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on 22 June 2013
The way time is mystified in modern physics and cosmology baffles me. In my view the nature of time is simple. Things move. Agreed? Time is a measurement that compares the movement of one thing, A, to another, B, a reference object that we assume moves in a repetitively regular fashion, e.g. the sun, a pendulum, a caesium atom.

Time is real but dependant. There is a good analogy with temperature or smell. Temperature would not exist if objects never got hotter or colder and neither would smell exist if objects (or bodies!) never released smelly molecules. And time would not exist is nothing moved since time measures movement. Without movement, both practically and philosophically there would not even be a concept of time.

Lee Smolin's book is very clearly written and can be understood by the laywoman. (That's interesting – a lose-lose situation: 'layman' is a sexist word but 'laywoman' has sexist implications, "even a woman can understand the book.") I've read the long introduction and three chapters and I'm hooked. Smolin's career has been at the heart of modern physics and cosmology. In Time Reborn:..., he carefully presents a new paradigm that, if accepted, will do much to sort out the current controversies around the Big Bang, Dark Matter, String Theory and more. But the main reason I like this book is that it is the first popular science book I have read that agrees with me on the nature of time.
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on 23 December 2013
A big claim I know, but here goes. The Origin provided a explanation for the existence of life on Earth while Time Reborn provides and explanation for the existence of our universe and its physical properties. Both complex life and the existence of a universe with a wide range of elements are highly improbable, and can only be explained by successive developments over eons of time. Darwin did not know about DNA when he wrote the Origin and there is still much to be discovered in physics, but this book provides the first account of physics which makes sense to me as a layman. No other popular account of physics and cosmology has done this.

I had to read it twice to understand the gist of it, but it was well worth the effort. I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to understand nature.
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on 15 April 2016
An excellent book on cosmology but doesn't say when time started.
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on 21 December 2016
Interesting book and arrived promptly at low cost
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on 23 November 2013
No one explains the history, philosophy and current competing theories of physics as well as Lee Smolin.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, it has a philosophical feel to it which I really enjoyed. Sorry to come to the end of it, wonderful.
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on 15 October 2013
I heard Smolin interviewed on a radio podcast (Discovery, I think) talking about this book. It was an interesting and thoughtful interview and this is a writer who normally does not disappoint, However, I found this book a dismal and sisappointing experience. The premise (i.e. the 'death' of time is not at all established) and the solution (and its consequences) is not at all convincingly outlined. Instead, the book reads like a self jsutification and it seems that all the points Smolin wishes to make are held to be almost self-evidently true while the opposing view is helf to be self-evidently false.

This should have been an excellent read, after all the conundrum of the way we experience time is a deep one. However, by delving dangerously close to the realm of pseudo-science this book did not address the key issues for me at all. Really disappointing.
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on 16 April 2016
excellent and stimulating
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on 18 January 2014
Probably the best book in the temporal nature of the universe I have ever read. In part 1, Smolin describes how time is treated in our current theories of physics (from Newtonian mechanics, through Relativity to The Standard Model) - they effectively remove it. He also explains why such an approach cannot be applied to the universe as a whole. In part 2, he shows how many of the problems in physics can be overcome by embracing the reality of time. He discusses an evolving universe (as opposed to a multiverse) approach, how quantum mechanics and relativity might be united and how we can address time's apparent arrow. A very insightful book, albeit, a little bit of a drag at the end. Smolin can labour the point somewhat. But, thoroughly recommended if you are interested in the very fabric of physics and how we may take it forward in the future.
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on 15 April 2015
Very interesting book
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on 4 February 2015
very enjoyable book
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