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on 17 April 2017
I saw a few reviews which suggested this book wasn't worth it, and that it was somehow less than Steve's other similar books. They're wrong.

This brings everything together.

It's an easy reading and yet tough digesting final nudge to getting yourself out there. If The War on Art is for those discovering they're about to change, this is for those ready to do it. The War on Art is about climbing up the ladder of a diving tower, whereas this is about standing tip-toe on the edge. It can't make you jump, but it's the closest thing to an understanding voice of encouragement. It's the wise words of someone who has clearly been through the struggle of creative self-doubt, and that makes those words more powerful.

When I think about the money I waste on a daily basis, it's crazy to think that the only reasons I sometimes skip buying a book, are a few lame reviews, and the following thought that it'll be a waste of money. This book is well worth the money, and the time invested is minimal (give yourself 2 to 3 hours max, e.g. a train or plane journey). For a few coins and a few hours, you get potentially many more dollars, pounds or euros more value in return. You'll also save perhaps thousands of life hours.

On the day I finished reading this book, I took a trip on the London Underground. At the station, someone had written a quote on a notice board. By uncanny coincidence, it seems to sum up what it's about. I took a picture of it, and it's linked to this review.

Oh, and before I go, thanks Steve. This is a generous bit of your heart.
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on 15 August 2017
I've read a lot of personal development books. This one takes quite an interesting approach. The chapters are short and sharp and you can easily revert back to them for reference and for a bit of inspiration if you ever become stuck for some inspiration.

I gave 4 stars because a few of the chapters didn't make sense to me and I had no idea what the author was trying to get at. But that's just me.
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on 21 November 2016
Will pull you from the depths of laziness and procrastination into the realm of getting things done - it is a life saving book... seriously buy it.
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on 7 November 2016
Inspiring and instructive read on how to deal with Resistance and face the fears we all have. It is such an insightful book that one needs to read and re-read. The most important thing, though, is to take action and apply the learning.
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on 11 August 2017
A good read from Steven, with the biggest takeaway being a very simply labelled change in mindset that is most certainly not an overnight event for most, but vital for us all.
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on 11 August 2016
Great book!
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on 18 May 2017
Read ALL his books NOW!
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on 2 March 2013
Pressfield's other book The War of Art changed my life. I refer to it regularly when I'm struggling against 'Resistance'. Then came Do the Work, which is one of the weakest books I've read in any genre. Turning Pro falls in between those two. If you haven't read War of Art there might be some inspiration in here, but Turning Pro lacks clarity of message and seems to be a cheap attempt to capitalize on the loyal following for War of Art.

I bought this book because of the apparently-new concepts of shadow careers and displacement activities. However, they are only described in passing and I can give you a more explicit and helpful description here: we pursue a shadow career when we sit on the sidelines of our passion (e.g. professor of creative writing instead of a novelist). Displacement activities are things which replace and displace doing our Work (e.g. blogging or reading a good book on writing instead of *actually* writing your novel; writing a review on Amazon...... etc.).

If you don't own War of Art, absolutely buy that book. If you own War of Art, read it again, or better yet, sit down and do your Work.
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on 17 June 2012
This book is a serious challenge for any creative who wants to be considered a professional in their chosen sphere. Pressfield holds nothing back and this book seriously kicked my ass. He takes the excuses we all wheel out sometimes and blows them to pieces while telling of his own past, giving emotional resonance to some difficult life lessons. The book underscores the fact that turning pro is not for everyone, that there is considerable sacrifice. I was personally convicted on my habits and how distraction can sometimes ruin my creative time. Taking action on this book is difficult but necessary, and I start today. Highly recommended.
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on 19 July 2012
'Turning Pro' is a good book with good ideas but he already covered them in his previous one, 'The War of Art' which, in my opinion, is much better.
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