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TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 10 September 2007
another novel adventure for the tenth doctor who and his companion martha jones. like all of these books it's about two hundred and forty five pages long, in reasonably large print, and is generally written for slightly younger readers but all ages can enjoy.

In this story an off course landing brings the tardis onto a planet called sunday. the place has some very big swampland, and human colonists are struggling to establish themselves there. Not least because there's something strange in the swamp.

The prose is readable and the main characters are well written. There's a lot more of the jokey doctor than the serious side he usually shows, but some scenes are written from the point of view of supporting characters, and these work brilliantly in showing what the doctor is like. And some of these characters are very well written and quite likeable.

The plot takes a few good twists and turns, and I didn't predict all of it. The finale is satisfying. And the last scene is great. This is an above average entry in the range
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on 19 April 2013
When the TARDIS makes a disastrous landing in the swamps of the planet Sunday, the Doctor has no choice but to abandon Martha and try to find help. But the tranquillity of Sunday's swamps is deceptive, and even the TARDIS can't protect Martha forever.

The human pioneers of Sunday have their own dangers to face: homeless and alone, they're only just starting to realise that Sunday's wildlife isn't as harmless as it first seems. Why are the native otters behaving so strangely, and what is the creature in the swamps that is so interested in the humans, and the new arrivals?

The Doctor and Martha must fight to ensure that human intelligence doesn't become the greatest danger of all.

Featuring the Tenth Doctor and Martha as played by David Tennant and Freema Agyeman in the hit Doctor Who series from BBC Television.
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on 4 October 2016
Expecting breakfast at Tiffanys, Martha is sadly disappointed to find herself on a water logged world. It isn’t long before the Doctor has disappeared, the Tardis has sunk and she is whisked off by something under the water.

In many ways this is a typical story of a human colony trying to adapt to an alien environment on a new planet. With the recent disaster of the sudden flooding the colony is left struggling with limited resources whilst an alien threat develops. The local wildlife, who have been equated with Earth ‘otters’ much to the chagrin of the Doctor, seem to be going through behavioural changes which also seem to have started affecting the colonists when the Doctor arrives.

The alien creature responsible is left a little ambiguous as to exactly what it is and where it comes from, but that works in its favour and somehow extenuates the threat it poses. It bares similarities to the Krynoids but is sufficiently different to be intriguing.

Like many of the Tenth Doctor novels, the characterisation of Martha is somewhat off. She comes across as less mature and a bit more self-obsessed than she does onscreen. And there are other incidences where she is portrayed slightly like Rose. She is given quite a jealous streak which, presumably, the author has taken from the situation with Nurse Redfern in ‘Human Nature’ (probably taking place shortly before this novel) and tried to develop. Unfortunately Martha’s attitude to Ty often seems unsubstantiated and a tad petty.

For the most part the Doctor is well characterised and some of the diction is very Tenth Doctor. There is a tendency occasionally to make him a bit condescending towards the human settlers though.

The colonists are represented by a few characters that provide a rough cross section of the community; particularly Candice and Ty who both spend a considerable amount of time with the Doctor acting in a semi-companion like role during the many times Martha is indisposed or unconscious. Except for Pallister (an over ambitious; power hungry Politician whose name the Doctor continues to deliberately get wrong in much the same way as he does with the Valeyard), the colonists generally seem to be trying to do their best in a difficult situation.
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on 1 August 2011
This book is from the second batch of Martha Jones books.

Wetworld: When the TARDIS makes a disastrous landing in the swamps of the planet Sunday, the Doctor has no choice but to abandon Martha and try to find help. But the tranquillity of Sunday's swamps is deceptive, and even the TARDIS can't protect Martha forever.

The human pioneers of Sunday have their own dangers to face: homeless and alone, they're starting to see that Sunday's wildlife isn't as harmless as it appears. Why are the otters behaving so strangely, and what is the creature in the swamps that is so interested in the humans, and the new arrivals?

The Doctor and Martha must fight to ensure that human intelligence doesn't become the greatest danger of all.
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VINE VOICEon 20 March 2008
The 18th in BBC Books new series novel range finds the 10th Doctor and Martha stranded on the planet Sunday, trying to save a group of colonists from an intelligence leeching monster in the swamps.

Despite the less than impressive title (which as one character notes makes it sound like 'Planet of the Incontinents') and the bizarre spectacle of the Doctor and Martha being menaced by zombie otters, 'Wetworld' is actually one of the best of the new series novels. With it's scientific approach and the gruesome nature of the slime creature in the swamp this certainly feels more adult than many of the new series novels, and Michalowski nails the gabbling character of the 10th Doctor perfectly. Recommended.
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on 16 February 2016
Well read, voices good, varied and easily distinguished. Just LOVED the wild life!
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on 23 November 2015
Great addition to my collection, would recommend
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on 6 March 2010
This is not one of my favorite Doctor Who Stories, even in print form. When it was abridged for audio, the cut so much of the plot that the ending becomes a little fast and anti-climatic.
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on 15 April 2016
Excellent product
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on 4 June 2010
A fun book in the series, with a few dilemmas (losing the TARDIS and the Sonic screwdriver). The locations, all around a swamp, whilst not wildly alien are interesting enough, and the book doesn't linger on elements too much. The characters are lively and realistic, and the monsters are original and thought provoking.
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