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on 10 January 2018
Not enough about Ian’s early life and up-bringing and I thought there would have been a mention of the Knebworth concert in 1985 but that seemed to have been overlooked or missed out. Ian gave it warts and all about his lack of business acumen and his abortive ventures. Reading between the lines about the bands problems always led in one direction, the direction that most people that know a bit about Deep Purple would guess. A good insight of a rock hero and well worth reading. Now onto Bon, The Last Highway!
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on 16 July 2017
Funny, honest but it ends in 98 which lets it down a little well worth a read though, Ian comes across as a fella you'd enjoy having a beer or ten with.
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on 12 January 2018
Quite interesting .. Didn't think it was a great read .
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on 8 October 2017
good read if you are a fan
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on 29 December 2017
Pretty awful writing, although I enjoyed the section on Gillan the band. Lots of lists of tour dates to pad it out.
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on 9 November 2017
Really good read.couldnt put it down
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VINE VOICEon 3 May 2004
One of the most candid autobiographies I've ever read. This is easy and quite enjoyable reading, with more than one moment I caught myself laughing out loud.
Ian Gillan tells it like it is (the whole truth, but I suspect not all of it, but definitely the good bits) with quite a sense of humour. He makes it crystal clear that Ritchie Blackmore was not the only "difficult one" in the band, and he writes unashamedly about his failed relationships, failed business ventures and failed bands. I respect him for that.
His positive outlook on life wins the day, even though he never markets himself as a survivor. One gets the impression that Ian Gillan is a fun guy to know, and couldn't care less about the millions he's made, and lost over the years.
The books starts where the hero is a toddler, and ends at the start of the "Hell or High Water" Tour, which is a shame, because I would have liked to read about the incident with the glass of water. But a great autobiography, none the less.
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on 9 September 2015
Good condition
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on 7 April 2017
as promised
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on 8 March 2017
This book shows Gillan as a man, not as an icon.
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