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on 9 March 2013
In Wadham's London of the late 70s, early 80s, the world was up for grabs. Anything vaguely "establishment" was worthy of a kick in the teeth. But, as Wadham so deftly shows, even in the maelstrom of change where her family withstands the strains of drugs, sex and Thatcher, the kids still need tending to. The freewheeling family in this book manages to both go appropriately crazy in those crazy times while they also keep a watchful eye on each other. I love this book.
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on 12 March 2013
Lucy Wadham's story describes a turbulent, exciting time. I recognize the way she organizes the world in Heads and Straights. Like Wadham, I too experienced the 70's through a youthful, voyeuristic perspective. The older members of the family were more actively engaged with what was happening in the world. Wadham shares the story of loving her family and speaks of the craziness with equanimity. Her story is compelling and leaves me wanting to know more about the beautiful albeit fragile characters.
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on 24 May 2013
A lovely little book that follows the author's family tree; I read it at one sitting, in a Costa in Staines, and the excursion to 1970s Chelsea was very welcome. Heavy on anecdotes which made me want to read them aloud to friends, and plenty of characters who are indeed characters, but no plot to speak of, other than the unrolling of time. Less like the Circle Line than the Metropolitan in the way it wanders around the place. Recommended.
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on 26 March 2013
A gem of a book -- I was so sorry to finish reading it -- I wanted to know more about the family and about the narrator (so much so that now I am getting all her books). The narrator has a very appealing voice -- she is honest, intelligent, witty, incisive and warm in her account of her family; she's an intelligent, sympathetic insider at a very exciting time in 70's Chelsea, where it all was happening. Unmissable.
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on 17 September 2013
Like the other reviewers, I think Lucy Wadham is a good writer. What the book isn't is a direct celebration of London's Underground transport system which the series of titles was produced to commemorate.
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on 23 April 2013
An absolutly lovely book that gives you a very real slice of London in the 70's.
A family acting out the social changes of that period, written from the perspective of a fasinated observer and then participent.
This is a must for anyone growing up during this period.
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on 12 May 2013
I am a 90s baby; I was born in 1992, but this account of a group of young girls growing up on the kings road had themes with which i could draw comparisons to my own life. A fascinating read.

Also, you can read it in a few hours which is refreshing!
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