Learn more Download now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Moana - Listen with Prime Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5
4.4 out of 5 stars

on 26 October 2010
As you would expect from the combination of a Stuart Reid text and Gerry Embleton artwork, this is a good Osprey title. Reid keeps, mostly, to describing the uniforms and insignia while Embleton's paintings are lovely. Only issue for me is that I would have much prefered an Osprey for each of Frederick's allies!.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 24 September 2010
This latest Osprey fills the final MAJOR gap in their coverage of the Seven Years War in Europe - a treatment of His Britannic Majesty's Army which guarded Frederick's Western flank. For a single volume, it covers a great deal of ground, examining the organistaion and uniforms of the contingents from Hanover and the smaller German states, from the opening debacle of Hastenbeck to the end of the war. Stuart Reid even finds enough space to outline the uniforms of the British forces involved (both the initial small force which fought at Minden, and the subsequent "Glorious Rienforcement"), as well as the small contingent of Prussian cavalry Frederick managed to spare for service in the west. With both of the latter already extensively covered by Osprey (the British by Mr Reid himself), it could be argued that neither needed to be here, though their inclusion does make for a more complete package for the uninitiated.

The colour plates by Embleton father and son are (as one would expect) excellent in execution. I've always had a great affection for Gerry Emblton's work as, in a point made elsewhere, he always manages to combine the level of detail in depicting the uniforms that forms one of the main reasons for the existence of this series, whilst still making them look dynamic and "human". The first plate for me stands out in this respect; depicting the Hanoverian infantry, one of the figures (from what the text tells us was a notoriuosly poorly regarded unit) is performing drill with a tree branch (with obvious ill-grace)instead of a musket to the clear amusement of his colleagues! As before, the inclusion of both British and Prussian figures in the plates might be regarded as unnecessary (particularly as is reduces the number of depictions of perhaps more obscure units), though they are actually relatively few in number. There are, in addition, a host of black-and-white illustrations within the body of the text showing more uniforms (if interested, the colour versions of most of these can found without too much trouble elsewhere - James Woods' recent titles for Partizan Press spring to mind).

Overall, an excellent book, by a team with a proven track record in this period - thoroughly recommended! Now, if we can only convince Osprey to look at the Swedes in Pommerania and especially the Reichsarmee, (oh and all right, maybe the Spanish) then they'll really have covered everything!
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 28 May 2012
I wanted a book that reviews the other Germans in Freddie's army without sinking into a great deal of detail. That is a wide spread of allies. This book covers the subject first by branch, cavalry, infantry, technical, light, then by state. Just what I needed. A good book, well written, great artwork.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 April 2013
A good basic review of the armies taking part in the 1756-63 campaign.7 more words are a waste of breath
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 28 May 2015
very good
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse



Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)