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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 6 May 2016
Conceptually ‘Night of the Humans’ is quite intriguing. Considering all the places the Doctor has visited the author has managed to find something a bit different with the Gyre. As its name implies it is based upon the vast collection of rubbish that has gathered in the Pacific due to the movements of our waste by ocean currents. The Gyre of ‘Night of the Humans’ has a more science fiction emphasis in being a gathering of space debris that has built up in one area.

Living upon the Gyre is a human colony descended from the crew of a crashed ship who have utilised what technology they still have available to them but turned it into the foundation for a retrograde religion. There are also familiarities, perhaps, with ‘The Face of Evil’, which is a positive thing.

Also, as the title might suggest, there is an effort to make the humans the monsters of the piece. This isn’t entirely followed through, however, and remains primarily only the view of the Sittuun. The humans may be uncivilised, religiously blinded and somewhat barbaric but in essence they are merely trying to survive in a relatively hostile environment. The Sollogs, giant slugs existing in the wreckage, are the literal monsters of the story but it is Dirk Slipstream who, with his callousness to life and selfish obsessions, who is the real monster of the story.

As the plot develops and the story progresses it becomes less interesting but somewhat more action orientated. However, the action is quite well placed, if maybe a tad repetitive, and the author holds back a couple of revelations.

The characterisation of Amy is a bit odd and, at times, it’s hard to see the Doctor of this novel as the Eleventh. Some of the other characterisation is quite good though, especially Charlie. It is Dirk Slipstream that probably remains the most interesting, however. From initial impressions he is a showy conman who thinks a lot of himself, but there is also a dark and malicious side to his nature. He also seems to have a backstory which involves a previous encounter with the Doctor. This is more of a plot device than anything as he hasn’t previously appeared in any other Doctor Who stuff and the referenced encounter is with an unspecified earlier incarnation of the Doctor.

A pleasant read and one of the better early Eleventh Doctor novels.
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on 29 January 2017
as good as the advert said, and arrived earlier than promised, great, definitely use these guys again
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on 6 December 2016
very good
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on 4 June 2015
Very good read throughly enjoyed this book
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 31 October 2014
This Eleventh Doctor novel was published in 2010, so is a story about quite an early period of the Eleventh Doctor's incarnation, when he is travelling with Amy Pond. The Tardis is responding to a trans-temporal distress signal and lands on something solid in the Battani 045 system. Amy is astounded to learn that in Earth relative time it is the year 250,039. And they're about to find themselves in the middle of a very urgent problem. Because where they've landed is an object called the Gyre, a bundle of shipwrecks and refuse brought together by gravitational forces of nearby stars, and the Gyre is attracting the orbit of a comet which, if it hits will have a devastating impact on inhabited worlds within twenty-five million miles. So the Sittuun have despatched a ship with a nanobomb to destroy the Gyre, but they crashed on it, the local inhabitants have been killing their crew, and the comet's about to hit. So now would be a really bad time for the Doctor to be captured by somebody else ... wouldn't it?

This was a really good early Eleventh Doctor story; there is a good mix of alien cultures in the story, and the Doctor and Amy are characterised really well. The story itself is well paced, and the action races along, and the background and narrative to the story are well thought out. Definitely recommended.
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 31 October 2014
This Eleventh Doctor novel was published in 2010, so is a story about quite an early period of the Eleventh Doctor's incarnation, when he is travelling with Amy Pond. The Tardis is responding to a trans-temporal distress signal and lands on something solid in the Battani 045 system. Amy is astounded to learn that in Earth relative time it is the year 250,039. And they're about to find themselves in the middle of a very urgent problem. Because where they've landed is an object called the Gyre, a bundle of shipwrecks and refuse brought together by gravitational forces of nearby stars, and the Gyre is attracting the orbit of a comet which, if it hits will have a devastating impact on inhabited worlds within twenty-five million miles. So the Sittuun have despatched a ship with a nanobomb to destroy the Gyre, but they crashed on it, the local inhabitants have been killing their crew, and the comet's about to hit. So now would be a really bad time for the Doctor to be captured by somebody else ... wouldn't it?

This was a really good early Eleventh Doctor story; there is a good mix of alien cultures in the story, and the Doctor and Amy are characterised really well. The story itself is well paced, and the action races along, and the background and narrative to the story are well thought out. Definitely recommended.
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on 7 May 2013
Night of the Humans is part of BBC Book's collection of novels based around the TV Series and features the 11th Doctor and Amy. Landing on a junkyard in space they find themselves caught in between a battle between two alien societies, the Sittuum and a futuristic but savage version of Humans. A devastating comet is on it's way to cause imminent destruction and they face a race against time to save themselves and everybody else.

