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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 7 July 2013
There can be no doubt as to why this novel has been chosen to be part of this series of re-releases to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary; it is the ideal representation of the Third Doctor's era. Set in a very English East Anglian village where the Master is conspiring with a race of aliens to infiltrate and invade the planet, this story has all the hallmarks of many of the televised UNIT stories from this period. From the construction of the plot and the flow and pace of events it is easy enough to imagine that this might have been a novelisation of a four or six part serial under the helm of Barry Letts.

The Third Doctor's characterisation, which I often believe misses the mark in many Doctor Who novels, is absolutely spot on here. There is also a particularly accurate portrayal of Jo Grant in which you can hear Katy Mannning delivering the lines. Even though they have somewhat smaller roles to play, it is also clear that the author is well versed in the behaviour and mannerisms of The Brigadier, Yates and Benton. The UNIT team shines here as it does in the very best of its television appearances.

This is also Roger Delgado's Master to a tee. Supercilious charm and malicious menace are delivered with equal smoothness. His bickering, mutually untrusting, alliance with Bliss (although similar to all the Master's alliances and thus not particularly original) is perfectly in character and utterly enjoyable. As parasitic, body snatching aliens the Gaderene aren't the most original or unique of science fiction species but there is enough to them to function more than effectively within the confines of this story and alongside the Master.

I'm not often taken with Mark Gatiss' offerings for the television series (apart from the recent `Crimson Horror'), usually finding his Doctor Who novels to be the better stories. That is certainly the case with `Last of the Gaderene'. In another dimension this could have easily been a televised Third Doctor story. As such there couldn't be a better novel to represent Pertwee's incarnation of The Doctor for the fiftieth anniversary.
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 12 May 2013
This is the 50th anniversary story representing the Third Doctor, as played by Jon Pertwee - the dashing, debonair man of action with all his gadgets, Scientific Advisor to UNIT, and Timelord initially exiled to Earth. Initially published in 2000, it is set prior to the TV story The Green Death, where Jo leaves to get married. So Jo features in this story along with the Doctor and UNIT. The original book cover features the Doctor's face, along with a plane from WWII (I guess it's a Spitfire, as this is a feature of the story, but stand to be corrected). As the Third Doctor stories often were, this one is Earth-bound, but that's what you really expect from a Third Doctor story, and that's what is so reassuring about the Third Doctor as a whole. All those great UNIT stories, with the Brigadier, Seargent Benton, Roger Delgado as the Master, various monsters set to conquer or destroy Earth, and great gadgets - ah, those were the days. This novel has many of those elements, and even has a Government bureaucrat, who so often turned up in UNIT stories, causing trouble, or blocking the Doctor's good intentions.

Set in the early 1970s, there is plenty of nostalgia in this story. The Doctor, starting to get itchy feet with his life on Earth, agrees to go to Culverton when the Brigadier is contacted by a friend who flew in the RAF in WWII, concerned about mysterious goings-on in the village. This is a great story, and a great Third Doctor story. The key to good Doctor Who novels, I thought as I read this, is that the author absolutely must get the characterisation of the appropriate Doctor just right - if that's not done, then it just doesn't scan as a Doctor Who story at all. This story has the Third Doctor down perfectly. And the story is absolutely one that is a Third Doctor story - you can just see it rolling past you on the tv screen as you read.

Absolutely totally recommended as a Doctor Who, Third Doctor, and great story.
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on 10 August 2017
I really enjoyed this 4th Doctor anniversary. It's Avery easy and engaging read. Absolutely typical and consistent with the Jon Pertwee Doctor. The plot felt very familiar... but in a good way. A lovely surprise mid-way through further increased enjoyment. Read it in about 2 days on holiday. Highly recommended!
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on 11 January 2016
Another great Dr Who audio cd, it's 8 hour / 8 cd long well worth the money.
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on 22 July 2015
Excellent third Dr outing by Mark Gattis which takes you back to when Jon Petwee was the doctor as if was an unmade story for TV.
Read by Richard Franklin this is a very classic type story with all the ingredients of a 3rd Dr tale of the time.
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on 12 June 2017
Brilliant classical story captures Jon Pertwees Doctor perfectly
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on 5 February 2018
I Love it :)
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on 12 April 2013
This had all the ingredients of Jon Pertwees doctor who period and it was like being taken back to 1973 again. If Jon was your doctor you will love it and if not you will enjoy it anyway. Gatiss does a great job as usual.
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on 8 June 2015
good story
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on 14 January 2015
Mark Gatiss has wrote a really good book that reminds me so much of Jon Pertwee's Doctor Who, I read this very quickly.
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