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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
7

on 29 July 2009
First Prine I ever bought having seen the great man on The Old Grey Wistle Test many years ago. If you like songs well written with the odd twist and really well sung with some fantastic music Prine does not disappoint. There are lots more out there.
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on 25 August 2015
good all round service great cd
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on 1 April 2016
Nice CD, delivered in good condition.
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on 15 January 2015
First class cd enjoyable listning
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on 29 June 2015
Early JP but so full of quality!
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on 23 July 2014
Prine virgins can do worse than seek out his first three albums - Sweet Revenge , John Prine and this one . On the other two discs he is backed by the good ole boys from Muscle Shoals who provide a punchy altcountry type of backing . This has a more folky feel with spare simple backing from David Bromberg on electric guitar and mandolin , his brother Dave on fiddle and banjo , mate Steve Goodman on acoustic guitar and Steve Burgh on bass . The songs are brilliant and delivered in his trademark laidback twang . Always full of surprises , the album ends with John , Steve and Dave tingling the spine with an acapella version of the title track .
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on 8 April 2001
On this album, (one of my all-time favourite top three by Mr. Prine) his voice is raw, his words hard-hitting and his plaintive melodies as inventive as ever. There is a downbeat feel to this album, but the blues are part of human existence, and we sometimes need to tune into that spectrum, if only to then appreciate the light and hope that beams from the other end of the tunnel. So, don't expect a lot of jokes and humour on this CD, but do expect the cream of songwriting talent to regale your ears. "Ain't it funny, -how an old broken bottle, looks just like a diamond, when it's far, far away..." is one of John's lines that has remained firmly in my consciousness, especially any time I am out in the countryside and am reminded of the truth of his observation. Alongside his deeper, more social laments, we also have on this album a more personal note, -the wishing to name a drink after a certain (ex!?)-female partner, who has again caused the writer to turn for solace to the bottle. "Sour Grapes" has it's moral tale to tell, and "John Garfield Blues" wails at the loss of one held dear. In keeping with many another song-writer, such as Phil Ochs, John also makes various statements about the futilty and heartbreak around American involvements in warfare. "Take the Star out of The Window" relates to this, just as the line; "...we lost Davey in the Korean war, -still don't know what for..." (in another song), adeptly inserts comments as to the grief felt by relatives of those young men who 'disappeared' in these conflicts. If you'd like to sample one of the best of his mien, buy this album, and you will be affected for many a long year to come.
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