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Customer reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
6


on 9 January 2015
Revolution Of The Mind features a selection of tracks from live performances recorded at shows spanning a 3 day period at the Apollo Theater in New York during July 1971, presented on the album as a single concert.

The re-ordering of the setlist is a little obvious at the start with Brown's voice sounding hoarse and worn-out for the opening track (It's A New Day), before switching to full-power with the next (Bewildered). That aside, the rest of the CD flows so well that it's not obvious it's a patchwork selection. It sounds like one performance from start to finish, with the band and James Brown on fire throughout, burning their way through a Funk heavy setlist.

The mastering of the disc is excellent. This title has never been given a remaster since its original CD release in the early 1990's, so managed to avoid any "loudness war" issues. Consequently you can crank up the volume with pleasure.

1971 was clearly a peak year for James Brown as a live performer, so a comparison with the Love Power Peace CD recorded the same year is unavoidable, and it really is a toss-up as to which release is superior. Revolution Of The Mind has more of a high-octane Funked-up tracklist, whereas Love Power Peace is permeated with ballads. But Love Power Peace has the benefit of a good mix which gives a full punch to all the instruments, whereas Revolution Of The MInd serves more to showcase Brown's vocals at the expense of the band, unfortunately leaving the rhythm section somewhat in the shade. I would argue that given a remix to bring up the drums and bass and drop the vocals a little, Revolution Of The Mind would be THE killer James Brown live CD, no contest.

So to sum up, I'll give it a solid 4 star rating, held back from a 5 only by the mix.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 7 April 2016
'REVOLUTION OF THE MIND (Recorded Live At The Apollo Vol. III)' was James Brown's second album release under his new contract with Polydor Records. Originally released as Polydor PD-2-3003, the double-LP set made #7 in the R&B charts and #39 Pop, hot on the heels of his first release for the label, 'HOT PANTS.' It was also his third live album recorded at Harlem's famed Apollo Theater, the site of his original 1962 triumph, the fabled 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO.' Brown had recorded that album using his own money against the wishes of King Record's legendary honcho Syd Nathan because he knew what he had and believed in himself. James was right-on, the original 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO' became the release that cemented his stardom. His second release from that venue, the obviously titled 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO, Volume II' from 1967 was also his first double live album release, and to my knowledge the first double-album to be released by a black artist. By all means, when you get it (and you WILL get it) be sure you buy the expanded Deluxe Edition set. The new album was released in December 1971, just in time for the holiday season, and charted #7 R&B and #39 Pop. The album's tracks were culled from eight shows the band performed over their four day engagement. Brown's current batch of J.B.'s had only been together for three months, but under the guiding hand of band leader Fred Wesley the boys pulled it off in grand style. The band's performance may not be as spine-tingling as on the previous two, but Brown still can deliver the funk. The album also features the debut recording of Brown's longtime valet and master of ceremonies Danny "It's Star Time!" Ray......

The recording starts with a classic Danny Ray introduction, "Introducing the world's greatest entertainer, Mr. Dynamite, the amazing Mr. Please Please himself, the hardest working man in show business, ladies and gentlemen, the star of our show, James Brown!" Brown and the band breakout into a short "It's A New Day So Let A Man Come In And Do The Popcorn" that morphs into a lengthy "Bewildered," the old Tommy Dorsey hit that also later charted for Amos Milburn. It's the latter performance that probably informed Brown's. He had recorded an earlier more doo-wop flavored version with the Famous Flames that can be found on his third album 'THINK!.' Next up, Bobby Byrd joins James for a crowd-pleasing jaunt through "Sex Machine." Bobby stays for the next track, his boss's recent hit "Escape-ism." A call-and-response session with Byrd and the audience runs right into his then current hit "Make It Funky," featuring solos by Jimmy Parker on alto and Fred Wesley on trombone. James introduces the band in his usual way, by bantering and joking with them during the song's lengthy breakdown. During this schtick Brown shows his showbiz acumen, asking each member about his hometown, making the audience feel a more personal connection. Their are notable bursts of applause throughout the show during the musical sections when James isn't singing, that must be when he demonstrates his well-known terpsichorean prowess. The show takes it down a notch with the always popular with the ladies "Try Me," proven by their screams when introduced. A supercharged audience pleaser, the "Fast Medley" of "I Can't Stand It," "Mother Popcorn" and "I Got The Feelin'" lets the new boys show-off their chops. James then whips up excitement as the show gets consistently funkier, a warmly welcomed "Give It Up Or Turn It Lose" melds into a double-time "Super Bad" (with a wild St. Clair Pickney solo) continuing into a strutin' "Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved" duet Bobby Byrd (who knew public service could be so funky?) that finally explodes with "Soul Power." By now the frenzied audience has become his background vocalists. Brown leaves the stage and Danny Ray returns to up the intensity for James' re-entrance. James and the band smoke the audience one more time with his current hit "Hot Pants." Mr. Excitement leaves the stage and everyone goes hone, drained but happy. The Godfather Of Soul once again earns his titles....

