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on 25 September 2013
A fine series of complaints, but when it comes to analysis there's not much there. If you give government to powerful political parties, if you give money-creation to the Bank of England and commercial banks, what can you expect except an oligarchy, growing worse and worse as their powers grow more entrenched?

The trouble is: two fine British inventions - electoral representation and bank-money - which fuelled the Empire and dazzled peoples everywhere, have now become the scourges of the world. Electoral representation, posing as democracy, gives power to hypocritical elites; central banks regulate money-creation for the benefit of governments and investors.

To restrain rampant war, economic growth and poverty, environmental destruction and armament proliferation, we need the introduction of some proper democracy and a modern system of money-creation which does not hand money direct to the destroyers of our world.
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on 1 June 2013
This book is very well written and starts promisingly, but degenerates into a personal ramble in contemporary politics. The idea of oligarchies in commerce, politics, the EU and so on is not very original, although it is made here to seem like a great insight. The author has clear views about the greed of bankers, the shortcomings of politicians and so on, but I was left not feeling much wiser, better informed or much clearer about what could be done about self-serving oligarchies. And the last chapter is not about oligarchies at all.
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on 18 June 2012
A wealth of detailed research into the rise of exclusive groups in business, banking and politics makes this book an important must-read for anyone interested in solutions to the social problems this phenomenon creates. I was slightly disappointed not to find more radical conclusions but the author's background, wide range of reference points and vast political experience point to evolution rather than revolution which is more practical than utopian.
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on 27 July 2013
This book gives one an understanding of how a few wealthy people are controlling all the levers of power in the United Kingdom. They use this power for their own short-term benefit at the expense of the rest of the population and to the detriment of the country's long-term prosperity. It is an easy read because it is very entertainingly written and is punctuated with vivid examples.
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on 15 October 2016
good
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on 4 December 2017
ok
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on 22 October 2013
Basically a well written book advancing an interesting thesis which seems to be true, but could do with more on why politicians are so out of touch and what needs to happen to renew the political system
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on 6 August 2012
An interesting book that did make me think about some of my preconceptions. But ultimately he buys too much into the "Spirit Level"
critique that equality is a good in its own right, and there is too much hindsight about the mistakes of pre-2008. Not enough really new thought and ideas.
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on 7 June 2012
The book began well and had interesting observations on the current power structures in this country.
The real problem Mount had was to provide a good ending and he failed himself there,so in a way the conclusion was no conclusion and a bit of a damp squib!!
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on 14 January 2013
This is a ferocious critique of the current decayed state of capitalism from a right-wing viewpoint, and the result is extraordinarily stimulating and illuminating. It castigates the enormous growth of inequality of income that has grown up over the last thirty years or so, and cites George Orwell's warning in 1946 of the drift towards oligarchy, the New Few capitalists, who have sidelined the shareholders, the nominal owners of the companies they head, have avoided all personal financial risk, and paid themselves gigantic salaries. It is a book that those of all political parties, or of none, can and ought to read with profit and concern, as we try as a nation to determine the path ahead.
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