoonful' is probably the finest, and noblest, achievement of rock music so far, both on account of Bruce's vocal performance and the superbly maintained tension and architecture of the long middle section. I have heard quite a few of their live Spoonfuls on bootlegs etc. but this one is undoubtedly the best. The three live tracks on 'Goodbye' run it pretty close and are the next most important pieces we have.
However, it is also worth knowing that there are at least 2 very fine live performances on 'Live Cream Vol.2' ( Sunshine Of Your Love and Politician) and that there is a longer and better version of N.S.U. to be found (only)as part of the 4disc set 'Those Were The Days' which also contains better stereo balanced mixes of the less satisfactory ones on both 'Live Cream Vols.1 and 2'.
But the stereo mixes of these three tracks are as good as they can be, and 'I'm So Glad' in particular is far better than the mix in the box-set. The other mix of 'Glad' is only useful if you want to study exactly what Clapton is playing since the lead guitar is brought much further forward. Unfortunately this destroys the competitive balance with the bass and the performance ends up being a bit less exciting than it is on this original album.

It's obvious that what the record company should have done long ago (as soon as Cream started appearing on CD) is to move the studio tracks on this album to the Wheels Of Fire studio album where they really belong and would work well as fillers to bulk it up a bit. The remaining live tracks on the other two live albums should have been supplemented with various other live tracks which have emerged since the original vinyl albums - there is at least one bootleg in fine quality of an Oakland concert which has different versions of Spoonful, Crossroads, Sunshine and others, and there is another Sunshine released on a Clapton CD single as a third track as well as the NSU mentioned above in the box set. There are also different performances of Crossroads, Sunshine and Spoonful on wolfgangsvault.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 20 January 2012
Cream's 1969 farewell album was the end of an era in British music, and the end of the most creative and musically brilliant era in the lives of each of the three members. The tensions within the group were a double edged sword, on the one hand driving them to greater musical heights, on the other making it impossible for the three to work together. It is a shame that the destructive won out over the constructive. Musically the three were at the top of their game here. The sound had moved on a little from the raw power of their first release and the psychadelia tinge of Disraeli Gears, a more polished style is in evidence. The album comprises of three studio and three live recordings, and shows the full range of the trios talents as musicians. Powerful, but with a smoother edge, still laden with coruscating intensity and visionary boundary pushing, this really was the apogee of the British blues movement in the `60s, the point towards which all those bands from Chris Barber to John Mayall to Alexis Korner had worked. It was never better. 5 star album.

This version also contains 'Anyone For Tennis', released as a non-album single, as an extra. Well worth a listen.
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on 29 December 2016
This is just a CD copy pressed on vinyl, It does not have a gatefold sleeve, there are no production credits, remastering etc, so if you want to hear something that will do the original some justice look for Creams Vinyl reissues, now you can get them individually, instead of the entire box set. You are wasting your money on this drivel, even the Sleeve is poor quality.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 20 January 2012
Cream's 1969 farewell album was the end of an era in British music, and the end of the most creative and musically brilliant era in the lives of each of the three members. The tensions within the group were a double edged sword, on the one hand driving them to greater musical heights, on the other making it impossible for the three to work together. It is a shame that the destructive won out over the constructive. Musically the three were at the top of their game here. The sound had moved on a little from the raw power of their first release and the psychadelia tinge of Disraeli Gears, a more polished style is in evidence. The album comprises of three studio and three live recordings, and shows the full range of the trios talents as musicians. Powerful, but with a smoother edge, still laden with coruscating intensity and visionary boundary pushing, this really was the apogee of the British blues movement in the `60s, the point towards which all those bands from Chris Barber to John Mayall to Alexis Korner had worked. It was never better. 5 star album.
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