It's a well-known fact that many "live albums" are tampered with, some are even completely faked. Some are obvious and sound terrible, as with Brown's own unfortunate 'SUPER BAD.' If this recording was fiddled with, it was very slight, everything sounds right on the money .James' voice is huskier than usual throughout which was probably caused by the extensive practice sessions, not to mention the eight shows from which this recording was taken. I'd give it 3 and 1/2 stars, it's a very good album and worth owning but I still give the nod to 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO, Volume II' as his best concert recording. All the recent Japanese Limited Edition reissues sound great, but a decent domestic reissue is still in print, so spending the extra $$$ is a personal choice. The new versions can be found reasonable if you search around (cdjapan $9.29 + postage). One more thing, it's worth noting that ALL the songs performed here were Top Ten R&B chart hits, seven hit #1! I've listed the song's original highest ranking in both the R&B and Pop charts after each title. As you can see, the fourteen made the Top Ten in the R&B charts, and all but one charted in the Top 40 Pop charts, with six making the Top 20. They don't call him "Soul Brother No. 1" for nothing.....

1. Intro / It's A New Day So Let A Man Come In And Do The Popcorn 3:47 (#2 R&B, #21 Pop)
2. Bewildered 7:55 (#7 R&B, #40 Pop)
3. Sex Machine 5:05 (#2 R&B, #15 Pop)
4. Escape-Ism* 3:04 (#6 R&b, #35 Pop)
5. Make It Funky* 12:52 (#1 R&B, #22 Pop)
6. Try Me 2:43 (#1 R&B, #48 Pop)
7. Fast Medley: (I Can't Stand It, Mother Popcorn, I Got The Feelin') 1:17 (#4/#1/#1 R&B, #28/#11/#6 Pop)
8. Give It Up Or Turnit A Loose 2:22 (#1 R&B, #15 Pop)
9. Call Me Super Bad 4:22 (#1 R&B, #13 Pop)
10. Get Up, Get Into It And Get Involved 3:21 (#4 R&B, #34 Pop)
11. Soul Power 6:36 (3# R&B, #29 Pop)
12. Hot Pants (She Got To Use What She Got To Get What She Wants) 8:35 (#1 R&B, #15 Pop)

(THe 2LP vinyl set is programmed: Side One: Tracks 1-3, Side Two: Tracks 4 & 5, Side Three: Tracks 6-10 and Side Four: Tracks 11 & 12)

