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on 6 June 2017
This waas purchased for someone else as a replacement. They are happy with it.
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on 10 November 2001
An exellent book, very well researched and written. The author (nuinn) took years to complete this work and it shows in the depth of information offered. The book is ideal for those with some knowledge of druid history and practice but may confuse the beginner. Contains references to ancient mounds, barrows and circles, photographs, info about the eight druid festivals and ways of celebrating them. No historian or druid should be without this book!
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on 25 January 2010
As an artefact of a bygone era, this makes interesting reading, but please don't take it literally as a portrait of contemporary Druidry. It isn't. The book consists of a compilation of the writings of Philip Ross Nichols, founder of the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids. It was edited together many years after Nichols' death by his successor as chief of the Order, Philip Carr-Gomm. Nichols drew heavily on material from 150 years of previous Druidic revivals as well as his own fascination with folklore, archaeology and comparative religion. Unfortunately, much of his source material was pure invention. Particularly when dealing with history, the results are wildly speculative and hugely misleading. One example is the oft-quoted list of previous chiefs of the Druid Order, few of whom were even Druids, let alone Druid chiefs. The book is also marred by Nichols' writing style, which tends to wander from one subject to another almost at random at times. Read it as a picture of what some Druids believed fifty years ago. There are far better sources for what Druids believe and do now. One of the best is Philip Carr-Gomm's What Do Druids Believe? (What Do We Believe)
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VINE VOICEon 31 October 2002
The Book of Druidry was one of the first mainstream books published on Druidry, and is essentially the posthumously published work of Ross Nichols, former chief of the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids. This book is interesting from a historical perspective, but is most certainly not a Druid's bible, or sourcebook. Many of Nichols' ideas are fairly eccentric, are not supported by current archaeological evidence (Druids coming from Atlantis, or space), and are worked to fit in with his personal Christian ideals.
I'd still recommend this book, as long as one bears in mind that the written word is not a be-all or an end-all. It's not so much about the actual history of the Druids, as about imagining a history to tie in with neo-Druidry. Nichols was a friend of Gerald Gardner, founder of the Wiccan tradition, and in my mind this book basically does for Druidry what Gardner did for modern witchcraft. To be read with a hefty pinch of salt.
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on 24 May 2008
This book contains a good synopsis of the modern Druid tradition as percieved by its author. It contains some good sections on reviewing the ancient sites, numerology - a recommended read with some good scholarly basis.
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on 20 July 2015
Full of invaluable infomation
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