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on 26 February 2017
Wow, Id heard that this was a very 'Honest' book...and considering it was the story of a man I blamed for the Death of Classic Who...I wasnt expecting much more than anger. but in fact its eye opening and tells the story of a time and place, a mindset that no longer exists.

I honestly was disturbed by some large chunks, the predatory behaviors and the frankly stupid access given to 'Barkers'...that truly bit the hand that feeds...but it was all brought on by vanity...and a misplaced sense of trust.

By the end I was in tears, I wanted to rewatch this era, I wanted to shake the man...but most of all I wanted to meet him!...yeah.....thats an achievement!
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on 11 January 2016
A really good read. Very well researched and incredibly detailed. An honest account with lots of great stories.
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on 10 April 2015
A wonderful read - for someone on the periphery of organised fandom in the 80s this summoned up such nostalgia. JNT's life & work are handled sensitively, brutally honestly and with great affection. Treat yourself, you won't regret it!
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on 12 February 2017
fine for the hardcore fan but book drags a bit, could do with tightening up in the editing
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on 1 November 2015
Read this from cover-to-cover in next to no time. An insightful, well written book.
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on 28 June 2013
Pleased that this was not merely a mix of scandal and Doctor Who regurgitated information. A lot of the Doctor Who stuff was told from a new slant and I couldn't help thinking JNT was his own enemy though not his WORST enemy. Also felt he was maligned and a fair part of criticism of his Who tenure can be heavily shared with the script editors as can the good stuff,
I was interested in his life before and after Doctor Who and it was sad he ended up as he did. I was interested to hear what went on at the BBC - breaking up TV Centre has its pluses I think, too cosy by half - but not shocked particularly.
A well put together biography which will probably be judged by it's OTT title for good or ill in much the same way it's subject was judged by the public image he projected - for good or ill.
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on 22 February 2016
Arrived in good condition
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on 24 September 2013
Firstly, a brilliant book. I suppose, from everything fans learnt and heard about JNT during his tenure, not much came as a complete surprise. But what did strike a cord was probably the more human side of the man we loved to hate; looking after sick parents etc.

Yes, there were a lot of revelations and incidents that might shock or just turn the stomach of fans, but it does become much clearer of how much an influence Gary Downie was. In retrospect, Downie comes off as a rather malign influence at that.

If you've not read it yet I would recommend this as one of the essential reads of behind the scenes 80's WHO.
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on 12 October 2015
This was one of the best books I've read for re-creating the culture at the BBC and for showing a different and more human story of what was going on behind-the-scenes. I recommend reading this book with 'Script Doctor' by Andrew Cartmel to give more information on the Sylvester McCoy era of Doctor Who and other behind-the-scenes stories.

As already stated this isn't really about Doctor Who, it is about the life of a BBC producer and it is very interesting.

Richard Marson has produced a really good journalistic investigation and gained interviews with people that we haven't really heard from in public before - Jonathan Powell and J N-T's colleagues in the Drama Department.

Marson has also written from the perspective of a media professional, so we get more of an insight into the politics of the BBC of the time. I think this book gives us some of the most detailed accounts from BBC Executives of why the series was cancelled, brought back and finally cancelled again.

J N-T's life is very interesting and I guess in any biography there will be personal stuff going on that the said individual wouldn't choose to include in their autobiography. Marson has put together a very honest and detailed portrait and it is for others - who knew J N-T - to judge if it is fair. The writer does in fact put this point to friends and gets their answers.

One of the best media biographies I've read and up there with Steve Rider's 'My Chequered Career' and Will Wyatt's 'Life in the Fun Factory' - both of which have similar levels of behind-the-scenes details of the world of TV production from the 80s and 90s.
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on 13 June 2013
I have to say I found this book unputdownable and read the whole thing in one sitting. I dont often read biographies, but the rise and fall of such a larger than life person was a riveting read that has in stages had me, laughing (at the absurd things he got up to), pained (at the awful judgement he showed at times), saddened (at the way he seems to have alientated people he cared for), appalled (at the terrible way the BBC treated him), and crying (at the sad and premature way his life ended)in turn.

A book well worth a read.
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