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4.4 out of 5 stars
178
4.4 out of 5 stars
Format: Hardcover|Change
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on 4 July 2016
Lovely and easy recipes for daily cooking. It makes a great gift as well.
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on 24 January 2016
Great recipes
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on 22 March 2017
What a delight this book is, with colourful recipes just begging you to try them. Can't wait taste everything soon.
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on 8 May 2017
Excellent, easy to follow delicious recipes, want to make them all. Highly recommend. How to have fun with vegetables and spices.
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VINE VOICEon 16 April 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
We have a couple of other books by Anjum and my wife uses them both frequently as she always finds the recipes themselves very straightforward and easy to follow and just about every dish she has made has been delicious,so she was looking forward to this one and was not disappointed.So far,from this book,she has tried the Savoury yogurt kebabs with basil chutney,which were a really tasty starter,and the Black-eyed bean and coconut curry,which I confess I was slightly dubious about until we tried and very much enjoyed it for a light lunch one day.She has already highlighted several other recipes that she intends to try and it looks like this book will be as essential in our kitchen as the other two.One note of caution;I think that unless you are a vegetarian many if not most of the dishes here are more suitable as lunches,starters or side dishes rather than as hearty meals,although there are several curries that would suit an evening meal.If you're already a fan of Anjum this is highly recommended as she says in the foreword that she has enjoyed writing this book more than any other,because she has tried lots of new foods and flavour combinations.And,of course,it's a great one for vegetarians looking for something a bit different.
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VINE VOICEon 5 March 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I have another of Anjum's books on my shelf, Indian Food Made Easy. Some Indian food books can be very daunting. There are ingredients and cooking methods that are not that available to some of us in the sticks. I remember a friend of mine trying to cook a balti a few years ago. He had a recipe to blindly work through but had never tasted one. So in the end he didn't have a clue what to aim at. This is always important when trying out anything new. Luckily a lot of the recipes in Vegetarian Food come across much simpler. Not all of the dishes are Indian but they do have a slant in that direction.

Some of the dishes in here are one course. Some of them single items such as some great side dishes and rice/grain dishes. These can be mixed and matched with whatever else you are cooking or even a sneaky takeaway. The breakfast and brunch section is a real winner if you fancy something a little spicy to start the day with. This book is a thing of beauty and some of the recipes are perfect to put into non-Indian meals. A number of them can even be considered fast food. The crispy chickpea pancakes and PLT (paneer, lettuce, tomato) are a great example of that.

For vegetarians and carnivores there is plenty to get stuck into, enjoy.
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on 21 March 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I get my Amazon orders delivered to me at work, and having flicked through this one lunchtime, just had to stop at the greengrocer's on the way home to pick up supplies!

I'd dived straight into the "Glorious vegetables" section you see, and it did live up to it's name with dishes such as smoky spiced aubergines and autumnal squash, butterbean and mushroom cobbler, which was very warming and filling on a bleak late winter day. If you're thinking a cobbler (and later, a meat free shepherd's pie) aren't typically "Indian" then you're probably right, but given how we've taken chicken tikka masala (another non-authentic dish) and balti to our British hearts, why shouldn't the cultural traditions flow the other way too and be given their own twist?

My favourite recipes in the book involve paneer or halloumi, with the "PLT" sandwich, spice crusted halloumi with fig and pistachio chutney and grilled paneer and mango salad with ginger dressing added to my repertoire.

The book is unfussy, with beautiful photography, clear layout and instructions, and generally nice and short ingredients lists. Anand isn't afraid to take short cuts and use frozen veg if necessary to get good food on the table fast.

The only disappointment was the breakfast/brunch section - this was distinctly unappealing. And a fair number of recipes use peanuts, which if you're allergic like me may be an issue. I can luckily substitute other nuts, but no alternatives are given.
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Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
As a vegetarian curry-lover, I was looking forward to knocking-up some tasty dishes like wot you get down The Bengal Lancer.
Yeah, I KNOW the Anglo-Bangladeshi offerings down the High Street don't reflect traditional Indian cuisine, but then I'm not sure this book does either...

From Blackberry Compote and Granola to Scotch Quail's Eggs. And how Indian is Halloumi with Fig and Pistachio Chutney?

