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This was the first Lawrence I ever read and so still reminds me of being 16,reading in the back garden of my parent's home... but even beyond the lovely memories it's still one of my favourites.

Passionate and enthralling, it shows Lawrence's skills at dissecting the relationships that bind men and women, and not just in a sexual sense. This is visceral and emotional, the kind of book that stops you in your tracks and makes you think 'yes, that's how life it'. Wonderful stuff and one of the most autobiographical of Lawrence's novels.
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on 13 June 2017
Love the social history aspects to this novel. Makes you realise how much easier/ comfort able our lives are now.
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on 21 April 2013
Stunning just couldn't switch off and have had to have it ripped out of my hands such was the compulsion to read it.
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on 31 October 2012
Lawrence writes about his own experience of growing up in a coal mining community. He describes well the strained marriage that his parents had, his deep love for his mother and his dislike of his father. The conflicting feelings that he and is girlfriends have towards each other is sensitively done. He is perceptive of what it is like coping with your own identity and dealing with others as teenager.
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VINE VOICEon 9 May 2017
I last read a DH Lawrence at A level and it was The Rainbow. The over analysis and emphasis on symbolism turned me against him and I hadn't picked up another book by him until I was given this old publication for a birthday present.
The volume is slim but it is actually approximately 500 pages, split into 15 chapters. The paper is very thin and the print is also very small.
Just knowing a little of Lawrence's life brings out the semi-autobiographical elements in this novel, although there is also a lot of imagination used.
The writing flows beautifully and it is a joy to read from the first page.
The author is able to describe every detail ranging from the intricate natural world to the emotionally charged domestic violence situations at home.
I found the portrayal of the family to be very special and felt that I had a peek into a world through a window, without ever feeling that I was intruding. Lawrence shows the good, the bad and everything in between - no-one is a hero or a villain all the time and the mix of characteristics makes them all very plausible.
There is no doubt that this is beautiful writing but I found the heavy detail wearing at times and it distracted from the characters in some parts of the book.
I'm really pleased I had the opportunity to read this and liked it but was slightly disappointed that it didn't blow me away
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on 22 May 2011
This is one of those books that I like to re-read every few years, and every time I find something new and wonderful in it. Although inspired by Lawrence's own early experiences, and the chief focus of the novel is the growth of Paul Morel, the viewpoint shifts throughout - so the characters and their relationships are always changing, and are never finally defined. On my most recent reading I was especially moved by the mother, Gertrude, and the sadness of her unfulfilled life.

There are two important deaths in Sons and Lovers: Lawrence writes them starkly and simply and without sentiment. And he shows how grief can almost kill a person.

The setting of the novel is the Nottinghamshire mining village where Lawrence grew up, and you will never read a truer or more vivid account of early 20th century working class life, anywhere.

This Penguin edition of Sons and Lovers has an excellent introduction by Blake Morrison, with some really interesting insights into the drafting and editing, including the input of Jessie Chambers (Miriam in the novel), Lawrence's wife Frieda and editor Edward Garnett.
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This is one of very few English classics, and the only novel I have read describing lives of poverty, that I haven't liked.

Although I felt pity for most of the characters, the book failed to make me like any of them, or even to care much about them.

The details of life in a mining family, while no doubt autobiographically accurate, were (for me) pedantic, dull and not even written in good quality prose.

If you want to read about the working class of a few generations ago I recommend How Green Was My Valley, No Mean City, and The Road to Nab End. They are insightful, shocking, and interesting to read.
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on 18 July 2014
Having never read Lawrence before it did not take me long to I realise I hadn't missed anything
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on 10 May 2015
I wanted to read this book because it is allegedly a 'classic', but with more than half still to read I find it rather a bore.
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This was the first Lawrence I ever read and so still reminds me of being 16,reading in the back garden of my parent's home... but even beyond the lovely memories it's still one of my favourites.

Passionate and enthralling, it shows Lawrence's skills at dissecting the relationships that bind men and women, and not just in a sexual sense. This is visceral and emotional, the kind of book that stops you in your tracks and makes you think 'yes, that's how life it'. Wonderful stuff and one of the most autobiographical of Lawrence's novels.
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