Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Fitbit



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 31 January 2017
This is a book that includes many separate and very different articles on aspects of zero/nothing, aiming to please most of the people some of the time. Some of the articles are difficult and dare I say tedious for the non-scientifically minded (e.g. the very long one - or did it only seem that way? - on the proof of vacuums), while others will get the imagination going and appeal far more. And doubtless for the scientifically-minded, some of them are just too populist for words.

The topics mainly covered are mathematics, physics (especially astrophysics) and medicine. I was hoping for something about nothingness in philosophy, but as this is a New Scientist publication, perhaps that was not a realistic hope.

I did enjoy it but I found myself skimming some articles, and I think most people would do the same, although the articles skimmed would vary. In my opinion it's best to read one article at a time followed by a break, because they don't lead on from each other in any logical way.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 June 2017
Exceptionally revealing. I would have imagined that a book about "nothing" would be limited but, in truth, that was because of my limited reasoning to understand the concept. This book has made me realise that "nothing" is, in fact one of the most complex and bewildering concepts in the universe. Brilliantly written and straight enough for me to understand
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 December 2015
Webb, Jeremy (ed). Nothing.

This collection of essay extracts and commentaries from New Scientist is a layman’s introduction to what goes on in the universe and in the psyche. The fact that these two aspects of life are alternated throughout the book gives it balance and enhances readabilty. There is little that is new here, but the arrangement is satisfying, allowing one a break, as it were, from hard science and mathematics to bodies. As a non-scientist I found the book a relatively easy read, a book to dip into rather than a work of learned research. I now know the age of the universe (13.82 billion years) and the earth (4.55 billion) so I know that nothing much counts in the grand scheme. Microscience and quantum physics are fascinating, but to me almost unintelligible and the words ‘big’ and ‘small’ are valid only relatively.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 May 2017
look great
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 November 2015
If you want to have painful stress head ache - read this lol...discusses things that are relative, nothing is absolutely true.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 May 2014
I was quite disappointed by this issue from the New Scientist. I expect cutting edge from the magazine but instead got old news - most of which is available on w3, allbeit in slightly different form. Certainly , I learned some new things - and this made reading the book worth the time, however, as a whole, although each article was well enough presented, I would categorize it as a mediocre effort and put the blame on the editors not the individual authors.
Sorry guys!

George F. Hart, Professor emeritus, LSU.
33 Comments| 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 February 2014
This isn't a bad book. But it's not really about 'Nothing'. The essay about Placebos wasn't about 'Nothing' - it was about placebos which aren't 'nothing'. Equally the essay about vacuums isn't about 'nothing' since the author established a pure vacuum is impossible to achieve. Same goes for the essay about transistors. In fact virtually every chapter isn't about 'nothing'. The closest we come to 'nothing' is the Big Bang essay - which stops being about 'nothing' too once the author establishes some matter the 'size of a pea' was responsible for all the matter in the universe.

Anyway it's an interesting book - but I was mislead by the title and felt a little disappointed with the content
55 Comments| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 December 2013
Great to pick up and put down, interesting if not querky. Essential reading for those who love science and understand it or for those who want something different to read whilst learning something
0Comment| 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 January 2014
nice collection of articles from the magazine, makes interesting reading and can be read in short bursts as its not one long tome...
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 February 2014
My brother seems to like it - and he was the person who asked for it (christmas present). I have to say I read the first chapter or so, and even I (who really doesn't enjoy this sort of thing normally) was interested in it, and would happily read more. Clear, and easy to understand.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse