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4.7 out of 5 stars
6
4.7 out of 5 stars

on 16 August 2016
Not a long book but sharp and to the point, outlining issues that even as the mother of a stunning daughter with trisomy 21 I had not thought of. I would recommend this to parents and anyone​ interested in the place of individuals in society. A great book for raising the bar on our consciousness and beliefs. Should be given to every educator, midwife, health visitor etc in training.
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VINE VOICEon 26 October 2011
Kieron has bravely and eloquently taken on a subject that most people never even think about until it affects them.

It is this ignorance that has spawned the most upsetting and distressing discrimination against people with Down's Syndrome.

Maybe things are a bit better than they were a while ago, but there is still a long road to travel before we can say we're a fully inclusive society.

I personally think it's 'medicine' that needs to change, rather than politics having had years of dealing with doctors for my youngest sibling who is, firstly a person, not a 'sufferer' of a 'syndrome'.

His book describes how we as a society have created a terrible assumption that Down's = suffering, expense, low-life expectancy, early death, unemployment etc etc and we routinely 'screen' expectant mothers sending a 'very strong signal from the very start, principally that Down syndrome is such a serious condition that a national screening program is necessary; which is the case in the UK and of many other Western countries.'

A person with Down's syndrome is a person, not an expense on society's budget.

I applaud Kieron's worthy writing.
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on 12 September 2011
'we are very sorry your child has down's syndrome' is something many parents get told either before or after birth.
You get thrown headlong into a word thats different and a world that also judges and hates.
yet there you are with your child, they are a child first, syndrome after.
even professionals forget and comedians like to use out of date info to boost their career.

This book is written by someone with insight and knowledge which many of us could and can learn from
This isnt just for parents of Down's syndrome, its a wake up call book for a society with out of date views
Stero typing society because they dont realise little was put into seeing the potential of those with Down's syndrome
Those that do can tell you a few things.

Its something that the Frankie Boyles of life should read em and weep
but i am maybe bias
I am just a human being wanting to progress in knowledge, I have many faults, i am human, but I dont judge others too much,
life has a way of it hitting you back!
Years ago i had some wonderful friends as been a country secondary school we had the wonderful experience to have inclusion of some disabled, I was honoured to be one girls friend, sadly she died at 13 during yet another operation.
Few years on I worked with my first person With Down's syndrome, in a cafe. wonderful experience.
Years on and typical children, I prayed I would have a child with ds - I am blessed now.
But this writers book is a wonder to anyone in the world, not just parents, there is so much here that its a must to be shared throughout the world
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on 11 January 2013
This is a very stimulating, moving and insightful book whose title gives only the starting point. Its discussion of Down Syndrome in children and adults has lessons for our general understanding of how `the other' is treated in society.

Kieron shows up the limitations of a purely psychological (self-help) approach by stressing structural - political - factors and how they affect the way Down Syndrome is viewed and addressed in policy and practice. In a consumerist society, Kieron argues, we `become too obsessed with the personal' and so lose sight of the political environment. One aspect which links the personal and the political is the use of language and the book has many illuminating examples of how critical terms (such as `ethical', `technical' and `human') are defined and redefined in support of prevailing orthodoxy. Kieron's argument eloquently sheds light on the situation of people with Down Syndrome - and the challenges facing any minority group which finds itself marginalised and stigmatised - and he offers pointers for change. I learnt a lot from it and recommend it.
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on 14 November 2011
If only I had read this book before starting our family. Many pages spoke volumes and touched on subjects I had previously not considered. A thought provoking and throughly enjoyable read.
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on 28 November 2011
An engrossing read - I couldn't put it down. But as the parent of a child with Down's Syndrome I do have a personal interest in the subject. I was a bit disappointed it wasn't longer though. Would recommend it to any parent/relative of a person with Down's.
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