This is a fun and quick read and I found it much more readable than my previous encounter with BBC Doctor Who books. I really liked the alien world of the Gyre and without being overly convoluted or boring the plot kept my interest and felt like a throwback to the classic series that I gew up with. There are lots of cool aliens and a good balance of action and humour that will probably satisfy many a Whovian. Lots of good characters abound and I particularly liked Dirk Slipstream who (in my mind at least) was definitely Ace Rimmer from Red Dwarf!

I grew up with the old Target books and although as an old git I don't get as excited (as I used to) with reading this kind of thing, it was an average entertaining read. A good beginning, a good middle and a decent ending. What more could you want?

3/5

[...]
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TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 23 May 2010
A Doctor who novel, telling an all new story not seen on tv. It features the Eleventh Doctor and Amy. Like the previous novels in this range featuring the ninth and tenth doctor it's suitable for all ages and runs for 246 pages or so. To differentiate it from those previous novels the size of the pages is slightly larger and the cover design is all new, but the word count, page count and chapter count are still pretty much the same.

The story involves the TARDIS landing on the gyre. A world composed of bits of spacejunk that have drifted together and formed into a planet. It's the home of a humanoid alien race. Who don't get along with a group of humans who live there. The latter are descendants of a spaceship crew that crashed there long before, and have developed their own weird civilsation with some rather individualistic beliefs.

But the gyre is facing impending danger and it could be about to be destroyed. In one of two different ways. With clashing civilisations, a race against time, a separated TARDIS crew and a human adventurer who might have a hidden agenda, it's a race against time for the doctor to save the day.

Book can create worlds that you couldn't see on tv because the words can fire your imagination to create visuals that wouldn't be possible on the small screen. And that covers over well here, the whole setting being very imaginative. It also touches on some high concepts in regards to faith and belief. The race against time nature of the plot does make for a page turning read. Some books in this range have started rather slowly, but this one never lets up for an instant.

Considering that this was written before the eleventh doctor had been seen on screen, the characterisation of the Doctor and Amy is pretty good, and I never had any problems imagining it was the characters as depicted on tv. That may be down to the fact that as viewers we're more used to them now we're well into the season than if I'd read this earlier.

But all in all a good bit of science fiction and a good doctor who story. An above average entry in the range.
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on 17 January 2011
not going in to the story as most have done this so ill anylize the plot,charecters ect

plot

its a diffrent prespective in that its humans invaiding aleins and i like that but it also featured a tired sub plot in that the humans have a re written past ( wont say more than that ) if they stuck to the invasion plot it would have been a very diffrent very epic book unfortunetly the sub plot kinda ruind it

setting

this was another on/off thing for me the junkyard was very well done ( then blown when the reason behind it was told ) and i found the aleins side to be generic but it adds to the story and its conclusion

villains

the humans and slipstream

the humans are intresting in that they live trough a vid screen i found it intresting and the humans are actully very nasty and you want them to die but you feel sorry for them too so it works on all leavels just wish the reason for the way they were wasent a cop-out

slipstream

please please put this guy in the 2011 xmas story or at least the season 6 2nd half this guy is excellent he,s cocky aragant ( not sure if this means the same as cocky) hes charming and very pesusive ( to amy that is ) oh hes a con man too seriously he is fantastic

the good guys

the doctor

hes very well wrritten i think the best you can imagine him is when he telling the humans about the reason why they are what they are this was very nicely wrriten ( when he tell them about the mentor) i love the 11th doctor hes more alein than 10th ( no disrespect to 10th ) and a lot darker the ending shows this

amy

not too sure about the scottish lass iam not too convinced that the wrriter captured her in her sassy bubblely persona as well as apolo 13 or nuclear time did but to be fair this was wrriten when the new era began so ill let it slide

the aleins

ok i cant recall what they are called but they are very anoying and dont want to hear from them again i dont think they are the best monsters ( or aleins or whatever) to be created and found them very boring

plus side

excellent well written and well ploted story with a well written doctor ( always helps) and nice twist on a age old primise

minus

everything elese very boring aleins cop out ending

overall grade B-
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on 14 April 2013
'This is the Gyre - the most hostile environment in the galaxy...'

250,000 years' worth of junk floating in deep space, home to the shipwrecked Sittuun, the carnivorous Sollogs, and worst of all - the Humans. The Doctor and Amy arrive on this terrifying world in the middle of an all-out frontier war between Sittuun and Humans, and the countdown has already started. There's a comet in the sky, and it's on a collision course with the Gyre...

When the Doctor is kidnapped, it's up to Amy and "galaxy-famous swashbuckler" Dirk Slipstream to save the day. But who is Slipstream, exactly? And what is he really doing here?

A thrilling, time travel adventure featuring the Eleventh Doctor and Amy, as played by Matt Smith and Karen Gillan in the spectacular hit series from BBC Television
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