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Customer reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
14
3.7 out of 5 stars


on 18 July 2017
Not my cup of tea.
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VINE VOICEon 2 December 2011
A high-quality, well-produced book, containing every Bond serialisation to have appeared in The Daily Express between 1958 and 1962. Drawn by the gifted JOHN McCLUSKY, I was initially a bit underwhelmed by the rather straightforward style, but I soon realised why: three-panel strips had to conform to the newspaper format - a format that still remains to this day. Duh. Following that, it didn't take long to become fully absorbed by some quite excellent adaptations of the original novels. In the first few pages of the opening story, CASINO ROYALE, the likeness of Bond to IAN FLEMING is quite striking, but then the style settles down and 007 becomes quite a craggy angular type, not exactly bland, just resembling no-one in particular. And even though the scale is considerably less than we've been used to seeing on the big screen for nearly 50 years, there are still many recognisable story set-pieces. Additionally, a fair amount of torture features throughout (although rendered with subtlety by McClusky) and this clearly reflects Fleming's rough and tumble take on Cold War espionage. The monochrome worlds of James Bond's broadsheet adventures are therefore certainly not without their quota of highly-charged excitement, which ensures everything moves along at a fast pace and the attention never flags. Each story's respective characters are vividly realised and, yes, all the early Bond racial stereotypes and female 'affectations' are present and (politically in)correct. To be fair, PC was very much a thing of the future in those days so to criticise it too harshly now is to miss the point somewhat. With that in mind then, it's not exactly difficult to see why the novels were snapped up by EON Productions soon after publication, and why the suave British Secret Service agent became such a worldwide success. These comic strips were yet another phase of the burgeoning 007 phenomenon, bringing it to an even wider audience. If you're prepared to go with the (ink)flow, THE JAMES BOND OMNIBUS Volume 1 is a ride well worth taking, perfect for the genuine fan who wants more than just celluloid thrills. And the same, not surprisingly, applies equally to Volume 002.

Featuring: DR NO (check out the deadly centipede!); FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE; GOLDFINGER; THUNDERBALL; DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER; LIVE AND LET DIE; MOONRAKER; FOR YOUR EYES ONLY; FROM A VIEW TO A KILL; CASINO ROYALE and, er, RISICO(?)

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
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on 25 May 2014
This wonderful compilation of the first ever James Bond strip cartoons from the Daily Express by John McLusky could be considered an 'historic document' for Bond fans, since it shows our hero as he was originally intended by Fleming in the pre-gadget, girls and gun laden movie series that was to follow. The 'Doctor No' treatment of Bond's torture scene below the villain's lair as drawn by McLusky is particularly dark and features a horrific fight with a giant squid not shown in the movie. The interesting feature of the truncated version of 'Thunderball' which was pulled from the paper after only a few weeks following a disagreement between Ian Fleming and the editor is also included. An entertaining addition to any Bond fan's bookshelf.
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on 18 October 2012
Whilst I applaud Titan for re-releasing these comic strips I must confess that they are not a patch on the original releases from 7 years back.
Whilst you do get more strips for your money you do lose out on the size (roughly two thirds of the earlier books) and none of the fascinating articles have been carried over.
So for the casual Bond fan this book is superb but if you are after a little bit more than I suggest picking up the original Titan albums which has better paper and the artwork is far more clearer.
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on 23 November 2009
Books. Hate `em. Too many words.

Thank Alfred, then, for The James Bond Omnibus, a collection of comic strips that ran in the Daily Express between 1958 and 1962. This book, which is made of 100% recycled groovy, is the perfect thing for a dangerously obsessive Bond freak who's watched the films and read the novels so many times that he introduces himself with his surname first, then his first name and surname together, even if he has a name that doesn't sound remotely cool when spoken like that. Fortunately I don't know anyone quite that obsessive, and I certainly wouldn't be caught doing that myself, oh no.

Anyway. Ian Fleming's original books were serialised in the Express in the days before it became the Daily Diana Conspiracy Theory, and if you'd been around then you would have been alternately entertained by the zippy plots and fantastic artwork (by John McLusky in this book; other artists such as the peerless Yaroslav Horak - surely a Bond villain name if ever there was one - would take over later), and frustrated by the fact that it took about four seconds to read and then you had to wait till tomorrow for the next four seconds. But the majesty of this book is that that frustration has been banished - banished, I say! - by squidging them all together into one continuous story.

One thing I love about Fleming's novels is that Bond can often be found spouting the most ridiculous put-downs to the villains which even Roger Moore would have trouble saying out loud, and I'm pleased to see they're carried through to the comic strips. My current favourite, from 'Moonraker', is: "I think you're a lunatic, and a hairy faced lunatic at that".

Furthermore, when they ran out of original stories, writer Jim Lawrence came up with a bucketload more, which I haven't read but am very excited about, despite them having Harry Potteresque titles like `The League Of Vampires', `When The Wizard Awakes' and `The Xanadu Connection'. And I shudder to think what `Doomcrack' is all about, but I look forward to finding out.

So well done to Titan Books for parping out this beauty, keep `em coming and have a free plug on The Incredible Suit for your troubles.
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on 28 July 2013
Wish it had been clearer that these were cartoon versions of Bond so be clear when you buy this they are cartoons.
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on 1 December 2009
Forget the films these comic strips are based on the novels and manage in a few pages to capture the plot and characters perfectly. the stories zip along. the action is raw, the women are beautiful, the villains are devilish and Bond is exactly as you would imagine him. Highly recommended
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on 14 February 2013
Brilliant collection of classic Bond stories where everything is black and white. The heroes are good looking and the women are beautiful. Even the lack of colour seems to fit the timescape of these well-paced tales.
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on 30 July 2011
i thought this was the ian fleming novels in an omnibus, not a collection of comic strips. The product name is very miss leading if you haven't got much time to look through descriptions. it should put that is a comic book collection in the title.
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on 10 January 2011
An ideal book for James Bond fans of all ages as it is in graphic (comic strip) format. Dip in and indulge in the orginal Ian Fleming stories in comic strip. The book will also appeal to art students studying different styles and eras.
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