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4.2 out of 5 stars
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4.2 out of 5 stars
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on 20 June 2017
Very useful
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Everything you need to know (and a lot you don't) to take to the roads on two wheels, where you'll either enjoy the freedom of the wind in your hair - providing you cast aside the helmet - and/or become a menace to other road users.

I'm not an avid cyclist - in fact I don't cycle at all now simply because I find the roads (and many motorists) in the UK too dangerous for this activity - but I used to cycle a lot when I lived abroad, where admittedly, the roads are wider and (more importantly) flatter. That being said when I was invited to read and review the Bluffer's Guide, this was the one I chose. It is obviously written by someone who knows his stuff - it is hugely entertaining, full of interesting snippets about the history of cycles and cycling, what to wear, what to discuss when in the company of cyclist and non-cyclist alike. I particularly like this......"The standard reproof from motorists masking their guilt about taking half an hour to drive a mile to work: cyclists are smug. Not true: we cyclists are simply pleased with ourselves, because we're clearly superior to everyone else"

One word of advice.....do not read this whilst cycling, you'll fall off, laughing.

Great gift - for motorists with a sense of humour, and cyclists of course.
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If you have ever wondered what it is like, getting sweaty around the groin area and suffering anal pain, then this is the book for you, as this latest addition to the Bluffers series recounts the history and life experiences of having a small seat nestling between your nether regions.
Despite its limited size, the book is packed to bursting with facts and stories about cycling. Written in a light-hearted style, it comes complete with all the additional bits, bolts and bobs that the layman needs to know, such as what to wear on the road and what light to affix to your chariot, if wishing to pass as a grade A bluffer.
In this book you will read of the perils of cycling, apart from the afore mentioned sweaty groin, with black marks reserved for pedestrians, motorists and even cycle path city planners.
For those of a more studious nature, the book contains a brief and witty history of cycling and cycling luminaries, from the grandiose sounding Baron Karl von Drais, through to London Mayor Boris Johnson and modern day Modster, Sir Bradley Wiggins. One thing is for certain, after this the reader will be able to sound off about brakes, gears and pumps to any person in the land without appearing a complete cycling novice. I just have one complaint; just how does one escape sweaty groin syndrome?
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on 3 March 2014
This is the first book I've read from the Bluffer's Guide series and I thoroughly enjoyed it. While the book continually comes across with a wry, self-deprecating sense of humour, it is abundantly clear that it has been written by someone with a true passion for cycling. Throughout it laughs at the quirky idiosyncrasies of cycling in Britain, while at the same time offering some insightful and thought provoking commentaries about the state of the UK's cycling provisions. From commuting in London on a Boris bike to faceplanting off your fully-load full-suss in the Welsh valleys, this has it all covered. So whether you are seasoned rider or a genuine novice desperate to impress, read this now.
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on 11 November 2013
Informative, with useful facts and statistics to rile (and flatten) the petrol-heads you meet, as well as the ignorant man (and woman) in the street. Quite funny and had me chuckling as I read it in one go the day I received it.
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on 2 March 2014
Good read very enjoyable, quirky and funny in places had me chuckling out loud more than once, liked the peculiar helmet law in Spain!! very odd.
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on 25 June 2014
Although short, a very amusing and entertaining book. Enjoyed reading while on holiday and found myself laughing out loud on a number of occasions! You probably need to know at least basics of cycling.
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on 17 October 2013
This was a present from my daughter as I've taken up more serious cycling in later life and had a lot to learn to be able to hold a sensible conversation with other more experienced cyclists. This little gem of a book did the job perfectly! Very readable style but crammed with useful information and funny too.
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on 25 June 2014
Get the lycra out - this little book will allow you to bluff your way into Bradley Wiggins's circles, well, maybe that's an exaggeration but it will certainly demystify a lot of the jargon and pretensions associated with the cycling world. Great snippets of information such as winners of the tour de France tend to be fighters rather than pure speedsters due to the extreme climbs (so there is hope for me yet) and that helmet use in London tends to be so people can fix cameras to them to use in evidence later.
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on 8 May 2014
Never has a book about bluffing been so true,enjoyable read and informative to boot.If your serious about cycling find another book ha ha.
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