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on 14 August 2013
This book is a witty approach to learning Latin. Not to be taken too seriously, although it can be if you really want to start to study the language
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on 30 May 2013
This is a most enjoyable read, as long as you don't try to learn Latin from it! Most amusing translations.
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on 30 March 2011
This book is an ideal breezy and chatty accompaniment to a traditional grammar primer, and warrants re-reading when your head is spinning with too much of the serious stuff. It's is at its best and most useful when Mount talks about the mnemonics he used at school for learning and memorizing different parts of grammar, like declensions and different verb tenses. He manages to do this in a light-hearted way, and gives you just enough to help you start with a confident stumble into Latin.

The publishers categorize it as 'humour'. Personally, I wasn't struck with the humour: with an obsession with the British royalty, photogenic actresses, wine varieties and nostalgia for grammar-school Classics lessons, it's definitely aimed at a Daily Telegraph-reading audience. But the helpfulness and cheery tone of the passages on grammar made it worth reading.
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on 27 August 2008
An entertaining run through Latin as the language of the classics.

Could have said something about pronunciation: why make it up as the classicists do, or mangle it as the Etonians do, when you can experience it as the beautiful living language of the Church spoken in the Italian style.

A few copy-editing mistakes: translation of the Ave Maria and of Horace (p. 206 - leporem translated as dove rather than hare!).

But otherwise an inspiration to try again with the language of so many ages. Well done, Harry Mount. Who is going to do the same for Greek?
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on 2 November 2013
I loved Latin already and it brought back memories of learning at school but this is also for people who have never studied the language. It is great fun and very interesting.
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on 25 November 2013
Fascinating! It revived my interest in Latin after 50 years since I studied it at school. Highly recommended to the specialist or the general reader.
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on 4 February 2009
A very interesting and amusing recollection of School Latin, with an admixture of Latin we didn't know before.
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on 9 June 2009
Amo,Amas,Amat is a pleasure to read, witty and amusing and, of course, very informative. For anyone interested in language it is a must. I read reviews of the book, and although I didn't do Latin at school, I knew it would be fun to develop the scant Latin I knew and would no doubt increase my vocabulary in English and other European languages. AND, it helps with crosswords too|
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on 1 February 2014
Written for and by someone from a very privileged upbringing, who is also an embittered little Pratt.
A book you could only enjoy if you have no sense of the real world.
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on 15 August 2009
Excellent Book.
Really takes you back to your latin lesssons. It explains things that i didn't understand then!
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