Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Blind Boys of Alabama Learn more Fitbit

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
171
4.3 out of 5 stars
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£10.68+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2015
The title for this book is odd and it makes you think this is some spin of done for cynical dollars whereas it is a proper chapter in the story arc. Granted it is a short chapter without the ambitious achievements of the first book but it definitely delivers the same heart and humour you demand.

Romita’s art is perfect. His style fits extremely well for a title that is chiefly about children yet expresses ultraviolence with equal ease.

This is a series that is primarily Millar’s personal “disgruntled of Scotland’” letters to the Times about the state of the world. This includes disposable culture, criminality and a large helping of comic books. Whilst not quite breaking the fourth wall the constant comic book references remind you that you are reading fiction yet assure you that the author really is speaking your language.

A Thumbs Up!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 April 2015
I love the Kick Ass series - just as books alone they are decadent, saturated in colour and highly developed panels. The hardback volumes weigh a bloody ton too which makes reading in bed a power-lifting exercise. This is to be the last in the Kick Ass story and ties up a lot of loose ends. Dave (Kick Ass) is leading the Justice Forever group and to be honest they are less superheroey and more superwhiny these days. Like all modern life, the boredom and routine has settled in. Dave can't even get the energy together to help Mindy (Hit Girl) get free from the mental asylum/prison that she has been sent to. But someone's coming for Kick Ass and he will really need to get his sh*t together.

It's sad to see a great series end so soon but I think that it is the right time - I don't want to become bored like Justice Forever!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Need customer service? Click here