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Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
18


on 21 February 2014
I already own lots of books like these by Carlton Books. As with the others the quality of this book is superb. This book contains 22 removable documents, including, An extract from Le Petit Vingtième where the first Tintin strip appeared, a poster created by Hergé for bookshops when he released The Castafiore Emerald and a scene that didn't make it to the book from Tintin and the Picaros. Other memorabilia included artwork and postcards by Hergé. The quality of this book is excellent. It has a padded cover and the print quality is excellent. The start of the book contains a two page interview with Hergé and the rest of the book covers all the Tintin books in about 3-4 pages each. As with most of these kind of books, there is not too much text but there is a lot of pictures, so if you want a detailed history of Tintin, this book may not be ideal.
The two preview pages that are here on Amazon are not actually in the book.

Overall, I highly recommend this book, the quality is excellent and it makes an interesting read.
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on 18 May 2017
A Beautifully laid out Book for all TinTin fans.
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on 6 April 2017
1929 – 1940 - The book really begins on page 8, which is about Tintin in the Land of the Soviets. This chapter covers the first adventure to King Ottokar’s Sceptre. The page shows the original first page of the Soviets, and on page 12 the section mentions Quick & Flupke, the two little street urchins. On page 19, the first folder appears. It includes a letter from Herge, a colour proof for an illustration of a puzzle, a little advertisement for the first colour edition of Cigars of the Pharaoh and sketches for people in The Blue Lotus. On page 30, it mentions Jo, Zette and Jocko and why they were created. On the final page of the chapter, it shows an illustration of a boy and girl scout calendar that Herge created near the time of the Second World War.

1940 – 1944 - this chapter begins with The Crab with the Golden Claws, and tells about the unused title for the book. It shows a marvelous advertisement for Tintin and Quick and Flupke, and then we see the intended first page of The Shooting Star and some information and a poster of a Tintin play named Mr. Boullock’s Disappearance. On the next page, we see a page from The Secret of the Unicorn serialised in another magazine named “Coeurs Vallients” (with a terrible drawing of Tintin, Haddock and Snowy at the top!) and the cover of a book Herge used as a reference. To begin with The Seven Crystal Balls, we see the first front-page picture for the book and a strip never published in the magazine “Le Soir” or in the book.

1946 – 1960 - The next chapter has the third folder, which also includes a reproduction of the first Tintin magazine, and is about Prisoners of the Sun. It mentions the many cut sequences from the Tintin magazine (first created at this time) and has an ink illustration for one of the Tintin magazines. After Land of Black Gold, we see the abandoned first page for Destination Moon and we see original pages from the Tintin magazine. After we read about The Calculus Affair and Red Sea Sharks, we are on the next and final chapter.

1960 – 1983 - We find the final folder for the book, and inside there is a greetings card, the pencil plate of The Calculus Affair, the colour proof for Red Sea Sharks, a draft for Flight 714, the unpublished page from Tintin and the Picaros and a page from Alph-Art. On page 79, we discover the Belvision cartoons of Tintin and on the next page a cover of Tintin magazine during the publication of The Castafiore Emerald. On page 85 we get to see the draft illustration for Flight 714, an advertisement for the book and an illustration for Casterman’s 1968 catalogue. After Picaros, there is finally Tintin and Alph-Art, where we see the illustration for Tintin’s 50th birthday and finally end the book with a picture of the inside of the Tintin museum in Belgium.

Conclusion – There are a few careless and clunky sentences here and there, but overall with the beautiful pictures and being able to cover 24 albums in 96 pages makes this book worthy of 4 stars.
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on 15 January 2014
As a fan of Tintin from being a child, my boyfriend was really pleased with this book. Lots of pictures, illustrations and old artwork. Well thought out. The price surprised us both, we thought it would cost much more. Only downside, Amazon had to send us 3 copies as the first two book covers arrived damaged. The cover is padded so can easily be damaged. All ended well though as these were returned with no extra cost.
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on 8 January 2015
A stunning book with wonderful detail and gorgeous loose-leaf facsimile documents. Bought for my husband who adores the artwork - a real treasure indeed.
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on 8 March 2014
My daughter is a big tintin fan, and she was delighted with this book. Lots of facts and reproductions of original posters etc...
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on 9 November 2016
A beautiful and informative book, packed with lovely illustrations - many of them rare - and accompanied by highly readable text, which brings Hergé’s creative process to life.
The crowning glory of the book is the inclusion of many beautifully rendered detailed facsimiles of items from the Studios Hergé archives: from an early exercise book in which Hergé made character sketches and notes for future books, to full-size reproductions of the original ink artwork for the cover of “The Secret of The Unicorn” and a rare advertising poster for the Tintin books, these are true treasures for any Tintin fan!
Highly recommended to Tintinologists young and old, and for anyone interested in how a master of comic art went about producing his work.
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on 10 July 2015
Superb book. Given to BIL for his birthday & he was delighted with it, being a huge Tintin fan
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on 4 January 2016
Lovely quality book with a fascinating insight into the Tintin books and the influences surrounding them. Additional artwork plates makes this an outstanding gift for any Tintin fan. Purchased on the Black Friday deal making it exceptional value.
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on 5 March 2016
Really is an amazing book. I've loved Tintin all my life and have read them over and over countless times. Here's the surprise...right now, you can pick this book up in WH Smiths brand new for £5.
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