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on 20 February 2014
This book is excellent for anyone wishing to take a trip by train within Europe. The book contains 50 routes across European countries (for example, Barcelona to Lisbon, Budapest to Istanbul and Berlin to Krakow), and a guide to hub cities across Europe (London, Paris, Rome, Berlin, Budapest, Belgrade etc). I have found this route very useful; it explains the scenery of the routes included, the trains you should take and the best places to visit along the way. You should definitely buy this if you're considering making a particular journey in Europe but do not know exactly which trip to do and you are in need of ideas.
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on 27 July 2016
Comprehensive
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on 26 October 2016
A great trip planning guide. Takes you to the byways with practical tips.fun just to read also!
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on 12 April 2017
A very useful guide.
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on 17 June 2017
Useful for planning trip
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on 27 March 2017
Very interesting book.
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on 2 October 2015
Book arrived promptly in good condition A advertised. Great book for those who want to embark on an adventure like no other!
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on 17 June 2016
A brilliant concept, wonderfully executed. Instead of a guide to Europe, this is a guide to the rail journeys of Europe, celebrating the pleasure of train travel for its own sake as well as the places you might visit en route.

The challenge with guidebooks nowadays is to find a niche that isn’t covered by the internet. It is no longer necessary to list dozens of places to stay and eat at every place you might visit, nor to pack the pages with stuff easily found online such as museum opening times and city maps. Instead we have a succinct volume that is packed with honest and well-informed advice – and so pleasantly written and logically laid out that you could read it cover to cover even if you don’t leave your armchair or venture no further than your daily commute between East Croydon and Victoria.

We are treated to fifty routes through European countries, some within the bounds of a single country, others crossing international borders, and using the index map inside the front and back covers you could soon amalgamate routes and design your own trans-Europe adventure, from London to Zakopane, for instance, or from Warsaw to Porto. Each has a simple map, journey times and cross-references to the European Rail Timetable. Thus on a journey from Hamburg to Stockholm, you are given a breakdown of the journey times and frequencies of each stage, and pointed to the possibility of getting a direct train all the way. But you probably won’t want to rush it, and the authors have picked out some recommended stopovers such as Lübeck, where they’ve picked out three places to stay and summed up what’s special about the place without stifling the style with a surfeit of unnecessary info for its own sake. In Copenhagen, they’ve summarised what you need to know for arrival and getting around – city transport tickets and how you buy them and if you need to validate them can be an endless source of confusion for international travellers, so that’s very useful advice. They then suggest a diversion by a local train to Helsingør before heading into southern Sweden. Once in Stockholm they set out options to travel further, by overnight train into Lapland – another route featured later in the book – or by ship to such places as Turku in Finland or Riga in Latvia, stopping at the Åland Islands on the way

The book opens, as you’d expect, with a chapter on practicalities, but even here you get the feeling the authors have gone out of the way to be thoughtful – weighing up the pros and cons of first-class and second-class travel, steering you through the maze that is railway ticket pricing and enthusiastically sidestepping into the story of the rise of Loco2, which has become the preferred partner for ticket sales for readers of this book. Then follows the book’s only excursion into full-colour photos – not just pretty views, but informatively captioned pictures that give you an idea of what featured places are like.

All in all, a book to inspire you to savour the rhythmic motion of train travel, to watch Europe moving through the window and bring your curiosity to a new place.
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on 21 June 2016
It's simply a fantastic read. Highly immersive and unputdownable- if there is such a word. I'd also recommend Hidden Europe magazine too.
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on 19 June 2016
This new edition of Europe by Rail is a superb read. It is (as the authors say in their introduction) a book with a history. Its pedigree can traced right back to the earliest days of Thomas Cook in the 1870s. The emphasis is on the actual journeys and each route is described in prose which is always very readable, and is at times quite exquisite.

There is some real poetry in this book. But it also brims with facts. If you are unsure how to buy a train ticket from London to Venice, this book shows you how. It shows just how easy it is nowadays to make long hops across Europe by train. And it's also quite persuasive - a clarion call to us all to restore sanity to travel by swapping planes for trains.

The two authors have a strong track record. So they bring great authority to Europe by Rail. But this is not a ponderous or overbearing authority. It's all immense fun. So the appeal of the book is that you get a sense of the wide-eyed enthusiasm of the authors for the places along each journey. It is almost as if they are discovering places for the first time. Words flow off the page as the countryside slips past your train. This book brings journeys alive.

If you cannot decide whether to take a weekend break in Antwerp or Marseille, if you are hovering between choosing Sweden or Spain for your summer hols, this book will help you decide. And it shows how to get to these places easily by train, where to stop off, what to see along the way - and much more. Great for those exploring Europe with a Eurail or Interail pass of course. But good, too, for those of us who just make one or two trips each year.
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