Recorded July 24-25, 1971 at the Apollo Theater, New York, NY
James Brown - vocals, organ*
Bobby Byrd - organ & vocals
Robert Coleman - guitar
Hearlon "Cheese" Martin - guitar
Fred Thomas - bass
John "Jabo" Starks - drums
John Morgan - drums
Jimmy Parker - alto sax
St. Clair Pickney - tenor sax
Fred Wesley - trombone
Russell Crimes - trumpet
Jerone "Jaasan" Sanford - trumpet
Danny Ray - emcee
Arranged and Produced by James Brown
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 7 April 2016
'REVOLUTION OF THE MIND (Recorded Live At The Apollo Vol. III)' was James Brown's second album release under his new contract with Polydor Records. Originally released as Polydor PD-2-3003, the double-LP set made #7 in the R&B charts and #39 Pop, hot on the heels of his first release for the label, 'HOT PANTS.' It was also his third live album recorded at Harlem's famed Apollo Theater, the site of his original 1962 triumph, the fabled 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO.' Brown had recorded that album using his own money against the wishes of King Record's legendary honcho Syd Nathan because he knew what he had and believed in himself. James was right-on, the original 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO' became the release that cemented his stardom. His second release from that venue, the obviously titled 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO, Volume II' from 1967 was also his first double live album release, and to my knowledge the first double-album to be released by a black artist. By all means, when you get it (and you WILL get it) be sure you buy the expanded Deluxe Edition set. The new album was released in December 1971, just in time for the holiday season, and charted #7 R&B and #39 Pop. The album's tracks were culled from eight shows the band performed over their four day engagement. Brown's current batch of J.B.'s had only been together for three months, but under the guiding hand of band leader Fred Wesley the boys pulled it off in grand style. The band's performance may not be as spine-tingling as on the previous two, but Brown still can deliver the funk. The album also features the debut recording of Brown's longtime valet and master of ceremonies Danny "It's Star Time!" Ray......

The recording starts with a classic Danny Ray introduction, "Introducing the world's greatest entertainer, Mr. Dynamite, the amazing Mr. Please Please himself, the hardest working man in show business, ladies and gentlemen, the star of our show, James Brown!" Brown and the band breakout into a short "It's A New Day So Let A Man Come In And Do The Popcorn" that morphs into a lengthy "Bewildered," the old Tommy Dorsey hit that also later charted for Amos Milburn. It's the latter performance that probably informed Brown's. He had recorded an earlier more doo-wop flavored version with the Famous Flames that can be found on his third album 'THINK!.' Next up, Bobby Byrd joins James for a crowd-pleasing jaunt through "Sex Machine." Bobby stays for the next track, his boss's recent hit "Escape-ism." A call-and-response session with Byrd and the audience runs right into his then current hit "Make It Funky," featuring solos by Jimmy Parker on alto and Fred Wesley on trombone. James introduces the band in his usual way, by bantering and joking with them during the song's lengthy breakdown. During this schtick Brown shows his showbiz acumen, asking each member about his hometown, making the audience feel a more personal connection. Their are notable bursts of applause throughout the show during the musical sections when James isn't singing, that must be when he demonstrates his well-known terpsichorean prowess. The show takes it down a notch with the always popular with the ladies "Try Me," proven by their screams when introduced. A supercharged audience pleaser, the "Fast Medley" of "I Can't Stand It," "Mother Popcorn" and "I Got The Feelin'" lets the new boys show-off their chops. James then whips up excitement as the show gets consistently funkier, a warmly welcomed "Give It Up Or Turn It Lose" melds into a double-time "Super Bad" (with a wild St. Clair Pickney solo) continuing into a strutin' "Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved" duet Bobby Byrd (who knew public service could be so funky?) that finally explodes with "Soul Power." By now the frenzied audience has become his background vocalists. Brown leaves the stage and Danny Ray returns to up the intensity for James' re-entrance. James and the band smoke the audience one more time with his current hit "Hot Pants." Mr. Excitement leaves the stage and everyone goes hone, drained but happy. The Godfather Of Soul once again earns his titles....

It's a well-known fact that many "live albums" are tampered with, some are even completely faked. Some are obvious and sound terrible, as with Brown's own unfortunate 'SUPER BAD.' If this recording was fiddled with, it was very slight, everything sounds right on the money .James' voice is huskier than usual throughout which was probably caused by the extensive practice sessions, not to mention the eight shows from which this recording was taken. I'd give it 3 and 1/2 stars, it's a very good album and worth owning but I still give the nod to 'LIVE AT THE APOLLO, Volume II' as his best concert recording. All the recent Japanese Limited Edition reissues sound great, but a decent domestic reissue is still in print, so spending the extra $$$ is a personal choice. The new versions can be found reasonable if you search around (cdjapan $9.29 + postage). One more thing, it's worth noting that ALL the songs performed here were Top Ten R&B chart hits, seven hit #1! I've listed the song's original highest ranking in both the R&B and Pop charts after each title. As you can see, the fourteen made the Top Ten in the R&B charts, and all but one charted in the Top 40 Pop charts, with six making the Top 20. They don't call him "Soul Brother No. 1" for nothing.....

