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on 10 January 2006
If you're thinking of spending any length of time in India, before you buy a copy of the Rough Guide get your hands on a copy of Mick Sheridan's "An Indian Calling". Mick will give you a hilarious insight into the smaller details that most guide books gloss over. Hopefully having digested Mick's book you will be able to avoid the numerous pitfalls that face you at every turn. The first lesson you will learn concerns luggage. Mick and Julie, his patient girlfriend who accompanies him on this adventure get through a lot of luggage, not because they have a suitcase fetish or need to be seen sporting the latest Samsonite range. No, it's all down to the Indian baggage handlers and their inherent brutality with luggage whereby it seems they will do whatever is needed to damage your luggage before you get it back. You've been warned.
This book had me laugh out loud several times on the tube something I might add that doesn't happen too often and in my opinion that makes this book a more than worthwhile read. Mick went to India with Julie to get away from it all but you will discover that this is not as easy as it sounds. Not only will you learn something about India, you'll also get a small insight into "Brits abroad" and the views of a Brit on this matter. The book in parts elaborates on some areas in too much detail for me, I felt like I had received a training session on call centres by the end of it all but this can be forgiven as there are a multitude of funny moments in amongst this all.
All in all a damn good read.
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on 10 January 2006
If you're thinking of spending any length of time in India, before you buy a copy of the Rough Guide get your hands on a copy of Mick Sheridan's "An Indian Calling". Mick will give you a hilarious insight into the smaller details that most guide books gloss over. Hopefully having digested Mick's book you will be able to avoid the numerous pitfalls that face you at every turn. The first lesson you will learn concerns luggage. Mick and Julie, his patient girlfriend who accompanies him on this adventure get through a lot of luggage, not because they have a suitcase fetish or need to be seen sporting the latest Samsonite range. No, it's all down to the Indian baggage handlers and their inherent brutality with luggage whereby it seems they will do whatever is needed to damage your luggage before you get it back. You've been warned.
This book had me laugh out loud several times on the tube something I might add that doesn't happen too often and in my opinion that makes this book a more than worthwhile read. Mick went to India with Julie to get away from it all but you will discover that this is not as easy as it sounds. Not only will you learn something about India, you'll also get a small insight into "Brits abroad" and the views of a Brit on this matter. The book in parts elaborates on some areas in too much detail for me, I felt like I had received a training session on call centres by the end of it all but this can be forgiven as there are a multitude of funny moments in amongst this all.
All in all a damn good read
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on 20 March 2007
Both my wife and I loved this book.

Having spent time in India, in particular in Goa, this bought back SO many memories.The descriptions of the people, the transport, and just life in India are spot on.

Essential reading if you intend going to India as it will give you an idea of what you are letting yourself in for!
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on 11 October 2005
This is a stonking piece of work. Brash, bold and funny as hell. The narrator is a mod, or an ex-mod, trying to escape Market Research in a land he feels he might pull it off. What follows is an excellent acceptance/avoidance of work in the sub-continent, observed and suffered through the author's sometimes self-deprecating eye. Memorable scenes include the arrival of Mr Sherdian senior and the 'Lion King' blessing of the house.
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on 14 October 2005
I read the book while in France and thoroughly enjoyed it. I found it extremely easy to read and very funny, so funny in fact that I found myself laughing out load on more than one occasion. It gave a great account of India and its people and clearly documented how difficult and enjoyable life can be in such a place. I will most certainly be recommending and will go as far to give it a money back guarantee.
Cheers.
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on 8 October 2013
I really enjoyed this book, the chaos and confusion that goes with the beauty of India of course makes for plenty of comic material, but what sets this apart from the usual, light-hearted "Fish Out Of Water", travelogue is the authors conscience & honesty - he's not afraid to admit that he's short-tempered, occasionally intolerant and somewhat set in his ways, but this makes for excellent reading especially in his quest for the "right" sort of car and a bespoke suit, as if Indian tailors are expected to know what a Mod cut is.

The author's long-suffering partner Julie quietly emerges as a real trooper too - all in all a book full of honesty, laugh-out-loud turns of phrase & genuine enthusiasm for India, its flora, fauna and its people.

It made me want to go to Goa - maybe not the 'party' bits, but the surroundings sound fantastic.
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on 7 August 2007
I haven't read it...as the baggage handlers lost it, though I'm sure it's acers, as it appears startlingly accurate.
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