Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
16
4.6 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£10.40+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 10 May 2017
Loved the music on the Virgin Media ad and went out of my way to find it - Dick Dale was a new name to me but reading about him and listening to this CD - you know where the Beach Boys and the Shadows drew some of their inspiration. Makes you want to get up and dance.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 April 2017
Great find. Bought this to get the track that is used on the Virgin media fibre optics advert. This cd also contains music used in Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction. If you like 1962 surf music this is the cd for you. Fab.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 July 2017
Wife loves it, bought because of the Virgin Internet advert song, but all the tunes are superb, she is very happy and can't stop listening to it.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 May 2017
very good ,love the slide guitar sound,excellent.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 May 2017
fine and perfect
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 August 2009
I saw a mention to Dick Dale somewhere, did a little research, liked what I heard and got this on a whim. It's a great album with loads of tunes you will recognise (e.g. one of the iconic tunes from Pulp Fiction) or start tapping along to anyway. The speed and undistorted clarity of the guitar is brilliant to listen too - real infectious good music for sunny days.
11 Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Like many of us oldies I suspect I wasn't really that aware of surf music for the brief period when it flowered in the US and my appreciation wasn't triggered until Tarantino put surf on the map for a much wider audience in the early nineties. At the time, I only really associated surf music with Chuck Berry pastiches from the Beach Boys - sorry BB's, your really good records came later. Also at the time we had the Shadows to keep us ticking along in the UK - we mainly looked to the US for the Ventures - and the actual surf explosion on our own beaches was yet to take place - trust me on that, I was brought up in Newquay!

But Pulp Fiction changed everything and I did find my long latent love for surf coming to the fore. I even managed to see this great man live in the UK and he was quite something. Dick Dale was different from the other surfies. All the rest were bands of, presumably, spotty youths, Dale already seemed to be a man. More of the Duane Eddy generation but even tougher. Surf music, particularly from Dick, didn't really do the quiet ones that Duane would occasionally perform, it was all straight ahead instrumental rock, sometimes just guitar, bass and drums. Other times with a roaring sax- again not unlike Duane (though less of a parody of rock sax as sometimes was the case with Duane records).

Enough of comparisons. What about the music herein? It's all pretty straight ahead rock. Track 1 "Let's go trippin'" sets the pace with an in-your-face twelve bar jumper with some R&B feel creeping in. On Track 2 he unleashes an even more fierce guitar. And track 3 is is the great "Miserlou", the one for which he'll be recorded his rightful place in the history of rock'n'roll. He really loved the odd middle eastern sounding item like this - checkout also "Have Nagila", a number that was also loved by UK beat groups at that time, and also "Banzai Washout", a stormer. There's also the other popular instro "(Ghost) Riders in the Sky".

We do get some vocal touches but they don't distract from the main thrust. "Mr Peppermint Man" is a slow, ominous, almost threatening song - the otherwise excellent Notes don't tell me who the singer is.

The far greater appreciation of the US public for surf music is evidenced by Stevie Ray Vaughan joining in with our hero on a very nice version of "Pipeline" which closes the album in style. I've always found it interesting that US reviewers often find touches of surf music in the background of current groups. It does seem much more part of the musical heritage across the pond.

I confess that my appreciation of Dick didn't take me digging into his albums - I contented myself with this best-of (though also looked into his new stuff) but I think it entirely likely that he was really a singles man, in which case, a best-of is invariably a good buy. This one certainly is.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 December 1999
This album collects together the best of Dick's tunes, all from the era of the longboard. The tunes differ as much from modern surf "thrash" as the surfing styles now differ. With the re-emergence of the longboard as a cool surf tool, Dick Dale will become the sound of surf again
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 May 2012
Along with Link Wray Dick Dale showed what an iconic sound could be extracted with a little single minded vision.
A must for everyone to refer to now and again, like single malt.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 June 2013
The instrumental tracks are fine (that is why I bought the CD - and what Dick Dale is known for) but vocals I can do without!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)