Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Learn more Shop now Learn more

Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
70
Underground, Overground: A Passenger's History of the Tube
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£5.53+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on 21 March 2013
This is a most entertaining and personal account of the Underground which celebrated its 150th anniversary this year. Andrew Martin states that the Tube should strictly be used as the name for the lines that are on average 40 feet below the surface and that the lines just below the surface are 'cut and cover' lines. Another key fact is that 55 per cent of the Underground is on the surface.
The oddities and eccentricities of the oldest metropolitan transport system in the world are covered and as it transports over a billiion passengers every year, it fully deserves such an engaging book.
The book is written chronologically and its only obvious failing is its lack of maps. It covers everything from Opening to Oyster Cards and is a witty and compelling social history of a transport phenomenon.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 27 February 2014
First of all I have to say lucky so and so, it was most boys' dream in my era to have access to free First class rail travel and free Underground tickets. The book is written in the authors inimitable style, light, easily assimilated and humorous when required. There are facts and histories aplenty, and because of the way it is written, the book teaches the reader without them being aware, and overburdened. A very good read for anyone, such as I, who has a passing interest in the Underground, and an ideal start for someone who wishes to acquaint themselves with what is a superb system due to some positive forward thinking by our ancestors. A very entertaining book by a great writer.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 3 June 2013
Well this is a fascinating read, full of facts and personalities. Perhaps a little hard work for the layman, this book reveals the story of the construction of each of the lines that have become known collectively as the London UndergrounD

I didn’t realise how many different colourful individuals were involved a hundred years or so ago in the construction of London’s subterranean transport. This book gives an interesting insight into their characters and feuds which had such a strong effect on the system we have today. Thie story continues well into the 20th century as other visionaries weld the various lines into a railway that we all accept works ( most of the time ) despite all the difficulties experienced along the way

Don’t expect to get through this in a couple of hours………..
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 October 2017
I found it hard to put this book down. It's packed with interesting information about the Underground and how it came to be. The author's sense of humour comes across very well. The history is really well presented right from the beginnings of the Metropolitan railway to the widened lines and then the deeper level tube system. I now understand some of the many idiosyncrasies of the network and I've got a lot of things to look out for next time I'm in London. I'd recommend this as the first thing to read if you want to understand how the underground network came to be.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 13 August 2012
You have to be fair to this book - it doesn't really set out to be a comprehensive history of the system. that said, it does pretty well, looking chronologically at how it was all put together, and giving a few hints as to how it might develop in the future.

The compelling things about this book are the quality of writing, which is both entertaining and excellent, and the engagement with the subject. It's simply a really good, interesting read, sometimes a little colloquial but also scholarly.

There's just one this wrong with it - no maps. I think that Andrew Martin just knows the system so well that he doesn't need a map himself, but it would have been useful to be able to look at one while reading. that said, it's easy these days to download one, so I would suggest that if you buy this book then you do just that!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 30 August 2017
Fascinating story. Andrew manages to convey his lifelong enthusiasm for his subject. All sorts of abstruse details about the Underground and the development of modern London.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 18 February 2014
This is a very chatty and humorous telling of the history of the Tube, with some personal musings of the author thrown in for good measure! I thoroughly recommend it to anyone to read as you don't have to be an "anorak" to follow it and enjoy this book! My only reservation is, please can we have more illustrations in the next edition?
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 21 September 2017
Another excellent book from Andrew Martin. Keep it on your bookshelf next to Christian Woolmar's "Subterranean Railway".
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 15 February 2017
A good read if the subject appeals but some factual inaccuracies and a total lack of maps detract somewhat.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 10 August 2012
An interesting and enjoyable read, particularly for someone who spent most of his early life in and around the city. It recalled many memories and answered a few thst had been lodged in the back of the mind from day's gone by. At times it became a little heavy going but then opened up to further points of interest. In general an enjoyable publication to 'ramble' through.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)