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on 9 June 2010
Since I own the first edition of this book I was unsure whether this was worth buying again. However once again this is a deliciously indiscreet account of the making of Britain's finest horror movie with even more information, particularly concerning the aborted sequel, than the Sidgwick and Jackson edition.

Besides detailing the differences that have grown up since the making of the movie between Director Robin Hardy and writer Anthony Shaffer writer Allan Brown also provides a non-stop stream of anecdotes from almost all of the crew who worked on that windswept set in Dumfries and Galloway in autumn 1972. Christopher Lee comes across as an egomaniac with a deep love of the film who is prepared to go to any lengths to get it the recognition it deserves whilst Britt Ekland is painted as a humourless diva much disliked by the crew. The nicest members of the cast were clearly Edward Woodward and Diane Cilento!

What sets this apart from most other movie books is the fact that it tells it like it was, arguments and all, with the input of all those who got a knife in the back from everybody else.

Candid, thoroughly revised and frequently laugh out loud funny. Get it!
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on 25 August 2010
I bought the original edition of this book, and was then in attendance at the fateful evening at the National Film Theatre that is described in the Introduction to this new edition. I can heartily recommend this, as it's far from a double-dip: it's been totally revised, with newly discovered photos, more details on Shaffer's proposed sequel, even a new chapter to give the remake the kicking it so richly deserves.

With Robin Hardy's sequel-cum-'second trip to the same well' The Wicker Tree awaiting release, I look forward to the third edition!
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on 2 September 2015
Allan Brown’s oral history of the making of “The Wicker Man” opens with the famous 1676 antiquarian image and goes on to the promotion of the film and the making of the dreadful remake. His subtitle “How not to make a cult classic” shows his theme which is the question of why is the film so good when its conception, filming and promotion were so troubled. The book could benefit from some editing as the same phrases and stories recur, and this can happen in oral histories as narratives are repeated with minor variations. And like many oral histories it presents accounts that often conflict one another and known facts. It is the oral details that fascinate, such as Lindsey Kemp’s confession that “Kubrick kicked me off 2001: A Space Odyssey because he thought my arse was too big”. What role one wonders? An ape? He memorably puts down Christopher Lee’s pretentions, and sums up Britt Ekland blisteringly with “her telephone sex with Michael Caine in Get Carter reminding many people of a pole dancer in the midst of acute appendicitis”. The book is illustrated with many unusual photographs on and off set.
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on 28 May 2014
always wanted this book. It has a lot of details that a huge fan of the wicker man aught to know! (although i have heard some of the things Allan says in this book aren't entirely true) it's still an incredibly interesting read. Arrived very quickly, very happy.
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on 6 January 2014
If you love the 1973 British classic film The Wicker Man, then this is the book for you. Utterly fascinating from beginning to end. Buy it, and devour it.
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on 8 September 2010
It is a wonder this film got made and released at all.
For those that have an interest in cult films, the subtitle of the book says it all.
I tried to find this book for years, being a big fan of this film. The book was out of print. The writer is Scottish, so he gets all credibility points for that, seeing as it was mostly made in Scotland. The book is hard going at times, getting slightly bogged down in technical details. The balance sheet of the film's costing is in there too, so one cannot say it is not thorough.
A book like this is required as the film means a lot to many, probably for as many reasons as there are things that went wrong whilst making it ! I still don't know what type of film THE WICKER MAN is, but I'm glad that I can buy the book again. It also isn't easily available in Australia.
The writer's style is straight up , not afraid to have a go at people when he feels it is warranted.
With this book and the film by your side, you will be well set up.
I recommend all fans buy a copy whilst they can - I'm not connected with the author, by the way. You never know how long it will stay in print this time. I enjoyed it very much and hope others do too.
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on 12 March 2015
Mean-minded book about a mean-minded British film industry, the latter of which rarely produces anything worth wiping your arse on: A sad parade of the jealousy and envy of the abilities of others.
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