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4.8 out of 5 stars
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4.8 out of 5 stars
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on 18 March 2005
.
I've waited for this film to come onto DVD for years. This is a good little road movie which teams up a young classical guitarist, who has an obsession with blues music and in particular Robert Johnsons missing song, with an 80 year old blues harmonica player, Willy Brown, held in a geriatric detention centre in New York. The kid breaks the old man out on the condition that they travel South to discover the missing song. Along the way the old mans terrible secret is let out - he made a pack with the Devil! The climax is our young guitarist going head to head with a heavy metal guitarist in a contest with their very souls at stake.
The only fault with this film is the distraction of the young girl they hitch up with whilst "hobo-ing" in the deep south. Nice enough looking bit of fluff, but does nothing for the film.
Ralph Macchio plays the young blues obsessed kid from New York. Like in the Karate kid, his strength as an actor is that he comes across as young and naïve and that is perfect for this role. He ALMOST looks like he is playing the guitar at times. Ry Cooder made the real sounds.
The rock guitarist in the duel at the end is played by Steve Vai who comes across as a demonic axe man.
I have no idea why this is not available in the UK, but I had to get this via Amazon Market place, from a stockist in the US. I can't help thinking that a trashy Britney Spears film with the same name may have helped keep this of our shelves.
If you like rock or blues guitar music or just enjoy buddy/road movies, watch this film.
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on 2 October 2003
A young classical guitar student, (Ralph Macchio), with a passion for blues guitar, sets off in search of a 'lost song' by the late, great, Robert Johnson. He is aided and abetted by a convicted felon, (Joe Seneca), who exploits the young musician and elicits his help to escape from a secure hospital. The journey of discovery begins.........for all concerned !! Some wonderful classical, blues and rock guitar from Stevie Vie and Ry Cooder.
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on 17 November 2004
First saw this film YEARS ago on satellite TV and have tried to get a copy ever since. Finally, the studio's decided to release it on DVD... buy it, it's a CLASSIC!
Anyone who's even remotely interested in the blues genre will love this film. There's loads of references any blues anorak will spot, and it's worth buying for the guitar/harmonica sequences alone. Buy it, buy it, BUY IT!!!!
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 January 2005
With great music and a sense of fun, Crossroads is a highly entertaining romp and certainly not the usual Hollywood fare. If you have a love of rock or the blues, then you owe it to yourself to check this out. The simple tale of a classical guitar prodigy (Macchio) whose real love is the blues, on a quest to find Robert Johnson's lost song, is a simple one. But it's well executed and Macchio's guide, a bluesman with hell hounds on his trail (Seneca), is a sterling performance. But it's the music that truly shines and a turn by Steve Vai proves that the Devil really does have all the best tunes. Well, he would if he could just reach that really high note at the end. Twenty-four fret neck next time, Mr Vai?
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on 25 September 2004
Being a fan of Ry Cooder I loved the music from the film. So much so I had have the music CD ('Crossroads' -suprise, suprise) The 'guitar battle' at the end of the film is not on the music CD from Ry Cooder. The second guitar is Steve Vai. The guitar duel can be found on Vai's album 'The Elusive Light & Sound Vol.1'. All good stuff. Films not bad either.
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on 14 June 2007
Steve Vai played both sides of the guitar duel, while acting as Jack Butler, the devil's guitarist. Ry Cooder recorded the slide parts and produced the soundtrack.

"Eugene's Trick Bag", the updated classical piece at the climax of the film, is largely based on Niccolo Paganini's Caprice #5. Paganini, as the pervading myth has it, sold his soul to the devil for his musical skills. Steve Vai, as 'Jack Butler', replicates Paganini's legendary rolling eyes, long unkempt hair and gaunt stature.

Though the blues guitar sounds aren't truly coming from Ralph Macchio's fingers, the actor is actually playing note for note the music of Steve Vai and Ry Cooder. His fingering, slides and bends are precise until the "main" solo, which incorporates Paganini's 5th Caprice, in which it is obvious he is not fingering the correct location on the guitar, as well with the patterns, this can be seen since he uses mainly the same pattern (scale on the top frets, then another one in the bottom frets) and all the scale portion of it, the scales are shifting and changing sound, but his patterns remain the same.

The Fender Telecaster Ralph Macchio carries along his hobo trek in the second half of the film is a 1970s CBS Fender with block lettering on the headstock. Very realistic for the film because not only were they affordable and easy to acquire (in the 1980s, that is), their heavy polyurethane finish made them near impervious to the tests of the road, as seen when Macchio and Seneca are walking through the rain, sleeping in barns, abandoned shacks and the outdoors. You could take a CBS Telecaster covered with snow, plug it in and it would play perfectly.
11 comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 September 2003
Calling all guitarists, forget the banjo scene from The Deliverance this films climax will blow you away. The enjoyment of this film is enhanced if you do play guitar yourself but the film is enjoyable to watch none the less if you don't. Ralph Machio of Karate Kid fame plays the lightening boy, a classically trained guitarist who has a burning ambition to play the blues. He rescues an old blues player from an old folks home and embarks on a journey to discover a long lost legendary blues song. On the road its tough and he has to learn the ways of the old blues man fast. Playing guitar to earn money is hard for a white boy in the deep south. They meet a girl and there is a fleeting slushy love story, but all this aside we are building up for the finally when Lightening boy has to Cut Teeth with the devil to win back his friends soul. What every guitarists wet dreams are made of. I guarantee that the end of this tape will wear out before the beginning. Enjoy.
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on 2 July 2015
Fantastic film! Good storyline, great characterisation, passionate acting, non-stop action and fabulous music. A worthwhile and enjoyable film for everyone although it helps if you like guitar music - classical, blues and rock.

5 star + with a bullet!
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on 21 March 2005
.
I've waited for this film to come onto DVD for years. This is a good little road movie which teams up a young classical guitarist, who has an obsession with blues music and in particular Robert Johnsons missing song, with an 80 year old blues harmonica player, Willy Brown, held in a geriatric detention centre in New York. The kid breaks the old man out on the condition that they travel South to discover the missing song. Along the way the old mans terrible secret is let out - he made a pack with the Devil! The climax is our young guitarist going head to head with a heavy metal guitarist in a contest with their very souls at stake.
The only fault with this film is the distraction of the young girl they hitch up with whilst "hobo-ing" in the deep south. Nice enough looking bit of fluff, but does nothing for the film.
Ralph Macchio plays the young blues obsessed kid from New York. Like in the Karate kid, his strength as an actor is that he comes across as young and naïve and that is perfect for this role. He ALMOST looks like he is playing the guitar at times. Ry Cooder made the real sounds.
The rock guitarist in the duel at the end is played by Steve Vai who comes across as a demonic axe man.
I have no idea why this is not available in the UK, but I had to get this via Amazon Market place, from a stockist in the US. I can't help thinking that a trashy Britney Spears film with the same name may have helped keep this of our shelves.
If you like rock or blues guitar music or just enjoy buddy/road movies, watch this film.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 October 2013
Is unfortunate that the actors are not at the height of the movie. the story is excellent and the music too. Acting a bit less but, luckily enough, is not diminishing the pleasure of the film itself.
Enjoyable and relaxing, great music and good story.
Worth the watching and listening, indeed. Surely a film to have in the collection.
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