Many recipes are poncified twaddle imo. -Oh, sorry.. I meant to say "adapted to bring them bang up to date".
And the book's interspersed with photo's of Anjum in colourful jumpers.
Well, I don't want fashion, I want CURRY! Or COOORY (as they say in Birmingham).

I think this would suit more adventurous or experienced cooks than me who are bored with the well-known British Curry staples.

Personally, I could murder a Balti right now.
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[My ref: Glossy Glam Pomegranite Souffle 'Indian Vegetarian Feast' -Really? May 2013]
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VINE VOICEon 25 February 2013
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This is a beautifully presented book, from the scrumptious photographs to the font's ligatures (currently trendy) that add an elegance to the text; it's one of those cookery books that are a joy just to sit and leaf through. These are serious recipes though, of the type that require some time, effort and a few special ingredients and that deserve to be served up as part of a feast.

The book is divided into 9 main sections: Breakfast & brunch; Drinks; Starters & snacks; Salads & grills; Glorious vegetables; Cheese, pulses & eggs; Gorgeous grains; On the side; Divine desserts and also includes a single page introduction, and a page on the "Indian pantry".

Most of the recipes in this collection have their "feet firmly planted in India's amazing regional food" but there are some that are "hanging by a home-spun cotton thread to an Indian heritage" - many in the breakfast section seem to fall into this category. There are British influences too, and dishes such as the Mile-high chickpea burgers, or the Autumnal squash, butterbean and mushroom cobbler inhabit this tasty middle ground. Curry's feature: the Creamy pistachio and the Black-eyed bean and coconut sound particularly good. More unusual recipes are those like the Mumbai street food Juhu Beach pau bhaji, a "divine, buttery Indian vegetable mash with a thick spongy bread crisped up in butter" ... just writing that makes my mouth water! Anjum also includes lots of little extra recipes for making different kinds of raita and chutney and is really helpful in suggesting what else to serve along with the main dish; this is handy for those not familiar with serving Indian food.

Each recipe is introduced with a note on its origins plus useful hints and tips, and the vast majority are accompanied with full page photos. The instructions and list of ingredients are clear and concise and the recipes are easy to follow; I also like the fact that Anjum is so precise in her measuring of ginger (in grams or teaspoons).

Perhaps the only thing to be wary of when buying this book is that if you're new to Indian cooking, you may need to stock up on a few special ingredients. Most of these recipes are also a bit more "involved" than I'm used to, and therefore need a bit more planning; this means they're better made when you have a bit of time on your hands. Overall, this is a lovely-looking book with a rich variety of vegetarian dishes that is guaranteed to spice up your dining.
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Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Anjum's Indian Vegetarian Feast isn't the first book to show how good Indian style cuisine can be for vegetarians, I remember Madhur Jaffrey doing something similar years ago with her Eastern Vegetarian Cooking BBC series, and it's a rich subject since Asian food makes such good use of non-meat ingredients like rice, pulses and spice. However, this book isn't meant to be a definitive collection of authentic Indian cookery, it's really an East/West fusion of Indian and vegetarian cuisine. I know a lot more about vegetarian cookery than Indian cookery and maybe that makes me an ideal reader for the book, which makes the Indian dishes simple and accessible while also giving some familiar vegetarian staples a spicy Indian-style makeover. You will need a well-stocked spice rack but there's a useful shopping list in the book's introduction, which will also help you stock your larder with the requisite grains, pulses and nuts you might need. Few of the ingredients are particularly expensive and of course a small amount of spice goes a long way, so once you've done the shopping it's a relatively inexpensive way to eat too.

The chapter headings are maybe a bit idiosyncratic -- Breakfast & Brunch, Drinks, Starters & Snacks, Salads & Grills, Glorious Vegetables, Cheese, Pulse & Eggs, Gorgeous Grains, On the Side and Divine Deserts -- but it all works and is very nicely presented with lots of photos. Not every dish is illustrated but there's enough to give you the idea, after all one pot of curry can look much like the next, and when there are special techniques required these are illustrated step-by-step too. It isn't a travelogue style of cookbook either, with just brief introductions to each section, so you get lots of recipes to try. Altogether this is just a lovely vegetarian cookbook, especially if you're not already that familiar with Indian cookery, because it reinvents familiar vegetarian ingredients and recipes in a tempting Indian style as well as introducing some new dishes and drinks for your repertoire - if you ever thought vegetarian food was bland then this is the book for you.
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