1. Intro / It's A New Day So Let A Man Come In And Do The Popcorn 3:47 (#2 R&B, #21 Pop)
2. Bewildered 7:55 (#7 R&B, #40 Pop)
3. Sex Machine 5:05 (#2 R&B, #15 Pop)
4. Escape-Ism* 3:04 (#6 R&b, #35 Pop)
5. Make It Funky* 12:52 (#1 R&B, #22 Pop)
6. Try Me 2:43 (#1 R&B, #48 Pop)
7. Fast Medley: (I Can't Stand It, Mother Popcorn, I Got The Feelin') 1:17 (#4/#1/#1 R&B, #28/#11/#6 Pop)
8. Give It Up Or Turnit A Loose 2:22 (#1 R&B, #15 Pop)
9. Call Me Super Bad 4:22 (#1 R&B, #13 Pop)
10. Get Up, Get Into It And Get Involved 3:21 (#4 R&B, #34 Pop)
11. Soul Power 6:36 (3# R&B, #29 Pop)
12. Hot Pants (She Got To Use What She Got To Get What She Wants) 8:35 (#1 R&B, #15 Pop)

(THe 2LP vinyl set is programmed: Side One: Tracks 1-3, Side Two: Tracks 4 & 5, Side Three: Tracks 6-10 and Side Four: Tracks 11 & 12)

Recorded July 24-25, 1971 at the Apollo Theater, New York, NY
James Brown - vocals, organ*
Bobby Byrd - organ & vocals
Robert Coleman - guitar
Hearlon "Cheese" Martin - guitar
Fred Thomas - bass
John "Jabo" Starks - drums
John Morgan - drums
Jimmy Parker - alto sax
St. Clair Pickney - tenor sax
Fred Wesley - trombone
Russell Crimes - trumpet
Jerone "Jaasan" Sanford - trumpet
Danny Ray - emcee
Arranged and Produced by James Brown
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on 14 January 2008
This is arguably the last great live recording of James Brown, as in my opinion this was made just about at the end of his reign as the King of Funk, just before disco changed the musical landscape and he lost his direction.
Having said that, it is still an awesome record, with a fantastic sequence where Soul Power and Get on Up, Get Into It and Get Involved are merged together with a fantastically funky call and response vamp with Bobby Byrd to link the two. And to top it off, the ferocious Hot Pants as the finale which tears the roof off the place. It's a consistently strong album all the way through however, and remains a must buy for JB fans. In my opinion, you need to own the following: James Brown live at the Apollo in 1962, then again in 1967 (I think it is 67), Live and Loud in Dallas (68), Love Power Peace (70), and finally this one to round it all off and bring the chapter to a close.
The previous reviewer complains about the quality of the recording-I'll agree the clarity isn't perfect, but it is still enough to capture the energy and the funk that is in all his other recordings-you won't be disappointed.
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on 1 February 2004
This CD can never be *five* stars until a reissue producer and remix engineer have a meeting of the minds and decide to present the songs in a sensible order and bring up the bass and drums. The sound is flat, and this is a shame considering the impact this set has had on the rapp/hip-hop generation. The audience is mixed in well but the rhythm section lags behind.
Having said that, we get an abundance of sonic excitement as Soul Brother Number One digs in for an unusually (compared to later efforts) driving performance, suggesting I'm here and I mean business! His rendition of the '40s torch song "Bewildered" makes one forget any similiar offer by Barry White, Luther Vandross, etc., while this track is in playback. It's "adult's only" territory, as is the uptempo "Give It Up Or Turnit A Loose", "Soul Power", and the furious finale "Hot Pants", eight minutes plus of Brown takin' it higher for the grateful attendees.
Let's hope we see a "Deluxe" edition with additional music and...yes...a decent mix.
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on 20 February 2014
AWSOME music, good recording.
This is probably the best recording ever of a James Brown concert, and at his prime.
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