Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Learn more Shop now Learn more



on 8 October 2017
It is well written often with very telling descriptions - for example of the Berlin Olympics of 1936 which Bartmann watched on television (there were special tv centres) because tickets were too expensive.

Here is a youth from a humble background as a baker attracted by the glamour of an elite army formation. Tall and with Aryan good looks, he was accepted for training and was delighted to escape from his humdrum job.

I was fascinated by his army training because I was able to compare this with my own British army training in the 1950s. He was involved in the attack on Russia, ultimately leading to disillusion as the Russian winter exposed the weaknesses of army logistics, particularly the lack of winter clothing, though his loyalty to Hitler held was not in question, nor was his faith in victory.

Recuperating from wounds, in Berlin, he witnessed the devastation of the capital, but at this stage he still believed that Germany could avoid defeat. He was given the job of training 16 and 17 year old boys for defensive roles. Later, with his raw recruits in defensive positions, he realised for the first time that defeat was not only likely but inevitable.

Bartmann became a prisoner of war, first with the Americans, then the British, ending up in Edinburgh where after his release he resumed life as a baker.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 14 October 2016
A truly eye opening account of the 2nd World War from the perspective of one of Hitler's most elite formations, the Leibstandarte were the 1st armed branch of the SS formed in 1933 from Germany's best soldiers.
Edwin Bergmann is not the stereotypical fanatical killer that the SS have been portrayed as but actually quite a gentle soul in a hideous environment so this book is not all blood gore whores and bad language but a very heartfelt look at the war by a man who was merely doing what he thought was best for his Country & his people.
There is no denying some of the worst atrocities committed by Germany during WW2 was at the hands of the SS, particularly the Leibstandarte but not every member of an organisation can be evil and this author proves that point, or is he just lying to cover up his own unspeakable deeds ?
Read it and decide.
Excellent 1st hand account of life serving under Hitler.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 June 2017
A very readable account of Mr Bartmann's service during WW2 in Russia and elsewhere. He covers the early years of his life, a fascinating historical account, and also what happened to him afterwards. He did not appear to be a fervant Nazi, but wished to serve his country which he did with honour. After the war he became a British Citizen and lived in Scotland, continuing his trade as a baker.
Well worth reading.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 26 January 2014
Erwin Bartmann account of his war was absolutely top draw !!! i can highly recommend this book indeed a must must
read for all ww2 buffs.
0Comment| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 3 March 2017
Tremendous read. Well-written, heartfelt, honest. Uncluttered by apology, political context or unconvincing tactical passages, we are given a young soldier's account of war experienced in a vacuum. His Regiment and comrades are what interested him. Interestingly, we are given details of capture, post war experiences in captivity and images of civilians caught up in the turmoil of defeat. A superb memoir.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 January 2018
A great book that shows that most Waffen SS soldiers were not fanatical Nazi murderers as some people would like to portray them as. Also dispels the myth that you had to be a member of the Nazi Party to join . For anyone who is interested in the Eastern Front, this book will be hard to put down!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 2 June 2017
Finally some balanced view on historical events that the winners always distort to their own gain. It makes us remember how much tougher people were in those days. Honest and direct with a very human side to it. How all sides committed crimes of hideous proportions
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 January 2018
I have read of few books written by serving troops. This I found better than most as much of the storyline is based in the USSR, the east front. Nice to know he ended up a Scot.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 7 May 2017
It has the ring of truth about it, obviously from the perspective of a lowly private. Similar to Sajer, altho less graphic detail. An antidote to ideas of Nazi superiority, efficiency etc, to some extent.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 21 September 2017
I was captivated by this book, and got a new perspective on life under the Nazis. It's worth a read if you're studying this time period.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)