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This book is about the Piccadilly Line, or more accurately, the type of houses and people who live in the areas of London served by this line.

It’s pointed out that there is more premium real estate along this line –residential, commercial and tourist – than any other on London. And then that point is made again. And again. And again.

The ebbs and flows of who lives where, what job they do, what country they come from and how rich they are is explained. And then explained again. And again. And then, just once more for luck.

As you may have gathered I found this book a little repetitive. And I have to say I also found the authors habit of littering his sentences with italics annoying as well!

While the book may have some interest to those who wish to chart the more recent changes in the demographics of London, I would suggest that more widely focused readers might wonder why they keep turning the pages.

The whole tone was a little too snug, a little too self referential and just too repetitive.

I have enjoyed a number of the other books in this series, but would suggest you start elsewhere on your journey through this collection of tube books.
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on 1 March 2013
Petr York is not the first person that comes to mind to write about the Tube, being one of the few utterly urban people never to have used it until commisioned to write this book. He manages to turn his lack of experience to advantage with a highly personal entertaining description of the areas above the Piccadilly Line. In his comfort zone ( within the confines of the Circle line) he whisks one along with his well observed wry epigrams of city life. More at home in Mayfair than in Boston Manor his descriptions of the more outlying areas tend to go no further than the local underground station. Was he frightened of the natives in Hounslow that he dared not tread beyond the comforting palisade of London Underground? This is a merry book and a great present to anybody with the slightest interest in London
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on 29 April 2013
I travelled on the Piccadilly Line from an early age, with my parents, to visit my grandparents - Rayners Lane to Mansion Houe or Turnpike Lane i.e. a journey across north London, but via Piccadilly and Leicester Square. In the 40's I didn't know what was up above, just that it took well over an hour to make this journey to my family. Then in 1948 I started travelling to school, but Peter Yorke confines himself to the central part of London that this line serves and does not cover the suburbs out to Uxbridge and Cockfosters. He is, however, very interesting spilling new facts and figures, about Mayfair and Covent Garden. This os such a fascinating series from Penguin with each author being allowed to do his or her own thing.
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on 31 May 2013
seeing as the Piccadilly line is so long and covers a miriad of realities I didn't appreciate the self-congratulatory exlusiveness of limiting the description to the handful of "top Monopoly board" areas.
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on 3 March 2014
I have been buying books from Peter York from Style Wars, to Sloane Ranger Handbook, Diary, Cooler Faster etc to Dictators Homes-this is the latest in his catalogue. Buy it, a nice addition.
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on 21 August 2014
Good stuff as usual from Peter York
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on 1 February 2014
I only got this to test whether Kindle edition downloads work on my iPad. They do,& the experience is great. As for the book, not as interesting as I expected Peter York to be. You need to be an anorak for this one.
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